Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • The Spanish national team won the World Cup in 2010 and the European Championship in 2008

  • and 2012 playing a style of football that is known as tiki-taka.

  • The style was also popularised and brought to its highest version at club level by Pep

  • Guardiola’s Barcelona side from 2008 to 2012, which brought him and the club three

  • La Liga titles and two Champions Leagues.

  • Tiki-taka in its simplest form is a style based on retaining and circulating possession

  • of the ball. Described by Sid Lowe in The Guardian asthe nonsensical phrase that

  • has come to mean short passing, patience and possession above all else”, tiki-taka has

  • been seen both as a positive and negative: at its best, it generates stunning movement,

  • fluidity, and incisive attacking football of great skill; at its worst, it can be sterile

  • and tedious.

  • Indeed, the origins of the phrase may have those negative connotationsJavier Clemente,

  • an extremely pragmatic Spanish coach of Athletic Club, apparently coined the term as a criticism.

  • But it was Andrés Montes, a Spanish commentator, who brought the Basque term to a wider audience

  • during the Spain vs Tunisia game in 2006, sayingEstamos tocando tiki-taka tiki-taka”,

  • we are playing with light, quick steps.”

  • The origins of the Spanish and Barcelona obsession with possession can be traced to the influence

  • of Johan Cruyff, whose philosophy of Total Football prized possession of the ball and

  • use of space above all else. Cruyff, and fellow Dutch managers Louis van Gaal and Frank Rijkaard,

  • brought this appreciation of possession and space with them when they coached at the Catalan

  • club, marrying it to a styilistic focus inherent, but latent, in the club’s technical DNA.

  • Their influence on Pep Guardiola and a generation of players from the club’s famous La Masia

  • development complex meant that Barcelona was primed to play the style. A coterie of superbly

  • talented, but diminutive creative players also forced Barcelona’s hand, to a degree:

  • they couldn’t compete purely with physicality, but intelligent, technical players like Xavi,

  • Andres Iniestia, Pedro, and Lionel Messi flourished under tiki-taka.

  • Guardiola, the deep-lying playmaker turned tactician, said thatIn the world of football

  • there is only one secret: I’ve got the ball or I haven’t”. This mantra of keeping

  • and taking care of possession was articulated by two of his best players, Xavi and Iniesta.

  • Xavi: “I get the ball, I pass the ball. I get the ball, I pass the ball.”

  • Iniesta: “Receive, pass, offer. Receive, pass, offer.”

  • Barcelona and Spain tended to set up in the 4-3-3, the formation that seemed best suited

  • for the style and for rotation of the ball by creating overloads.

  • Because tiki-taka was more than possession for its own sake, it needed to generate chances.

  • So tiki-taka incorporated three other factors that were crucial to its success: pressing,

  • the false nine, and positional play.

  • Pressing was an obvious addition: any team which prizes possession will work extremely

  • hard to regain the ball after its lost. Again, there was a direct continuity here from the

  • ideals of Cruyff, who wanted to make the pitch as small as possible in defence, while Marcelo

  • Bielsa’s influence on Guardiola is also apparent. By choking the opposition, especially

  • when they have just won the ball backthey are at their most vulnerable immediately having

  • regained possessionpressing is the best way to regain possession and begin another

  • attacking sequence.

  • The false nine was not a new idea and weve covered it in another video, but having a

  • striker who dropped off into the space between the defensive and midfield lines caused problems

  • for markers: follow the player and you create a gap in the centre of defence or midfield,

  • leave the player and there is an unmarked attacker able to receive and pass, or receive

  • and run or shoot. This was a natural addition to the emphasis on movement inherent in tiki-taka.

  • As was positional play. Positional play is, put simply, the idea that the pitch is divided

  • into zones and that no more than two players should occupy the same line vertically and

  • no more than three the same line horizontally. Guardiola did this by painting lines on a

  • training pitch to show players what the zones were.

  • The purpose is to encourage players to find zones where they are free to receive and pass,

  • and that players should achieve a degree of almost automation in terms of finding spaces

  • and then moving as the ball moves around the pitch. This injects the fluidity and creation

  • of space that stops tiki-taka simply being an exercise in possession football, as players

  • are constantly on the move, rotating, changing, and finding space, but with a shared understanding

  • of what the purpose of this is, and how each player relates to the others.

  • This is the key aspect of Iniesta’s quotation offeringputting yourself in a position

  • to receive the ball by movingis the thing that stops tiki-taka simply being a passing

  • exercise.

  • As Jonathan Wilson puts it, “the focus was on the creation and exploitation of space,

  • generated by movement off the ball and by technique good enough that defenders could

  • be lured towards a forward before a pass would be released.” Possession was the means,

  • not the end.

  • While tiki-taka is most associated with Barcelona and Spain, not least because they shared so

  • many players, its reach went further. Guardiola has brought aspects of the style to Bayern

  • and Manchester City, while in the Premier League saw Brendan Rodger’s Swansea and

  • Liverpool sides, as well as Owen Coyle and Ian Holloway at Bolton and Blackpool. And

  • the influence of tiki-taka can now be seen in goalkeepers and defenders having to be

  • far more comfortable in possession and needing to pass the ball well.

  • Tiki-taka at its best was almost unplayable, before other tactics evolvedlightening

  • quick interchanges between technically gifted players employing almost rehearsed attacking

  • moves but with the added brilliance of game-changers like Messi and Iniesta. It brought about major

  • tactical changes in top level football, too, as coaches scrambled to figure out ways to

  • beat it. And it also sparked a wider interest in possession and pass completion numbers

  • OptaJoe’s popularity on Twitter is in large part to a series of tweets about Barcelona’s

  • passing and possession stats dwarfing the opposition’s – which is one of the reasons

  • that stats are now more widely understood by fans and pundits.

  • Tiki-taka had its roots in Total Football but as an evolution of that style it changed

  • the game just as much and has had lasting effects on the way football is played and

  • understood.

The Spanish national team won the World Cup in 2010 and the European Championship in 2008

字幕與單字

單字即點即查 點擊單字可以查詢單字解釋

B1 中級 英國腔

什麼是 Tiki-Taka?(What is Tiki-Taka?)

  • 4 0
    Louis Clarke 發佈於 2022 年 06 月 30 日
影片單字