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  • R+L=J is a fan theory regarding George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire, the basis

  • of HBO's Game of Thrones. It's one of the best-supported and most widely believed fan

  • theories. The idea is that Jon Snow is not the bastard son of Eddard Stark and an unknown

  • woman, as Jon and most of Westeros believes, but is actually the son of Ned's sister, Lyanna

  • Stark, and Rhaegar Targaryen. So, for a bit of context, Prince Rhaegar Targaryen was the

  • son of the Mad King Aerys Targaryen, who was overthrown in Robert Baratheon's Rebellion,

  • the war that made Robert king. Lyanna is kind of the Helen of Troy of Westeros because Robert's

  • Rebellion started when Lyanna, who at the time was betrothed to Robert, was abducted

  • by or more likely ran away with Prince Rhaegar, who was already married to Elia

  • Martell. Rhaegar spent

  • the start of the war in the Tower of Joy, in Dorne, with Lyanna, before going off to battle, and to his doom, in the form of Robert's

  • hammer. So after the war was over, Ned

  • and six others headed to the Tower to find Lyanna, where they were confronted by three of the dead King's guard. When

  • the fight was over, the two survivors, Ned and his friend Howland Reed, went up the tower

  • to find Lyanna Stark "in a bed of blood". There, Lyanna got Ned to make her a promise

  • before she died. So R+L=J suggests that Lyanna's "bed of blood" is one of childbirth, the baby

  • is Rhaegar and Lyanna's, and that Ned's promise to Lyanna is to pretend that the child is

  • his in order to protect the child from Robert, who would see the son of the Targaryen prince

  • as a threat and likely have him killed, just as he had Rhaegar's wife and other children

  • killed. In any case, Ned then comes back from the war with a baby, Jon, who until his death

  • he raises as his own son in Winterfell. So that's the theory. What's the evidence

  • that makes it more plausible than the alternative, that Jon really is Ned's bastard?

  • Firstly, it seems very out-of-character for Ned Stark, a painfully honourable person,

  • to have fathered a bastard. In Ned's own words, to have fathered Jon was to "dishonor ... [himself]

  • and ... dishonor ... Catelyn, in the sight of gods and men". Ned isn't like Robert, who

  • would "swear undying love and forget them before evenfall", Ned "[keeps] his vows".

  • So right away it seems unlikely that Ned would break his wedding vows to Catelyn by fathering

  • Jon. At one point Ned refers to Jon as his "blood",

  • but he never calls him his son. At one point, he internally lists his children,

  • naming "Robb and Sansa and Arya and Bran and Rickon". The very next line he mentions

  • Jon, but not part of the list of his children. Speaking of AryaJon is said to look like

  • her, and Arya is said to look like Lyanna. Anyway, so

  • during a conversation with Robert about the Rebellion, Ned thinks that "He [has] lived his

  • lies for fourteen years". What "lies" are Ned be referring to? Here's

  • a hintJon is, at the start of the first book, fourteen years old.

  • So what all these hints amount to is that Jon is Ned's lie, a lie that "[haunts] him at night", but which he persists with, because

  • "Some secrets are safer kept hidden. Some secrets are too dangerous to share, even with

  • those you love and trust" It hurts Ned to lie like this, but he does

  • it to keep his promise to his sister, to protect his sister's son.

  • One more thing about Nedon multiple occassions, Ned opposes the killing

  • of Targaryen children. When Robert orders the assassination of Daenerys and her unborn

  • child, Ned refuses, hurting his friendship with Robert and endangering his honour and

  • life by disobeying the king. The other example is his opposition to the killing of Rhaegar's

  • wife and children at the Sack of King's Landing. This refusal to kill

  • children for the sake of their Targaryen blood is mirrored by Ned's protection of Jon.

  • To return briefly to the Tower of Joy, it

  • seems very odd for three members of the Kingsguard to be there with Lyanna Stark. Shouldn't they

  • be protecting the siblings of the now-dead Prince? A very good explanation for their

  • presence is that they were guarding the heir apparent, the son of the prince, Jon.

  • So now to Essos, for a Biggie in terms of textual evidence.

  • While in House of the Undying, in Qarth, Daenerys has a vision of "A blue flower [growing] from a

  • chink in a wall of ice, and [filling] the air with sweetness".

  • Blue flowers, specifically blue winter roses, are consistently associated with Lyanna Stark. At the Tourney

  • of Harrenhal, Rhaegar selected Lyanna as theQueen of Love and Beauty” – over his wifeand presented

  • her with a crown of blue winter roses. A storm of blue rose petals feature in Ned's dream

  • about Lyanna, and the statue of Lyanna in Winterfell Crypt has a garland of blue winter roses.

  • What this strongly suggests is that something to do with Lyanna is at a "wall of ice". That

  • something is very probably Jon on the Wall. So given all these hints, it seems

  • very likely that Jon Snow is the son of Rhaegar Targaryen and Lyanna Stark. But what are

  • the implications of R+L=J? It's been suggested that being both a Stark

  • and a Targaryen makes Jon the Song of Ice and Fire personified. What this actually means,

  • exactly, is unclear but it does seem to suggest that Jon is very important, perhaps he's the

  • Prince that was Promised, or Azor Ahai, or one of the three heads of the dragon, or any

  • of the other various prophecised figures. In any case, Stark blood is associated with

  • powers like warging, and Targaryen blood is associated with an affinity with dragons and

  • fire. Jon having both would possibly make him capable of some pretty impressive stuff.

  • A more concrete implication is that, if Jon is the son of Prince Rhaegar, he has a claim

  • on the Iron Thronemore so than Dany, actually. That's assuming, though, that Rhaegar and

  • Lyanna were secretly wedded, which could have happened despite Rhaegar's existing marriage

  • to Eliapolygamy is a bit of a thing with Targaryensbut if they weren't married,

  • Jon would still be considered a bastard, and an illegitimate contender for the throne,

  • though he could possibly be legitimised. Jon's vows with the Night's Watch are another complication.

  • He's sworn an oath to "hold no lands", to "wear no crown" – so surely he can't be king.

  • But even if he could overcome that barrier, would anyone believe his claim to the throne?

  • How could he prove his parentage? And besides, it seems doubtful that Jon would even want the Throne. Powers and thrones aside, finding out his

  • true parentage would be very significant for Jon personally. He's always struggled with rejection

  • from Cat, alienation from being a bastard, and the difficulty of not knowing his mother.

  • Finding out his true parentage would undoubtedly be a big deal for him, if not for all of Westeros.

  • So that's R+L=J – the main evidence, and some of the possible implications. Let me know

  • in the comments what you think of the theory, and whether you'd like to see more videos

  • on A Song of Ice and Fire fan theoriessome of which are pretty crazy and awesome.

  • If you're interested in A Song of Ice and Fire fan theories and discussion, you

  • might like to check out westeros.org, the wiki, and the subreddit.

  • That's all from me. Thanks for watching this video.

R+L=J is a fan theory regarding George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire, the basis

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R+L=J:瓊恩-雪諾的父母是誰?[S1/AGOT大破壞,S2/ACOK小破壞] 。 (R+L=J: who are Jon Snow's parents? [S1/AGOT major spoilers, S2/ACOK minor spoilers])

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    Ray Du 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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