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  • In this American English pronunciation video, you're going to join me at my friend's wedding

  • on a beautiful farm, and study the pronunciation of the word 'wedding' and other two-syllable words.

  • Today I'm at the wedding of one of my very best friends. Her name is Laura, and you have

  • seen her previously in the video where we made a pumpkin pie. The word 'wedding'. It's

  • a two-syllable word, so we have one stressed, and one unstressed syllable. The word begins

  • with the W consonant sound, so the lips will come into a tight circle for that. Then the

  • jaw has to drop a good bit for that EH as in BED vowel. We-, we-. Then we have the D

  • consonant sound opening up into the ING. Now, that's the unstressed syllable, so it's going

  • to be lower in pitch, pretty quick: -ding, -ding, -ding. So, the tongue tip starts here

  • for the D, quickly comes down for the IH, and then the back of the tongue makes contact

  • here for the NG. Make sure the tip of the tongue does not come back up, that would be

  • an N ending. Common mistake. We want the NG back here. Wedding wedding.

  • Every 2-syllable word in American English will have one stressed and one unstressed

  • syllable. So, one will be longer and have shape in the voice, and the other will be

  • short and flat, and low in pitch. To make both syllables the same length is not correct

  • and ignores the rhythmic structure of American English. Speaking with an American rhythm

  • is key to sounding natural. Wedding. There I've made both syllables the same length,

  • and all the sounds are correct---wedding---even so, it will not sound right because it does

  • not have the correct rhythmic structure of one long and one short syllable. Wedding.

  • Long-short. Wedding. Let's study more two-syllable words.

  • Today I'm at the wedding of one of my very best friends. Her name is Laura, and you have

  • seen her previously in the video where we made a pumpkin pie.

  • Here, we have several 2-syllable words. Today. Stress on the second syllable, so the first

  • must be very short. To-, to-, to-day, -day, today. Listen again.

  • Today I'm at the wedding... [3x]

  • Today I'm at the wedding of one of my very best friends.

  • Very: stress on the first syllable. So, the second syllable is very short

  • and flat: -y, -y, -y, ver-y, ver-y, very, very. Listen again.

  • ...of one of my very best friends. [3x]

  • ...of one of my very best friends. Her name is Laura.

  • Laura, stress on the first syllable. Laur-a, Laur-a, Laura.

  • Her name is Laura. [3x]

  • Her name is Laura, and you have seen her previously in the video where we made a pumpkin pie.

  • Pumpkin. Stress on the first syllable. Pump-kin, pump-kin. Pumpkin, pumpkin. Listen again.

  • A pumpkin pie. [3x]

  • So this is my good friend Liz, also here for the wedding. Hey Liz!

  • >> Hi, hi, hi friends.

  • Also: stress on the first syllable. Al-so, al-so, also, also.

  • Also here for the wedding. [3x]

  • ...also here for the wedding. Hey Liz! >> Hi, hi, hi friends.

  • >> Liz came in from Pittsburgh.

  • Pittsburgh, a great city in Pennsylvania. Stress is, again, on the first syllable. Pitts-burgh,

  • Pitts-burgh. Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.

  • >> ...came in from Pittsburgh. [3x]

  • >> ...came in from Pittsburgh. Now, Liz, tell me how you know Laura.

  • >> Um, Laura is a college friend of mine.

  • College: stress is on the first syllable. Coll-ege, coll-ege, college, college.

  • >> Is a college friend of mine. [3x]

  • >> Laura is a college friend of mine, so I met her freshman year, first year of college,

  • when I met you, as well.

  • Freshman, stress on the first syllable. Fresh-man, fresh-man. Freshman.

  • >> Freshman year, first year... [3x]

  • >> Freshman year, first year of college, when I met you, as well.

  • >> Right, but didn't you meet her because of a specific activity?

  • >> Yes. Laura and I played tennis together.

  • Tennis. Stress on the first syllable. Ten-nis, ten-nis, tennis, tennis.

  • >> Laura and I played tennis together. [3x]

  • >> Laura and I played tennis together. >> Yes.

  • >> Yes we did. Um, and, uh, were we doubles partners? I don't think we were ever doubles

  • partners.

  • 'Doubles' and 'partners'. In both of these words, stress is on the first syllable. Dou-bles,

  • dou-bles, doubles. Partners. Part-ners, part-ners. Partners. Doubles partners.

  • >> Doubles partners. [3x]

  • >> Weddings are good for holding babies.

  • Holding and babies. Again, first syllables are stressed in both of these words. Hold-ing,

  • hold-ing, bab-ies, bab-ies, holding babies. Listen again.

  • >> ...for holding babies. [3x]

  • >> This is brother-in-law of the bride. What do you have on your plate there?

  • >> Peach pie and vanilla ice cream. >> That sounds delicious. How is it?

  • >> It's, it's delicious, it's a wonderful combination, complements each other ...

  • >> Just like Laura and Mark. >> Just like Laura and Mark.

  • >> There we go. >> Yes.

  • Speaking of Laura and Mark, traditionally at weddings, the bride and groom will have

  • a first dance alone together.

  • >> Well, guys, thanks so much for letting me use my video camera here at your wedding,

  • and sharing your special day, document it for the Rachel's English community!

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

In this American English pronunciation video, you're going to join me at my friend's wedding

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B1 中級 美國腔

婚禮! 美式英語中的2個音節單詞重音介紹 (Weddings! 2-Syllable Words Stress in American English)

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    nini 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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