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  • Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you seven test expressions.

  • Okay? So, seven expressions that have to do with exams, finals, tests, quizzes, whatever

  • you call them. So this video is very useful to you if you are in university or college,

  • in high school, if you're taking the TOEFL or the IELTS, and also if you just want to

  • learn some expressions for when you talk about when you were in school. Okay?

  • So, without further ado, let's talk about these seven expressions. The first expression:

  • "Procrastinate". Okay? This is a very long word that actually has a simple meaning. Procrastinate.

  • If you procrastinate, this is the first thing you do before you do a test. Procrastinate

  • is where you don't study right away. For example, maybe you're very stressed about your test

  • and you just don't want to study, so maybe you watch a movie, maybe you hang out with

  • your friends, maybe you go to the bar. Maybe, like me, you spend a lot of time on Facebook

  • or Twitter instead of actually studying for your exam. So, when you procrastinate, it

  • means that you are not studying. In fact, you are doing everything but studying. Okay?

  • So we call this "procrastinate". And we don't just use this for exams and tests. You can

  • also use this word when it comes to projects, assignments, taxes; anything where you need

  • to do work and you really don't want to do the work, so you do something else instead.

  • Okay?

  • So let's look at our example sentence. "Facebook helped me procrastinate." So before my test,

  • I went on Facebook, I didn't study, I procrastinated. Okay? And because this is a long word, let's

  • just practice pronunciation. Pro. Okay? So say this with me. Pro. Procras, procras. Procrastin,

  • procrastin. Procrastinate. Procrastinate. And you'll notice the "cras", procrastinate,

  • is the loud part. Okay? If you are a person who always procrastinates, you, my friend,

  • are a procrastinator. Okay? You are a procrastinator. A procrastinator is a person who always procrastinates.

  • So let's look at the next expression. If you have been procrastinating, and you've had

  • weeks and weeks to study for your exam but you didn't, then this is when you might have

  • to pull an all-nighter. Okay? "Pull an all-nighter." What does this mean? Well, I want you to look

  • at this word here, "night". So, when you pull an all-nighter, it has to do with nighttime.

  • It's where you study the whole night. You do not sleep, so no sleep. All you do is study

  • all night. You might do this if you have an exam or a test the next day. You will stay

  • awake all night studying. This usually happens after procrastination. Okay? So, pull an all-nighter.

  • Pull an all-nighter.

  • Let's look at an example sentence. A very simple sentence, but: "Last night, I pulled

  • an all-nighter for my math test." I stayed up all night studying. I pulled an all-nighter.

  • It's a little bit of a strange expression, because we have the word "pull" an all-nighter.

  • It's a little strange, but very, very common.

  • The next word: "cram". Okay? So here we have a verb, "cram". "Cram" is similar to "pull

  • an all-nighter", although you can cram for weeks, so the time here is a little different.

  • When you cram, it means you study very, very hard. It's like you are studying all day,

  • all night. You're just always studying, and you're studying a lot in a very short time.

  • You might have a week to cram, you might have two days to cram. Okay? So it's not always

  • one night; it can be a week, a couple of days, but you're trying to put a lot of information

  • in your head. You're trying to learn a lot in a short time. So, before a test, you will

  • have to cram. You will have to study hard. "Study hard" and "cram" are synonyms. Okay?

  • So let's look at an example. "I have crammed a lot for the test.", "I have crammed a lot

  • for the test." This means I have studied hard for the test. I've studied for the past two

  • weeks for this test. I've crammed. I've filled my head up with all this knowledge.

  • Okay, the next expression: "Burn the midnight oil". "Burn the midnight oil" is very, very

  • similar to "pull an all-nighter". Okay? Again, we have this idea of night, midnight. If you

  • burn the midnight oil, it has nothing to do with oil. Okay? Maybe historically, yes, but

  • nowadays, if you say you burn the midnight oil, it means you stay up all night, just

  • like an all-nighter and you pretty much study or you do something all night, working hard.

  • Okay?

  • So here is an example sentence. Tomorrow I have a math test. So: "Tonight I will burn

  • the midnight oil.", "Tonight I will burn the midnight oil." So, tonight I will stay up

  • all night, I will pull an all-nighter. I will burn the midnight oil. Okay? And the reason

  • I need to do the... Pull an all-nighter and burn the midnight oil is because I procrastinated.

  • So now let's look at some things that happen if you procrastinate or if you cram. Okay?

  • So let's look at some more expressions. Okay, so you have procrastinated, you have crammed,

  • you have pulled the all-nighter, you have burned the midnight oil. You've taken your

  • test. So now what happens? Well, you find out your grade. Okay?

  • So, we'll start with the worst case scenario; the worst thing that can happen. On your test,

  • if you "flunk" your test... This is a synonym for the word "fail". Okay? And notice the

  • unhappy face. If you flunk your test, this will be you. You will not be happy. Okay?

  • So it is a verb, and here is an example of this sentence. "I flunked the test." Now,

  • I've written a little "F" here because in American and Canadian systems, we sometimes

  • give grades like "A", "B", "C", "D", "E" and "F". "F" is the worst possible grade you can

  • get, so if you flunk, you fail, you will get an "F". So it's a very bad mark.

  • Okay, so we've started out with the worst. Now let's look at something more positive.

  • If you "pass with flying colours"... This actually has nothing to do with the word "colour".

  • If you pass with flying colours it means you did great on your test; you got a very high

  • score. So, if you pass with flying colours, you'll have a big smile; you'll be very happy.

  • You did well. So: "I passed", and this, if you can guess, is in the past tense because

  • of the "ed". "I passed my test with flying colours." And so, in the American or Canadian

  • system, this would mean you got an "A" or an "A+". You did very, very well.

  • Similarly, sometimes we talk about the word "kill". And usually, you might think "kill"

  • like "enh, enh", very negative. Right? In this case, it is not negative. If you kill

  • an exam, it's a great thing. It means you have aced it. You have done excellent. You

  • have gotten a great score. So, again... Actually, you know what? If you kill, you'd be very

  • happy. Yeah. Okay, kind of ruined his eye. Okay. Maybe you won't look like this, you'll

  • look... Okay, if you kill it, you will be very happy.

  • So, here is an example sentence: "I killed it. I killed my math exam." I did great. I

  • got an "A". Okay? So it has the same meaning as "passed with flying colours". Same meaning.

  • Finally... So, we've now looked at the worst and we've looked at the best. What about in

  • the middle? Well, we also have this expression: "Pass by the skin of my teeth". Okay? It's

  • a very strange expression. "Pass by the skin of my teeth". This means that you have just

  • passed. If 50 is, you know, a fail, anything below 50 is a fail and you passed by the skin

  • of your teeth, it means you got a 51%. You just passed. You almost failed, but you got

  • one mark so you didn't fail. So this is almost fail, but you did pass. Okay?

  • So, for example: "I passed by the skin of my teeth." This refers to either maybe a mark

  • of a "C" or a "D". If you get a 51%, you passed by the skin of your teeth. Okay?

  • So, I hope you use some of these test expressions. They're very common. Especially "procrastinate",

  • "flunk", "cram". If you go to any university campus, any college campus, you will hear

  • these expressions. They're also very common on TV shows about university and college,

  • or about high school. So, I hope you do well on all of your tests. I hope you do not procrastinate.

  • I hope you are not a procrastinator. I hope you don't pull all-nighters, because they're

  • not good for you. And I also hope that you always pass with flying colours, and you kill

  • all of your tests.

  • If you want, you can take our quiz at www.engvid.com. There, you can actually maybe pass with flying

  • colours. You can try to use these expressions, and make sure that you understand them all.

  • Okay? So come visit us at www.engvid.com.

  • Also, feel free to subscribe to my YouTube channel.

  • And until next time, I will see you later.

Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you seven test expressions.

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學習英語:8個TEST & EXAM表達式。 (Learn English: 8 TEST & EXAM Expressions)

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    Lo Koop 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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