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  • - There are over 14,000 identified varieties of mushrooms.

  • Today, we're gonna go over

  • some of the most commonly found, rare, and delicious

  • edible mushrooms.

  • We're gonna be slicing dicing, frying, and tasting.

  • Oh, my God!

  • Over 15 types of mushrooms.

  • [upbeat music]

  • Okay, since there is so much to consider,

  • we're going break it down into chapters,

  • to try to keep things simple.

  • In chapters one and two,

  • we're going to break down some of the most common

  • edible mushrooms,

  • like the ones that you're most likely to encounter

  • in your market.

  • We'll take a look into what makes each category unique,

  • and cook some delicious dishes to show you

  • the best ways to utilize them.

  • In chapter three, we'll be looking at even more mushrooms,

  • and compare them to some that I've been growing at home.

  • We'll also talk about mushrooms as a meat substitute,

  • and make some delicious king trumpet steaks.

  • And in our final chapter,

  • we'll talk about some specialty mushrooms,

  • like this black truffle.

  • Chapter one, The Big Three.

  • Here we have three of the most common mushrooms,

  • white button, cremini and portobello.

  • Combined, these three mushrooms

  • account for over 90% of mushroom consumption,

  • but that's not all.

  • The secret truth about these mushrooms

  • is that they are all the same mushroom.

  • [crowd gasps]

  • That's right,

  • portobellos are just mature criminis,

  • and white buttons are just the young, white version

  • of criminis.

  • Even though these three mushrooms

  • are technically the same species,

  • they can have different uses.

  • So let's get into what makes them each unique.

  • White button aka champignon.

  • He's so cute.

  • It's one of the most cultivated varieties in the world,

  • and has been grown for centuries.

  • These grow in the dark,

  • and they were believed to have first been grown

  • in the catacombs beneath Paris.

  • So when you're buying white buttons in the store,

  • you'll probably find them in a package like this.

  • If you're not cooking with them right away,

  • take them out of the package and put them in a paper bag.

  • This will help them breathe and get ventilation.

  • Man down!

  • So when you put them in the refrigerator,

  • you can even leave the paperback open,

  • so that the air flow can circulate,

  • and that they don't get slimy and mushy.

  • If you leave them in an airtight container for a few days,

  • like I did,

  • they start to get slimy,

  • and they'll also bruise.

  • They'll get brown spots

  • from where the moisture is starting to come out.

  • It'll just accelerate them breaking down and rotting.

  • So you wanna let them breathe and have plenty of space.

  • It is very common as a topping on pizza,

  • where you'll just see it sliced

  • and then scattered over the top,

  • and baked on top of the pizza.

  • They can be eaten raw, as long as they're clean,

  • and they don't really taste like much,

  • but they have a very spongy kind of texture,

  • that's kind of firm, has a little crunch to it,

  • but not a ton of flavor.

  • So these are white buttons that have just been roasted,

  • with a little oil and salt.

  • You can see the color deepens

  • as the moisture content starts to come out

  • and they shrivel up a little bit.

  • Mm.

  • It does concentrate their flavor,

  • a lot more of that, kind of like deep caramelized flavor,

  • but still on the milder side.

  • Cremino aka Baby Bella.

  • So these are crimini.

  • This is a cremino,

  • kind of like octopus and octopi.

  • I don't think that's a thing.

  • [elevator music]

  • When purchasing these mushrooms,

  • check under the cap to see if the gills are covered.

  • Typically, covered gills means that they'll have

  • a more delicate flavor.

  • The gills are these thin structures just underneath the cap.

  • The purpose of the gills is to create

  • and release spores for reproduction.

  • As you cook white buttons,

  • they start to get darker and turn brown anyway,

  • when the water starts to leech out.

  • So, unless you need that white color shaved raw on a salad,

  • feel free to use crimini for any use

  • that you would use white buttons for,

  • that's cooked anyway.

  • It tastes just like a white button,

  • spongy texture, firm, a little crunch to it,

  • but still very mild.

  • And look, without the outer layer,

  • it even looks like a white button.

  • These are portobello or portobella.

  • The name means beautiful door in Italian.

  • No one's really sure where it came from.

  • Some people say it was a marketing gimmick

  • that came about in the '80s, to make it sell better,

  • because it wasn't as popular as its smaller siblings.

  • And it worked.

  • Nowadays, these are incredibly popular.

  • Compared to the crimini,

  • these gills are much longer and very well-defined.

  • You always wanna check the gills on mushrooms like this,

  • to make sure that they're not holding any dirt,

  • or particles of sand, or twigs in between,

  • because that can really get caught in there.

  • Because of this shape and size,

  • they're great to use as buns,

  • as a bread replacement,

  • or you can do what I'm about to do and make mini pizzas.

  • [bright music]

  • So we're gonna make some mini portobello pizzas,

  • using the mushroom cap instead of a pizza crust.

  • So, first thing we're going to do is just

  • pop off the stem here.

  • We're just gonna scrape these out, using a spoon.

  • It's like a drum.

  • Instead of washing these in the sink,

  • we're just gonna wipe them off with a damp cloth,

  • just to remove any dirt that might be

  • on the outside of the cap.

  • Now we're ready to cook.

  • So we're just gonna start with a little bit of oil,

  • and we're gonna sear the mushroom gills side down first.

  • We're gonna let it soften,

  • and as it cooks, then we'll start pressing on the mushroom

  • to press out any of the excess moisture.

  • As it loses water,

  • it'll start to shrink a little bit.

  • And this you definitely want to do on high heat,

  • because you want the moisture to evaporate

  • as soon as it comes out of the mushroom.

  • It's kind of like searing a piece of meat.

  • This is like the size of one of those,

  • like Pizza Hut personal pan pizzas from back in the day.

  • See all that liquid?

  • That's probably about half of the volume that it was before,

  • maybe a little bit more than that.

  • All right, we are ready to top it.

  • So we're gonna start with our tomato sauce,

  • add a little bit of fresh basil.

  • This is freshly grated mozzarella.

  • We're gonna grate a little bit of Parmesan,

  • then we're gonna bake it in the oven,

  • until the cheese is bubbling and golden brown.

  • [bright music]

  • Nice.

  • So this was in the oven for about 10 or 15 minutes at 375,

  • just until the cheese is melted

  • and bubbling and golden on top.

  • And now we're gonna top it with a little bit of fresh basil