Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Fanboy and Comma girl, a love story. By Mr. E. Hi. I'm James from engVid. And you're probably

  • wondering: What the hell am I talking about? Fanboy and Comma... Comma Girl, okay? She's

  • a superhero, and our boy loves her. In case you don't know what a fanboy is because you

  • may not follow comics or movies as religiously as these guys do, I've got a definition for

  • you. So let's just read: What is a "fanboy"? A person who is loyal to a game, person, or

  • company, regardless if it sucks or not. That's not quite true, but what they are talking

  • about is that fanboys love their products. If they love Apple, it is the best the universe

  • has ever produced. And if Apple does something wrong, help them, somebody help them because

  • they will be angry. But generally put, they just love their products so much, they let

  • everybody know about them. Anybody with ears that will listen or who cannot escape from

  • them. All right?

  • So how does this have anything to do with English and grammar? Well, this is a grammar

  • lesson, and I find sometimes grammar can be incredibly boring, so let's make it a little

  • bit fun. So we created a love story by Mr. E. Now, let's start off with comma. Because

  • what is this lesson about? It's how, well, conjunctions, which I'm going to get to, work

  • with commas and sentences. Some of you might have problems with them, I mean, some of you

  • might even go: "Conjunctions, what are they?" So I'm going to talk about the most common

  • conjunctions, and I'm going to talk about comma usage. Okay? We're going to do a quick

  • lesson, here, and I'll make it fun. You ready?

  • So the first thing we should talk about is a comma. What is a comma? It's a punctuation

  • mark. When you have sentences, there's a time to take a breath or to complete it. Okay?

  • Now, periods, you may know, end sentences or ends thoughts. A comma sometimes gives

  • us a breath or it gives us a pause between parts of a sentence, or gives you time to

  • catch your breath, or get part of an idea. Okay? We also use it for lists. There's Frank,

  • okay? Frank, Billy, John, Susie, you know, lists. Lists of things. Knives, forks, scissors,

  • dah, dah, dah, and you'll have comma, comma, comma, separating them, keeping them individual.

  • And finally, we can also... Well, there's more uses, but these are general. We can use

  • them for numbers, large numbers. You know this, we can say 1,000, there'll be a comma

  • to indicate 1,000, and two commas to indicate 1,000,000. So largers... Numbers larger than

  • 1,000, you'll have commas somewhere. All right? That's basically what the comma is used for.

  • Three different uses.

  • So, what are fanboys? Well, I told you they're excited about everything, right? Well, there's

  • a little bit more than that. They're conjunctions. If we look here, I wrote "conjunction", and

  • I put exactly what a conjunction is. It means to join something together. In this case,

  • when we have usually conjunctions, we join two ideas together. If we use a conjunction

  • with a comma, normally you're going to have clauses, and the clauses will be balanced

  • or equal. Okay? Later on we'll go into all of that, but that's what's going to happen

  • when we have usually a comma and a conjunction.

  • You know, there are clauses being used and they're balanced.

  • But: "What are the conjunctions?" you might ask. Well, let's start off with... These are

  • the basic ones. There are more, but these are the most common ones, and we use this

  • acronym which is a word made up from the first letter of each word so you have something

  • that's easy to remember, and I chose FANBOYS. And in a second, I'll reveal why. "For", it

  • gives you a reason. Why did they do this? Okay? "And" ideas that go together. Remember

  • I just said clauses that come together? I'll explain a clause in a second or two. "Nor"

  • it's also ideas that go together, but they're negative. Right? So if "and" is two things

  • that are positive, "nor" is negative. "But" is for contrasting, so: "I like this, but

  • I don't want this." Or an exception: "You can go, but your friend can't go." Right?

  • Exceptions. "Or", it gives you a choice. You can go for this, or you can go for that, or

  • you can go for that. "Or", right? You can have this or that. "Yet" is similar to "but",

  • and "so" gives you a result. We were tired, so we went home. Okay?

  • Now, I do want to go back up to here, because see, we've taken this and I've made an acronym.

  • "Fanboys are loyal and follow their object of affection". Object of affection is love,

  • things they love. Okay? Now, I'm giving you a small hint on how the grammar works. You'll

  • have a comma, then the conjunction. Right? Comma Girl, that's our superhero, and Fanboys.

  • And I made this video because I am a fanboy. You should have known this by the other Batman

  • videos. I've done 50 million of them. Time to go to work. And in saying that, if I can

  • get this shirt off... We'll be back...

  • [Snaps] All right, let's go. So we talked about Fanboy is following mysterious Comma

  • Girl, right? So let's get back to our story. I explained some things, but we didn't put

  • it together. I mean, why call it a love story? I'm going to tie the love story into the grammar

  • to make it clear for you, all right? Because now you know what Fanboy means, and it's an

  • acronym, you know what a comma is supposed to do. And I think I mentioned it before,

  • and I just want to make sure I hit it again, I told you that those were three uses, when

  • we talk about numbers, we talk about giving pause, or doing lists. That's three. There's

  • seven or more things you can use commas for, and those are just three I threw out at you,

  • because we want to keep this lesson simple. Right?

  • So, let's go to our idea, here. So: How is it a love story? How do we know it's a love

  • story? Well, we talk about "coordinating conjunctions". I told you what a conjunction was, right?

  • "Con" and "junc", meaning together. And "coordinating" means order, so it creates an order. Right?

  • When two complete ideas are joined... And: What do you mean by complete idea? Think of

  • a subject and a verb. Right? We have to have a subject and a verb to complete a sentence.

  • When you have a phrase, for instance, you just have, you know, like a subject, so you'll

  • have: "A fat cat". It doesn't really go anywhere, it's doing anything. It's just about the fat

  • cat. All right? So we need a complete idea, like: "He lives here", right? So, when two

  • complete ideas are joined by conjunction... Right? We have two different ideas and we

  • put them together, we need a comma. But, in doing so, we have to make sure they're balanced.

  • That means both must be complete ideas. Right? So: "He loves ice cream, and he loves Coca-Cola."

  • Now, in that case, to be honest, when you use "and", a lot of the times the comma is

  • optional. Don't tell anybody that, because the lesson is that you have to use it. But,

  • we can use it for... Well, we have examples over here, and some down here. We'll go to

  • them now, but we can see how we have to have first a comma, then the conjunction. And this

  • is what the love story is, because whenever we have this balance and this harmony... Think

  • of "harmony", and I'm sure you can hear angels, and little fluttering of doves. Okay? Comma

  • Girl is followed by these fanboys wherever she goes; "for", "and", "but", "nor", yeah?

  • "Yet", and "so" are following her everywhere. And you'll see here, this... This Comma Girl,

  • running away, like: "You're stalking me!" And "and", and "so", and "yet", are going:

  • "But we love you, Comma Girl. We love you. We have to follow." And that's what you have

  • to do when you have two balanced sentences joined by a conjunction. What you want to

  • do is put your comma down, the first idea, and then put your conjunction, and then put

  • the second idea. Remember they must be balanced, subject and verb, complete ideas. Let's get

  • some adva... Some... Ah. Examples. Examples. Right? So, the first one: "Mr. E went to the store",

  • as you can see, "Mr. E went to the store" is a complete idea. Okay?

  • "He bought a bicycle", that's a complete idea. "He bought a bicycle." What did he do?

  • He bought a bicycle.

  • But seeing as we're doing a conjunction and comma lesson, we're going to slip that comma

  • in, and there's little Comma Girl. So: "Mr. E went to the store, and he bought a bicycle."

  • Remember we said "and" is when we want to do in addition? He went to the store, in addition,

  • he bought a bicycle.

  • Next: "Tia moved to a new city", okay? Complete idea. Comma Girl, and then we have "so" there:

  • "so she got a new apartment". Okay? "She got a new apartment" is a complete idea.

  • "She got a new apartment". "So" is a result because if you live in one place and you go to a new

  • place, you can't live in the same place, you got to get a new place. "So she got a new apartment".

  • The result is that, and there's Comma Girl and our conjunction. All right?

  • And third... E, I know you wrote this. Every time he leaves, something goes on the board.

  • This wasn't "James" to start off with, but we'll say it's James. "James is a stupid man

  • for leaving this on the board"-Comma Girl-",

  • yet, he married a smart woman". "He married a smart woman"

  • a complete idea. "James is a stupid man"-I didn't say that-also, a complete

  • idea. We have "yet" as the conjunction, and there's Comma Girl, once again, being followed

  • by her fanboy. All right? It's a great relationship. It always works, it always happens. Always,

  • always, always, as you can tell. Believe me, it always happens.

  • Remember: don't say "always", because as soon as you say "always", you are wrong. What?

  • I didn't finish reading in red, like blood. "However, even the best relationships can break up."

  • What do you mean? Comma Girl and Fanboy won't be together forever?

  • "No. If the conjunction joins a complete sentence with a sentence fragment, no comma is needed."

  • Let me redo that for you again in English. You see, if the conjunction joins a complete

  • sentence and a sentence fragment, which is like a phrase, it might be: "A fat cat", "a

  • big car", these are not complete ideas, then you don't need a comma. Comma Girl and Fanboy

  • will break up. [Cries]. It's true. Comma Boy... Fanboy is like: "We don't need you, man. I'm

  • a conjunction alone. Alone with my thoughts and myself, just joining two things together.

  • And Comma Girl, I kiss you off. I'm a Fanboy. This hurts. I'm going to be alone." So, here's

  • an idea or now here's... Here is a complete sentence, and you'll notice I got Batman in

  • again. All right? "Mr. E is going to buy a Batman", comic, okay? I didn't put that in

  • there. I was running out of room, trying to save space and save the planet. Okay? So he's

  • going to buy a comic, he's going to buy a Batman comic. That's a complete idea. "Or

  • a Superman comic". "A Superman comic" is not an idea; it's a thing. Okay? So we're joining...

  • And I'll put "comic" because I know there are those purists there. I know it doesn't

  • look like much, don't worry, it's just "comic", because I don't want you going on engVid, going:

  • "You didn't write 'comic'. It's not a complete idea." Okay? So:

  • "A Batman comic or a Superman comic".

  • This is not a complete idea, so you don't need a comma. Notice how

  • it's unbalanced? We looked up here, we said: "If it's balanced with a conjunction, comma."

  • Down here, we say: "No comma", why? A complete sentence is an idea, it's heavy by itself.

  • The sentence fragment is too light. It doesn't balance it out. It just flows away. Okay?

  • Now, I hope you like that explanation and my shirt. And the... It's an E true story.

  • It's true. It happened. Fanboy, Comma Girl.

  • Anyway, test. Quick test, as you know. How about the first one we're going to look at?

  • "Mr. E likes to eat hamburgers and pepperoni pizza." Comma, no comma?

  • No, tricked you.

  • "Pepperoni pizza", man, it's just describing a pizza. It's not a sentence. It's just a...

  • It's a pepperoni pizza. It's very good, mind you, but sorry, no relationship.

  • Comma Girl and Fanboys are out right now.

  • Let's see if we're going to go for our next swing at bat, what happens?

  • "James has not been to Barcelona nor has he lived in London.",

  • "James has not been to Barcelona", I could put a period. That's an idea.

  • "He has lived in"... "Nor has he lived in Barcelona". Hmm. Hmm, "he has not",

  • "nor has he lived in Barcelona". Yes, has he lived

  • in Barcelona? He's lived in London. Oh... I guess I could do this, right?

  • Hey, you're good. Give you time, you can figure these things out.

  • What about the last one? This is a tough one. "Alena likes ice cream but it gives her gas.",

  • "Alena likes ice cream"... "What is gas?" you say? Sorry, excuse me I had a lil', little

  • gas, little gas. Woof, woof. Sorry. Okay: "She likes ice cream but it gives her gas".

  • What does that mean? Well, that's an idea, "it gives her gas", that's an idea, and we

  • have, I said this is a conjunction. Where does the conjunction go? It goes here. Ah,

  • sucker. Tricked you. Remember: our conjunctive boys love to follow our beautiful Comma Girl.