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  • [MUSIC]

  • We've been connecting our environment to the Internet since the Internet's

  • been around, but I think that the reason why it's becoming so exciting now is that

  • effectively smartphones have basically commoditized this wonderful stack of

  • technology from processing to memory to communications that.

  • Now it's so cheap we can take a little mini smartphone stack and

  • embed it in all sorts of things in our houses, in our cars, on our bodies.

  • And so now we can literally make computing environments that live in our homes.

  • We can turn our office building into a compute environment.

  • And that means there's a UI for how you interact with your office building.

  • There are APIs for

  • how other technologies can get information from the office building.

  • In order to sort of have the Internet of Things be as interesting as it is,

  • it not only needs the smart sort of stack of technology on the processing and

  • networking side, but you also need a lot of sensor technology.

  • [MUSIC]

  • I've been fortunate to have worked with a couple of, I think,

  • some of the more exciting early successes in the Internet of things.

  • One of the more well know ones is Nest.

  • And so, Nest is the really incredible team who built the Apple iPhone and so these

  • guys really knew how to, not only to make a really intelligent, smart, connected

  • devise, but also how to make something that really appeals to consumers.

  • And the smart thing they did, is they said that the thermostat shouldn't just

  • be a dumb switch on your wall, it's going to be a sensing, intelligent, connected

  • smart phone that manages your temperature and all sorts of things in your house and

  • they put some sensors in this product that allowed them to determine are you home or

  • not and can we take action based on the occupancy of your home.

  • And if you're not home, this is a relatively simple idea, but

  • if you are not home, we are going to turn up or down the temperature.

  • So if it's the winter, we're going to go ahead and let the house cool down, and

  • then when you come home, we'll detect your home and

  • we're going to heat it up for you.

  • And so it's just some of this, again, smart detection and

  • understanding of occupancy.

  • And then some really basic learning technologies

  • that allows them to sort of predict and react and understand consumer preferences,

  • but then makes the device really work for the customer.

  • So it's not adding complexity, it's really simplifying your life.

  • [MUSIC]

  • The way I think about it is I feel like it's sort of the next frontier of

  • innovation.

  • And if you look back historically at waves of innovation in Silicon Valley,

  • they're very pretty clearly defined by there's a big hardware innovation,

  • whether it's hard disk drives, or PCs, Internet networking equipment.

  • And then that enables a really long period of software innovation

  • on top of that big leap forward in hardware platforms.

  • And so for me, the internet of things is kind of that next new platform area.

  • Post the iPhone, the smartphone and the tablet ecosystem.

  • And so right now what we're seeing is a little bit of the Wild West.

  • People are trying to figure out so what's the standard look like?

  • What are the communication standards?

  • And you know to complicate things there isn't sort of one specific

  • instantiation of this platform, there's lots of different things.

  • So in a net of things it's going to look very different in a residential situation

  • versus an industrial situation and so I see this as the super, super early days.

  • And this is a period that's going to last for quite some time.

  • Another way to think about this is in the really beginnings of new

  • areas of innovation, you tend to see very vertically integrated companies.

  • Companies that If I'm going to make a smart thermostat,

  • I have to do everything, because this is a new part of the industry.

  • And so, everything from the firmware to all the hardware to the software,

  • and so, these are really big undertakings.

  • And then over time as more companies find success, there will be pieces of

  • the tech architecture that get picked off and turned into services and

  • then we'll start to see sort of this horizontal technologies.

  • For example, one that I think makes a ton of sense to sort of horizontalize

  • sooner rather than later is that this notion of I want to connect

  • something to the new internet like a on demand Wi-Fi connection or an on demand,

  • almost like a whisper net as a service kind of thing.

  • So I suspect that we'll start to see some companies that go after these technology

  • layers but it's hard to lead with that when it's still the wild west and

  • people don't really understand.

  • What are the killer apps?

  • How are consumers going to be interacting with these things?

  • What really gets me excited as an investor in the Internet of

  • Things is I think it enables some really interesting new business models.

  • So one company that I'm on the board of is called Enlighted and

  • it's easiest described as sort of Nest for commercial buildings.

  • And they put a sensor at every light in the building.

  • And these sensors allow them to control energy use on lighting based on occupancy,

  • but then they can also do things like controlling HVAC,

  • they can understand the occupancy of the buildings themselves.

  • And then they can do a lot of other things around security and

  • space planning and so when you take a step back what's exciting about what

  • the technology enables is that by putting in this hardware sensing platform you're

  • getting some proprietary new data that you otherwise wouldn't be able to get.

  • And then once you have this data you can then build this series

  • of software applications that provide different insights to the business

  • owner around different areas of their business.

  • And so ultimately I'm really intrigued by Internet of Things opportunities,

  • where again the hardware is purely unlocking some more information buried

  • around us that then enables us to then build really valuable software businesses.

  • [MUSIC]

  • That's where we have to be just really careful about how we implement these

  • things, and we want to implement the right amount of data to be able to take

  • action and do the right things for the customer, but not too much,

  • where we cross any kind of line.

  • Now we're self limited when it comes to Internet of Things, because if you're

  • outfitting 100,000 square feet of floor space with sensors, guaranteed, you're

  • actually being really selective about what data you're actually bringing back.

  • And so, again, it's just about being very targeted and

  • focused on the specific applications.

  • And so you're not just collecting all types of data for data's sake.

  • [MUSIC]

  • In enlighted situation, frankly the big site really is occupancy and

  • understanding how people are using buildings, but

  • occupancy is harder to understand than you'd think.

  • And right now you've got these very basic occupancy sensors that everyone's familiar

  • with in their office.

  • Where after 10 minutes of not moving the lights go off and

  • you're like, I'm still here.

  • [LAUGH] And so the problem with those sensors is they're pretty low resolution.

  • And so the key is how do you find sensors that really understand

  • there's a human who's sitting in the office who's sitting very still.

  • And so getting a lot of better granularity around sensing is really important,

  • and that's part of again, the technology embedded in the Internet of Things.

  • But once you have really good high-resolution data around occupancy,

  • you can really, dramatically change how the building operates.

  • And one of the things we talk about with this Enlighted company is we're helping

  • redefine the future of the at work environment.

  • So when you come into your office, it knows you're there, it's adjusted for you,

  • the light's set to your level, the temperature's set to your temperature.

  • There's a bunch of things that can be accommodated to ultimately make it

  • a better work experience for the person who's in that office.

  • But, then for the company themselves, what we've shown so far that when we install

  • these sensors in the lights we save 50 to 70% of all lighting energy.

  • Dramatic, dramatic energy reduction simply by just shaving off lighting usage

  • when people aren't actually using rooms, and just very simple things like that.

  • We can also do similar,

  • not quite as much savings, but similar things around energy as well.

  • So the environmental implications of this kind of Internet of Things

  • deployment is massive and doesn't put the customer out in any way.

  • So I love the fact that, as a customer, you're not sacrificing for

  • the lights to control and turn off when you're not in a room.

  • And so it's just the building being much much smarter about how it's being used.

  • [MUSIC]

[MUSIC]

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特雷-瓦薩洛:物聯網的未來。 (Trae Vassallo: The Future of the Internet of Things)

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    richardwang 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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