Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • 95% of American workers said they planned to look

  • for a new job in 2024.

  • Money's a big part of this. 45% of American

  • workers say they need a higher income.

  • Job switchers increase their salary more quickly,

  • on average, than those who stay put.

  • In February 2024, people who stayed at their job

  • for more than three months increased their

  • salary by 5.1% year-over -year, whereas those who

  • switched jobs increased by 5.9%.

  • I ended up almost doubling my salary after a year and

  • a half, and then from there, each year, I

  • probably increased my salary from anywhere to

  • $15,000 to $35,000 or $40,000.

  • But hiring professionals stress that it's important

  • to be strategic about job moves.

  • You don't want to rise up the ranks too quickly and

  • then be this expensive head that's sort of easy

  • to chop in any kind of downturn.

  • I think companies do expect an unrealistic

  • level of loyalty, but unfortunately we're at

  • their whim a lot of times, right?

  • So we do have to play the game, and that game is

  • making it seem like you're going to spend the

  • rest of your life there. They really do want to be

  • lied to you.

  • So how long is the optimal amount of time to stay at

  • your job for your career advancement, salary, and

  • your well-being?

  • The survey data about why people leave their jobs is

  • pretty consistent across the board.

  • Ranking at the top of the list are wanting a higher

  • salary and not feeling like they have room for

  • growth at their current job. The desire for higher

  • salaries may lead people to job hop, which is when

  • a worker jumps from job to job within a short

  • period of time.

  • Oftentimes, switching companies is the fastest

  • way to get to that next level role in terms of

  • seniority and in terms of your income level.

  • And the reality behind that is in your current

  • company for you to get promoted, for you to get

  • to the next level, that position needs to open up

  • in a way that it's either someone leaves or they get

  • promoted or the company is growing.

  • Gen Z is 36% more likely than other generations to

  • prioritize advancement opportunities.

  • Even if there are opportunities for

  • promotions within their current workplace, they

  • may still find it easier to leave.

  • A lot of employers are reaching out to people and

  • recruiting them.

  • Workers have more negotiating power that

  • way. You can also find out more easily what wages

  • are available just by, you know, going on

  • ZipRecruiter and looking at job postings, whereas

  • perhaps finding out what the opportunities are

  • within your company involves sort of an

  • uncomfortable conversation with your

  • manager.

  • Other common reasons for leaving are to get better

  • benefits to escape a toxic work environment,

  • and for better work life balance.

  • The ancillary thing is, if I pay people more, would

  • they be happier?

  • If that were true, then investment banks and

  • private equity firms law firms would be the

  • happiest places in the world to work.

  • They notoriously aren't viewed that way because

  • there's a certain way that you treat people,

  • whether it's benefits or whether it's time off or

  • compensation or, quite frankly, just how you

  • treat people on a day in and day out basis with

  • interpersonal skills.

  • Those are the things that end up being more

  • important.

  • Workers also have career aspirations that may not

  • be fulfilled in their current positions.

  • Early in my career, I always had the goal of

  • eventually working for myself. So I told myself

  • around the age of 30, try and get enough experience

  • and exposure to the things that are required

  • to have a consulting firm.

  • So each job that I've worked, I've always left a

  • company, if I felt like I had already obtained the

  • skill that I needed to obtain. And if I wasn't

  • getting opportunities to obtain the skills that I

  • needed, I went to the next place.

  • As humans, we tend to change every 2 to 3 years

  • in terms of our goals, our priorities, our stages

  • of life. And now the younger generations ask

  • themselves, well, how does my career serve me

  • and not the other way around?

  • There's never a wrong reason to want to leave.

  • If you want to leave, you can leave, right?

  • But you have to be smart about leaving.

  • Americans consistently stay at their jobs for a

  • median of 3 to 4 years.

  • In 2022, the median tenure was 4.1 years.

  • In 2002, it was 3.7, and back in 1983 it was 3.5

  • years. But breaking those numbers down by age paints

  • a clearer picture about how long Americans should

  • stay at their jobs.

  • Between 2002 and 2022, workers aged 20 to 24

  • typically stayed at their jobs for less than one and

  • a half years. As you look at older workers, the

  • median tenure increases with each age group.

  • I think a lot of people think of job hopping as

  • being generational, but it's actually more driven

  • by age than generation.

  • So our parents generations at the same

  • age as young people today, a lot of the data

  • shows that they quit at very similar rates.

  • A Bureau of Labor Statistics study found

  • that American adults born between 1957 and 1964 held

  • an average of 12.7 jobs between the ages of 18 and

  • 56, with nearly half of those jobs held before the

  • age of 25.

  • I think the idea that you have to stay at one

  • company for an extended period of time comes most

  • probably from our families and our parents,

  • because their expectation and their version of

  • success was to stay within one company, or at

  • least within one career, their entire life.

  • Our parents would get pensions, they would work

  • for a company for a certain amount of time,

  • retire and be paid for the rest of their lives.

  • So the incentives have shrunk and so the loyalty

  • is just not there.

  • Another thing to consider is a lot of benefits

  • accrue over time. So if you switch companies too

  • quickly, you could be leaving money on the

  • table. For example, some employers won't allow you

  • to keep your 401(k) match until you've been there

  • for a certain number of years.

  • I see a huge wave of Gen Z and millennial

  • professionals asking themselves: is this job,

  • is this career right for me?

  • And what do I want for my career to look like and to

  • feel like and where do I find this career?

  • Versus feeling like I have to stay doing what

  • I've been doing in my career.

  • Recruiters say there's more leeway for job

  • switching earlier in your career.

  • Gen Z can do that right now because they're in

  • their early 20s, but when they get to their late 20s

  • or their early 30s.

  • They can't be moving like that. You're 22 years old.

  • You're not making any career mistakes right now.

  • There are so many places that you could go, and

  • none of them would be a mistake. Because you're so

  • young and you have so many years to figure out

  • what you want to do.

  • When you're 35, not really right?

  • Ideally, you're in your career and you're making a

  • good salary with great benefits.

  • And once you have that, you need to be more

  • strategic and intentional about those moves that you

  • make, because now you can make a really bad career

  • mistake.

  • Instead of asking how long you should stay at your

  • job, career experts suggest shifting your

  • focus to how much you've accomplished. I think the

  • biggest risk with job hopping or leaving your

  • job too early is you not understanding where you

  • are in your development.

  • And that's why I try to tell people remove your

  • focus on money, especially if you're being

  • compensated okay, and you're able to pay your