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  • This is The English We Speak, with me Feifei.

  • And I'm Rob.

  • Hey, Feifei, you know this is the programme

  • where we teach an authentic English phrase?

  • Yes, Rob.

  • Well, I just wondered if today, we didn't. We did something else?

  • No! We have to teach an English phraseno ifs or buts.

  • But if we sang a song for a change, it might be more fun.

  • No ifs or buts.

  • We're here to teach English, and that's the phrase we're teaching this time.

  • Oh, but couldn't we just...

  • No ifs or buts, Robno compromises!

  • When we say to someone 'no ifs or buts',

  • it means there is 'no negotiation, no compromise, and no excuses' —

  • it just has to be done.

  • It can also mean there is 'no doubt'.

  • Hmm, and do we have to have some examples?

  • No ifs or buts: we do.

  • No ifs or butsyou have to be in bed by ten o'clock.

  • We've all got to work really hard to complete this project by the deadline

  • no ifs or buts.

  • No ifs or buts, this is the best restaurant I have ever eaten at.

  • In this The English We Speak from BBC Learning English,

  • we're talking about the phrase 'no ifs or buts',

  • which can be said to mean 'no negotiation, compromise or excuses' —

  • what has been said has to be done.

  • It can also mean there is no doubt.

  • So, Rob, no ifs or buts: we are here to teach an English phrase.

  • OK, I've got itno singing, no dancing, just teaching.

  • Rob, if you want to do some dancing, go ahead,

  • but we should invite everyone to come and watch.

  • Hmm, you're right, no ifs or butslet's stick to teaching an English phrase.

  • Very wise. And no ifs or buts, we have to go now.

  • Bye. — Bye-bye.

  • The English We Speak.

  • From BBC Learning English dot com.

  • Hello, and welcome to The English We Speak. I'm Feifei.

  • Argh!

  • And I'm Rob. Ah, Halloween!

  • I love Halloween, Feifei. Are you looking forward to trick or treating?

  • No fear!

  • No fear? You mean yes, fear! Halloween's all about fear!

  • That's what I don't like about it.

  • What's not to like? There's ghosts and witches and jack-o'-lanterns!

  • Come on, Feifei! Get on your broomstick and let's go!

  • No fear, Rob!

  • Why do you keep saying 'no fear', Feifei? You're kind of missing the point.

  • No, you are missing the point, Rob.

  • 'No fear' is an expression which actually means 'certainly not', 'no way'.

  • Ah, I get it.

  • So, by saying 'no fear', you mean 'absolutely not'.

  • That's right. Let's hear some examples before my legs turn to jelly.

  • Fancy that Justin Bieber concert?

  • Pff! No fear! I can't stand him.

  • Why don't we stay in tonight and watch golf on the TV?

  • Golf?! No fear. I'd do anything other than watch golf.

  • This is The English We Speak from BBC Learning English.

  • We're learning the expression 'no fear', which means 'absolutely not', 'no way'.

  • So come on, Feifei, fear is fun. Let's go trick or treating!

  • No fear, Rob!

  • Yes, fear! — No fear.

  • Actually, Rob, what's that thing behind you?

  • What thing? — Don't move!

  • But it's just reaching out a bony hand and about to touch your shoulder.

  • Ohh, I'm outta here. Argh!

  • Well, at least that gets me out of Halloween for another year. Bye!

  • The English We Speak,

  • from the BBC.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak. I'm Jiaying.

  • And hello, it's me, Neil.

  • Neil! You're wearing a dressing gown to work!

  • You look ready to go to bedno cap!

  • Ah, thanks, Jiaying.

  • I'm trying to look really relaxed today, so I put a dressing gown over my suit!

  • And of course I'm not wearing a cap!

  • It would look strange with a dressing gown. Why would you say that?

  • No, Neil! I said "no cap"!

  • We say 'no cap' when we want to reinforce

  • that what we are saying is the absolute truth.

  • Ahh, so you think I look relaxed then, in my dressing gown?

  • Well, I actually said you look like you're heading to bed,

  • but you do look very relaxed.

  • I'm not sure it's the best thing to wear at work. No cap!

  • Oh, dear, perhaps I should take it off and just stick to the suit.

  • I think I might look a bit too relaxed.

  • Good idea! You can do that while we listen to these examples.

  • No cap: they're amazing!

  • That new song is the best thing I've ever heard! No cap!

  • No cap, you're the funniest person I know. You always make me laugh!

  • I don't like those mushrooms. No cap, they taste awful.

  • You're listening to The English We Speak from BBC Learning English,

  • and we're talking about the expression 'no cap'.

  • We use 'no cap' to mean 'no lie' and to say something is the truth.

  • Yes. We can also say 'capping' to mean 'lying'.

  • By the way, did I tell you that I won the lottery?

  • Stop capping, Neil! You didn't win the lottery.

  • I'm not capping. I won the lottery, no cap!

  • So, if you won a million pounds, why are you still working?

  • Wouldn't you rather be on holiday?

  • Well, first off, I love my job, no cap. I'd do it even if I won the lottery.

  • And secondly, I didn't say I'd won a million pounds!

  • True! How much did you win?

  • £2! I used it to buy that dressing gown from a charity shop, no cap!

  • Ahh, well, congratulations on your big win! Bye, Neil.

  • Bye.

  • Hello, I'm Jiaying and this is The English We Speak.

  • And hello, I'm Neil. Are those new jeans, Jiaying?

  • Yes, they are! Do you like them? I'm not so sure about them.

  • They're not a patch on my old ones.

  • Well, I was going to say, you probably do need some patches.

  • They're covered in holes!

  • The holes are supposed to be there, Neil.

  • It's fashionable to have holes in your jeans these days.

  • Ah, right. So why are you talking about patches?

  • I was using our expression for this programme.

  • If something 'isn't a patch on' something else,

  • it means it's 'nowhere near as good as the thing you first mentioned'.

  • I see.

  • So, it's not connected to the word 'patch',

  • which means 'a textile cover for something which is damaged'?

  • That's right. I'm saying my old jeans were much better than these new ones.

  • Let's hear some examples of this expression in action.

  • My new phone isn't a patch on the old one.

  • The camera is rubbish.

  • I know some people disagree,

  • but, for me, the Olympics isn't a patch on the World Cup.

  • Football is way more exciting!

  • My holiday at home wasn't a patch on a trip abroad.

  • Overseas travel is so much more fun.

  • This is The English We Speak from BBC Learning English

  • and we're talking about the expression 'not a patch on something',

  • which is used to say that one thing is not as good as another.

  • Neil, what are you doing with that knife?

  • Oh, I'm just cutting some holes in my jeans

  • you know, to be more fashionable, like you.

  • That looks terrible and, if you're not careful, you're going to cut yourself.

  • You're right, Jiaying.

  • These types of holes in jeans are really not fashionable, are they?

  • No. In this case, I think you really do need some patches.

  • Bye. — Bye.

  • The English We Speak.

  • From BBC Learning English dot com.

  • Hello. Welcome to The English We Speak. I'm Jiaying.

  • And hello, I'm Neil.

  • Hey, Neil, have you heard what Roy has planned for our Christmas party this year?

  • Oh, no, not axe throwing again?!

  • Maybe not. We did it last year.

  • This year, we're doing karaoke at our Christmas party.

  • Roy is already practising singing some songs by Ariana Grande!

  • I do not like the sound of that!

  • What's wrong? Do you not like the sound of Roy's singing?

  • No, I mean, I don't like the idea of doing karaoke.

  • When you 'don't like the sound of something',

  • it means you 'don't like something you've been told or read about'.

  • I've got it. Well, hopefully, Neil, you'll like the sound of these examples!

  • We've been told to start work an hour earlier. I do not like the sound of that.

  • I don't like the sound of that new shopping centre.

  • It's going to increase the amount of traffic around here.

  • I didn't like the sound of Enrique's camping trip.

  • It involved walking ten kilometres with our tents!

  • This is The English We Speak from BBC Learning English

  • and we're hearing about the expression 'not like the sound of something',

  • which means 'you don't like something you have been told or read about'.

  • So, Neil, why don't you like the sound of doing karaoke?

  • I can't sing!