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  • Hello everyone, this is Andrew at Crown Academy of English. Today we are doing a lesson on how to agree with people.

  • And in particular, I am going to teach you how to say that something is the same for you or for somebody else. Okay? So let's get started.

  • So, here is a friend of mine called David and David and I are having a conversation.

  • David says "I am going to the cinema."

  • And I say "So am I."

  • Now this means that I am saying to David that I am going to the cinema too.

  • Alright? I am also going to the cinema.

  • I can also say "So is Jane." and that means I am telling David that Jane is also going to the cinema. I am agreeing with him.

  • "I can play the piano."

  • "So can I."

  • "So can my brother."

  • "I have been to London three times."

  • "So have I."

  • "So have my parents."

  • "I am hungry."

  • "So am I."

  • and "So is Mark." Ok?

  • So this, on the right, this is the grammar structure that I want you to learn.

  • And to form this structure, we must look at the structure of the first sentence.

  • So we must look at what David is saying.

  • And if you notice, everything that David is saying. Everything is in the AFFIRMATIVE.

  • So since it is in the affirmative and we are agreeing with him then we must start our sentence with the word "So". Ok?

  • "So" means that we are agreeing with someone in the affirmative.

  • And we can also notice that in David's sentence, there is an auxiliary verb.

  • This is the auxiliary verb, the verb "to be" and it goes... it is in front of the main verb.

  • So since David uses an auxiliary verb, we must use the same auxiliary verb when we reply.

  • So we must also use the verb "to be" and we put it after the word "so".

  • And the verb "to be", it must agree with the subject that we are using.

  • So here, the subject is "I" and so we put the verb "to be" in the first person singular... which is "am"

  • So that is how we have "So am I"

  • And for Jane, it is "So is Jane."

  • Okay it's the same auxiliary verb, the verb "to be" but this time our subject is Jane. Now Jane is the third person singular.

  • So we put the verb "to be" in the third person singular which is "is"

  • And it's the same for the others.

  • Here is the auxiliary verb "can" and so we use "can" in our reply and again, we make it agree with the subject.

  • "can"

  • "I have"

  • "So have I."

  • "So have my parents."

  • "I am hungry."

  • "So am I."

  • "So is Mark."

  • Ok, so the rule is: When we are agreeing with an affirmative which has an auxiliary verb,

  • then the form is: "So" then the auxiliary verb and then the subject. Okay?

  • So that is the first rule. Now let us look at the second rule.

  • Similar situation. Here is Caroline.

  • I am talking to Caroline.

  • Caroline says "I like watching television."

  • I say "So do I."

  • "So does Mark."

  • I want to go to London."

  • "So do I."

  • "So does my brother."

  • "I eat bread with every meal."

  • "So do I."

  • "So do my parents."

  • "I walked to University today."

  • "So did I."

  • "So did Mark."

  • Ok, again, this is the grammar structure I want you to learn.

  • Again, Caroline is talking in the affirmative and so we always use the word "so".

  • But this time, Caroline does not use any auxiliary verbs. She only uses main verbs. Alright?

  • So since there are no auxiliary verbs, in our reply, then we use the verb "to do."

  • And again... the verb "to do", we make it agree with the subject.

  • Alright? So here, the subject is "I" and so we put "do" in the first person singular .

  • Here, it is Mark is the subject and so the third person singular of "do" is "does"

  • That is why we say "So DOES Mark." We do not say "So do Mark."

  • So "do", "does",

  • "So do I", "So does my brother."

  • "So do I.", "So do my parents.",

  • "So did I." - Now this one is a little bit different. This time we use the past participle because Caroline used the past tense.

  • She said "I walked". So we have to put the verb "do" in the past tense. So that is why we say "So did I." - The past participle.

  • And it's the same when we talk about Mark: "So did Mark."

  • Alright, so the rule here is - When we are are agreeing with an affirmative without auxiliary verbs,

  • then we say: "So", then the verb "to do" and then the subject. Ok?

  • Here is Peter. I am talking to Peter.

  • Peter says "I am not going out tonight."

  • "Neither am I."

  • and "Neither is Jane."

  • "I can't hear the music."

  • "Neither can I."

  • and "Neither can Mark."

  • "I have never been to London."

  • "Neither have I."

  • "Neither have my parents."

  • "I am not hungry."

  • "Neither am I."

  • and "Neither is Sarah." Alright?

  • So here, this is the negative. So Peter is using the negative in all of his sentences.

  • And we are agreeing with him. So when we want to agree with somebody who is using the negative,

  • then we start the sentence with the word "neither". Alright? That is pronounced "neither"

  • And then, it is exactly the same as the first rule.

  • So Peter is using auxiliary verbs and so we must also use auxiliary verbs in the correct form. In the correct conjugation. Okay?

  • We must make the auxiliary verb agree with the subject.

  • "Neither am I."

  • "Neither is Jane."

  • "can", "Neither can Mark."

  • "have", "Neither have I.",

  • "Neither have my parents."

  • and "Neither am I." and

  • "Neither is Sarah."

  • So we are agreeing again with Peter.

  • Peter is using the negative and we agree with him.

  • We are saying "I am NOT hungry as well." okay? And "Sarah is not hungry." So we say "Neither is Sarah."

  • So the rule here is - When we are agreeing with a negative which has auxiliary verbs,

  • then we say "Neither", then the auxiliary verb, then the subject.

  • Okay? Now the last rule. This is the last and number four.

  • Here is Clare. Clare and I are talking.

  • "I don't like tennis."

  • "Neither do I."

  • "Neither does Mark."

  • "I don't want to go home."

  • "Neither do I."

  • "Neither does my sister."

  • "I never drink alcohol."

  • "Neither do I."

  • and "Neither do my parents."

  • "I didn't walk to work today."

  • "Neither did I."

  • and "Neither did Mark."

  • So again, Clare is using the negative in all of her sentences and when we agree with a negative, we start with the word "neither."

  • And then, her sentences do not use any auxiliary verbs.

  • And so with our reply, we use the verb "to do" and we put the verb "to do" in the correct form to agree with the subject.

  • So "do", "does", "do", "does".

  • So again, a reminder, "does" is the third person singular of the verb "to do".

  • "do", "do"

  • And the last two, we say "did" and again, it is because the original... (sorry) ..the original sentence was in the past tense.

  • Okay? Clare said "I didn't walk to work." This is the past tense and so we use the past participle in our reply.

  • So here, the rule is - When we are agreeing with a negative without auxiliary verbs,

  • then we say "Neither", then the verb "to do" and then the subject.

  • Ok, now for an exercise.

  • Question one: I would like you to choose two famous people who have things in common. Who have something in common. Two famous people who are similar.

  • Now my example would be two famous footballers. Two famous football players. English football players called David Beckham and Alan Shearer.

  • And then I would like you to write a sentence in the affirmative which shows that they are similar.

  • So for my example. This is my answer:

  • "David Beckham scored many goals and so did Alan Shearer."

  • So this is in the affirmative. And this is saying that Alan Shearer did the same as David Beckham.

  • And question three: I would like you to write a sentence in the NEGATIVE to show that they are similar. This time, I would like you to use the negative.

  • My example. My answer is: David Beckham no longer plays football and neither does Alan Shearer.

  • So here, because it is the negative, we are using the word "neither" to compare Alan Shearer with David Beckham.

  • But those are MY answers. I would like to know what your answers are. I want YOU to do the exercise.

  • And I would like you to write your answers in the comments of the video. Okay?

  • So below the video, there is the comments section. and I would like you to do...answer these three questions and you write your answers in the comments.

  • And I will reply to you in the comments to tell you whether your answer is right or wrong.

  • Okay? So as I said, it's below the video. It's underneath...

  • and so... you can do it now if you like. If you would like, you can pause the video now and you can write your answers in the comments.

  • and I promise I will reply to all of you to tell you if you are right or wrong. Okay so if you want to do it now, you can pause.

  • And if not, you can perhaps do it later.

  • But that is now the end of the lesson so thank you very much for watching.

  • This is my Twitter account if you would like to follow me on Twitter.

  • And here are two other videos which might be of interest to you. This one is a listening exercise and this one is another grammar lesson.

  • Alright, thank you very much for watching. My name is Andrew at Crown Academy of English. Thank you for watching. Bye bye :)

Hello everyone, this is Andrew at Crown Academy of English. Today we are doing a lesson on how to agree with people.

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A2 初級 英國腔

英語中的 "同意 "一詞怎麼說|文法課 (How to agree in English | Grammar lesson)

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    陳震寰 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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