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  • >> Hi. This is a tutorial on, when do you use quotation marks,

  • and when do you use italics?

  • First want to say this isn't using quotation marks

  • with dialogue, when people are talking.

  • This is for a lot of other situations, like books, songs,

  • magazines -- do you use quotation marks?

  • Do you use italics?

  • That's what this one is about.

  • So start off by just taking a moment and think,

  • when might you use quotation marks?

  • When might you use italics?

  • Do you know the difference between the two of them?

  • I also want to point out something before I go on.

  • When I say "italics," this replaces underlining.

  • You can't have italics and underlining at the same time.

  • It's one or the other.

  • Okay, now I'll give you some samples in a grid/table form,

  • and you decide which ones are in quote marks,

  • which ones are italicized.

  • Okay, take a look at these eight and decide what you want to do

  • for a book, for a short story -- and as you can see,

  • there's an example for each of these --

  • for a magazine, an article, a song, a CD or an album,

  • the name of the entire thing,

  • name of a film, or a scene in a film.

  • Okay, so hit Pause, make a decision

  • about what you would do with those.

  • And also, start to think if you're finding any kind

  • of pattern, or is it just random and haphazard?

  • Okay, do you have your answers?

  • If not, hit Pause, give yourself a little bit more time,

  • because I'm going to put all the answers up at once right now.

  • And here they are.

  • Those items that go in italics are books, magazines,

  • the CD or the album name, the name of the entire film.

  • Those that go in quotation marks are short stories, articles,

  • song titles, scenes that might be in a film or in a TV program.

  • Alright. Now, with that said,

  • are you finding any pattern going on here?

  • Well, there is a pattern.

  • Not all the time, but enough that it's worth noting,

  • that when it comes to quotation marks,

  • those items are often the smaller items

  • that can fit inside of a larger item.

  • These over here are the names

  • of all the songs on The White Album.

  • This is the name of The White Album.

  • Over here is the name of the chapters in a book

  • or the small poems in a book, or the articles in a book;

  • and this is the name of the book.

  • So often the pattern is, the smaller things are in quotes;

  • the thing that encases them all or captures them all,

  • the bigger thing, that's in italics.

  • Now, again, that's not always the case, but quite often it is.

  • Now, here is a list of other items

  • that sometimes are italicized, sometimes in quotation marks.

  • Make a decision on these: a newspaper, foreign words,

  • the titles of holy books, TV programs, ships, aircraft

  • or spacecraft, websites, a long poem or a short poem.

  • Take a moment, hit Pause,

  • decide which ones you think are italicized, which ones are

  • in quotes, and perhaps the reason why.

  • And the answers are, well, as you can see,

  • just about all are italicized.

  • Now, notice one thing isn't.

  • Look at number three.

  • For holy books, notice how they are neither italicized

  • or put in quotes.

  • The idea, the theory is that these books are so special --

  • Bible, the Koran, the Bhagavad Gita, the Torah --

  • that they are in their own special category.

  • Alright? And the only other exception here is, number nine,

  • the shorter poem is in quotation marks.

  • A poem that is long enough that it is a book or nearly a book,

  • like Paradise Lost, like Beowulf, those are italicized.

  • And as for the logic for all the others,

  • why are they all italicized?

  • Well, they all are major, bigger things, like a newspaper.

  • If there were an article inside of the newspaper,

  • that would be in quotes.

  • But most of these are just very large and cannot be subdivided,

  • like ships and aircraft.

  • They just are significant enough that they are italicized.

  • Okay, now apply all that you know about italics

  • versus quotation marks to these 10 examples.

  • Okay, hit Pause, put a checkmark

  • or whatever other indication you want,

  • and the answers are -- and here you go.

  • The items that are in quotation marks are the song,

  • and then down to number five, the short story,

  • the article, the short poem.

  • Again, these are things that are smaller, that tend to be able

  • to fit into -- and these are the things that are italicized.

  • Number two, the movie; four, the TV program; six, the aircraft;

  • eight, the magazine; and 10, the book.

  • Note the one exception that is neither italicized

  • or in quotes is number three, and that is the holy books.

  • And that's it for this tutorial on the difference

  • between quotation marks and italics.

  • Not always, but usually there is some logic behind it.

  • The smaller things go in quotes, the bigger things in italics.

  • Okay, hope this helped.

  • Bye-bye.

>> Hi. This is a tutorial on, when do you use quotation marks,

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引號與斜體 (Quotes vs. italics)

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