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  • In this American English pronunciation video, we're going to talk about places.

  • In this video, we're talking about trips we've taken recently. Notice how we use phrases

  • like 'for work', 'for fun', 'for school' when talking about a trip. 'For' is one of those

  • words that's often reduced (to 'fer'). You'll also hear several idioms.

  • So Annie is our dear, dear friend visiting from Denver. Denver. Now, my voice went up,

  • Denver, because I was making a pause but not done with my thought. But normally, that word

  • would be said 'Denver'. Stress is on the first syllable, and the -er ending, unstressed,

  • as always, must be very short: -ver, -ver, -ver. Denver.

  • >> Now, where were you before you came here? >> Um, I was in Boston.

  • Boston. Another two syllable city name with stress on the first syllable. So the second

  • syllable, unstressed, must be short to contrast the length and shape of the first syllable. Boston.

  • >> Annie, now, where were you before you came here?

  • >> Um, I was in Boston. >> For work?

  • >> Yes, indeed. >> Umm-hmm.

  • >> There was a minor hiccup with a situation with a badge where I was not allowed access.

  • >> Wait, hold on, I love your use of the word 'hiccup' here. Now, can you explain it? What

  • do you mean by hiccup? >> Um, there was a situation which was not

  • ideal, it was a bump in the road. >> Bump in the road. Now that's a---that's

  • also an idiom. Could you explain that? >> It was really what I would call a hurdle

  • that I had to jump. >> A hurdle.

  • We're laughing because sometimes it's hard to explain an idiom without using another

  • idiom. A hiccup. A bump in the road. A hurdle to jump. So a hiccup or a bump in the road

  • is something that comes up that was not planned. So, during her new job orientation, there

  • was a hiccup. A hurdle to jump, meaning there were some unforeseen difficulties that she

  • had to deal with. Listen again to this string of idioms.

  • >> There was a minor hiccup with a situation with a badge where I was not allowed access.

  • >> What do you mean by hiccup? >> Um, there was a situation which was not

  • ideal, it was a bump in the road. >> Bump in the road. Now that's a---that's

  • also an idiom. Could you explain that? >> It was really what I would call a hurdle

  • that I had to jump. >> A hurdle.

  • >> And you were---you had this hiccup in your new job orientation.

  • >> Yes. >> How excited are you though for your new

  • job? >> I'm excited. Um, it's a great opportunity,

  • um, just such an amazing experience to meet some new people. This is all very genuine.

  • Um, um yeah. >> I may or may not be putting you on the

  • spot.

  • To be put on the spot, or, to put somebody on the spot. This is an idiom that means to

  • ask somebody to do something or make a decision without preparation, and maybe in front of

  • other people. In this case, I'm putting Annie on the spot because I'm asking her to talk

  • about something in front of the video camera with no preparation. Here the T in 'put' is

  • a flap T, or a D sound, because it comes between two vowels when we link the words together.

  • Put on the spot.

  • >> Putting you on the spot. Could you explain that idiom?

  • >> Um, that means that you are the focal point. You are really---there is a certain amount

  • of pressure. >> And there was no preparation, maybe.

  • >> Hot seat. Hot seat. No preparation. It's spontaneous, it's, um...

  • >> You didn't know you were going to be asked to speak.

  • >> Yes. >> Now, the other idiom you came up with

  • was 'hot seat'. >> Yes it was.

  • >> Can you make up a sentence with 'hot seat'? >> Man. I hate being in the hot seat when

  • topic turns to something I am not quite comfortable answering.

  • >> Yeah. Shall I take you off the hot seat? >> Please do, Rachel.

  • >> Now Katherine, you were saying earlier that you've been on a trip recently.

  • >> Yes, I went to Baltimore. >> I thought you went to DC?

  • >> I went to DC too.

  • Two more place names. Baltimore. Stress is on the first syllable, so that should be the

  • longest. After the stressed syllable, the voice will come down in volume and pitch.

  • So the last syllable: -more, -more, -more, will be quick, low in pitch, and low in volume.

  • Baltimore. With DC, it's just the opposite. Stress is on the last syllable.

  • Any time you're naming

  • something by a list of letters, like DC or HBO or MLK, stress is always on the last letter.

  • So that letter will be the longest and have the most shape. DC, C, DC.

  • >> So, tell me a little bit about that trip. >> To DC?

  • >> Well, either one. >> Um, well, I went to a college in DC. Um,

  • and I looked at a fashion show, and looked at portfolios, and ... um...

  • >> So this was for work. >> This was for work.

  • >> Well thanks for telling me about your trips to Baltimore and DC.

  • >> We were just talking, I went to India. >> Oh you did? Recently?

  • >> About four years ago. >> Was that for work or for fun?

  • >> For fun. >> What did you do there?

  • >> I studied Buddhism and Tibetan community politics.

  • >> That sounds like it's for school. >> It was for school, but it was, ah, I took

  • a semester off from college to go.

  • >> Renee, and, I hear that you took a trip last weekend.

  • >> I did. >> Where did you go?

  • >> I went to upstate New York. >> Nice.

  • >> Town called Hudson, on the Hudson River. It was actually---are you interested in why

  • it was founded? >> Yes.

  • >> It was founded by whalers who originally whaled in Nantucket. But they decided to move

  • their families up the Hudson River to another place that would still be on the water.

  • >> Why did they want to move their families away from Nantucket?

  • >> I don't remember that part of the story.

  • >> Sara, where were you last weekend? >> I went to visit my sister's family in Virginia.

  • >> Virginia. That's a fun state name. >> It's a great state.

  • >> Where did you go? >> I went to Florida.

  • >> Florida. Is that where you're from? >> That's where I'm from!

  • >> I know, but you're from further north, and I'm from further south.

  • >> I know. What did you do there? >> Spend time with my family at my parent's

  • house. Went in the pool. I went to the beach a bit, walked at sunset. And that's about it.

  • >> That sounds lovely. Guys, thank you, everybody,

  • for telling me about the places that you've recently been.

  • >> Absolutely. >> Oh, we were so happy to share.

  • >> Really appreciate it.

  • >> Katherine. >> Yes?

  • >> If you were going to work on your American English pronunciation---let's say you already

  • know some of the concepts, you've seen some videos, but you want to really work it, to

  • get it into your habit. What would you do to do that?

  • >> I would take the Rachel's English video class.

  • >> Do you mean the Rachel's English online course in July and August?

  • >> I'd take the Rachel's English ... >> Ok, who can keep a straight face in here?

  • Because she can't, and she can't.

  • To keep a straight face is to be able to do something without laughing. Something my friends

  • clearly have a difficult time doing, which is why we have so much fun together. Take

  • two.

  • >> Katherine. >> Yes.

  • >> If you felt like you wanted to work on your American English pronunciation this summer,

  • what would you do? >> I would take the Rachel's English course

  • in July and August. >> That sounds like a very smart woman. If

  • you didn't know, I am giving an online course in July and August of 2012. Check out my website

  • for more details.

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

  • Don't stop there. Have fun with my real-life English videos. Or get more comfortable with

  • the IPA in this play list. Learn about the online courses I offer, or check out my latest

  • video.

In this American English pronunciation video, we're going to talk about places.

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B1 中級 美國腔

地方和成語 美國英語發音 (Places and Idioms! American English Pronunciation)

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