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  • Do you ever notice that moment

  • where you've won over that prospect?

  • But, on the other hand, have you ever seen the look

  • on their face when you just clearly lost them?

  • There is truly a psychology to selling effectively.

  • Yet most salespeople don't know exactly

  • what they're doing correctly that's making people

  • more attracted to them, versus incorrectly

  • that's actually repelling prospects away from them.

  • In this video I'm going to show

  • you the psychology of selling.

  • The 13 steps to selling that actually works, check it out.

  • (clicking)

  • Number one, drop the enthusiasm.

  • This is probably my biggest passion

  • in this sales training space is getting salespeople

  • and to drop the enthusiasm, to drop the excitement

  • when they're in front of prospects.

  • Your prospects don't like it, they don't enjoy it.

  • They don't feel good about it

  • because it doesn't seem real, right?

  • If I go up to you, just forgetting

  • a sales situation, but let's just say I come up

  • to you at a networking event, right?

  • And I come up, and I introduce myself.

  • And I say, hi, my name's Marc, it's nice to meet you.

  • Right, simple introduction.

  • What if on the other hand I come up and I say,

  • hey, Marc Wayshak, how are you?

  • You're immediately like, what, that feels weird.

  • And then, when you add it into a selling situation,

  • immediately your prospect is going to be repelled.

  • It actually is caused by a psychological phenomenon

  • called reactance, where when we're clearly trying

  • to push someone in one direction

  • they're going to resist, they're going to pull back.

  • So we want to drop that enthusiasm,

  • and instead just be real, be genuine.

  • Number two, they don't want the pitch.

  • Some very recent data showed that one

  • of the biggest reasons that prospects

  • and buyers don't ultimately choose to do business

  • with a salesperson is that they felt that the salesperson

  • didn't really understand their needs, their concerns.

  • Yet, what most salespeople are doing is when they first meet

  • that prospect they're coming in with that pitch.

  • They're coming in with all of the reasons why someone

  • should do business with them in the first place

  • when we don't actually know if it's a fit.

  • We haven't done that proper discovery

  • to understand what's really going on.

  • So what your prospect really wants

  • at the end of the day is they want to be engaged

  • in a conversation about what's going on,

  • what's really important to them.

  • And what those challenges actually look like to them.

  • And then, if based on that conversation

  • they still feel like it's a fit, now it's presentation time.

  • Now it's time to present what that solution looks like.

  • Think of it almost as a doctor's type of a conversation.

  • You go to the doctor, and the doctors are not saying,

  • hey, we have this incredible new procedure, right?

  • Instead, they're just saying, hey,

  • tell me where are you feeling that pain?

  • What's going on, help me understand, right?

  • It's a two-way dialogue, and it's not about the pitch.

  • Number three, pressure is a no-no. (laughs)

  • Now, growing up we would always use

  • the term no-no, that's a no-no.

  • And I still think about pressure

  • in sales as the same idea here.

  • It's that we don't want to be putting pressure

  • on prospects because it's a no-no.

  • Because it is such a taboo, it is such a bad thing.

  • And it's not just not helpful,

  • it's actually killing the sale.

  • So what we want to do is remove

  • all pressure from the selling situation.

  • Instead of trying to persuade the prospect

  • to tell us, yes, where we're immediately

  • as a result putting all this pressure onto them.

  • Instead, we want to take a step back.

  • It's like I said earlier, there's this concept

  • called reactance in psychology where in any situation

  • when we're trying to push someone to do something,

  • and they know we're doing that,

  • they're immediately going to want to pull back.

  • Think about trying to get your kids to do something,

  • or your spouse, or someone that you know.

  • Trying to push them into something

  • that they're not really sold on yet.

  • If they feel like you're putting pressure there's a good

  • likelihood that they're actually going to pull back.

  • Well, that's the exact same thing

  • with selling to a prospect.

  • If we're putting pressure on

  • they're actually gonna pull back.

  • What I suggest is you take all that pressure off.

  • And, instead, just questions to determine

  • whether there's actually a fit.

  • Number four, it's about them, not you.

  • Now, again, this goes back to one of these really old ideas.

  • There was a boss that I had who used to say

  • prospects listen to one radio station.

  • And that one radio station is WIIFM.

  • Now, do you know what WIIFM stand for?

  • It's what's in it for me, that's what prospects care about.

  • They don't care about you,

  • they don't care about your offering.

  • They don't care about your products,

  • or your services, or how great your service is.

  • What they care about is themselves.

  • Is this conversation going to be, A, worth my time,

  • and, B, is their solution going to actually

  • help me solve a problem that I care about?

  • If they can't answer affirmatively to either

  • or both of those questions, then you're in trouble.

  • We've got to make the conversation about them.

  • Understanding their concerns, asking questions

  • about their challenges, the things that they care about.

  • And then, when they see that it's about them,

  • now they're going to be engaged in a conversation.

  • Because people like to talk about themselves.

  • People like to talk about their concerns, or their goals,

  • or whatever it is that they're looking to accomplish.

  • By making it about them and not your offering,

  • now we're in a position where we're much more effective.

  • Number five, get in their shoes.

  • Some really powerful data has shown

  • that top performers are much more effective

  • at taking the perspectives of their buyers.

  • So when's the last time you've really thought

  • through what's the experience,

  • what's the buying experience that my buyer goes through

  • when talking to me, or when talking to my competitors?

  • Again, I'm not talking about what's the value proposition,

  • or what's your product experience.

  • I'm talking about the actual experience of buying from you.

  • What's it feel like, what's good, what's not good?

  • Get in their shoes, start to think more like your buyers.

  • What do they care about, what are

  • the challenges that they're facing?

  • What are the reasons that they do business with you?

  • What are the reasons they do business with your competitors?

  • Understanding that, and suddenly we're now

  • really getting into the mind of our buyer.

  • So, when we talk about the psychology of selling,

  • it's literally how can we start to think like our prospect?

  • How can we really understand what they care about?

  • And then, craft our conversations

  • around what they care about.

  • Number six, we need to create value through our questions.

  • When you watch those scenes in The Sopranos,

  • if you've ever watched the show The Sopranos.

  • And you watch the conversation

  • between Tony Soprano and his psychologist.

  • It's really interesting from

  • a sales perspective as I watch it.

  • Because she's never really, the psychologist,

  • is never saying the solution.

  • Tony says he's got a problem

  • where he's concerned about this.

  • And then psychologist says, well,

  • help me understand why you say that.

  • Or, how's that make you feel?

  • Now, these aren't necessarily the exact questions

  • that we want to be using in sales.

  • But what you see is that most salespeople

  • when a prospect comes to us and says,