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  • Mr. E was just catching up with Mr. Smith when James walked by. Mr. Smith asked Mr.

  • E, "How could you put up with that awful smell of James'?" Mr. E asked Mr. Smith if he could

  • team up with Mr. Jones and come up with a solution for the smell. You're probably going,

  • "What's with this 'with'", right? With, with, with, with, with. Well, I want to talk about

  • phrasal verbs today. I'm sure you've heard of phrasal verbs before. Or you might have

  • heard of them by this other name, "compound verb". A phrasal verb is a two to three-word

  • verb, okay? Some are separable, which means you can take some things off, and the meaning

  • is the same. We'll talk about that when we speak about "team up with". And other ones

  • are not separable or nonseparable, which means you cannot change it or the meaning changes.

  • All right? So let's go to the board and see what Mr. E and Mr. Smith and Mr. Jones -- if

  • you ever watched The Matrix, there is something in there for you. All right? What were they

  • talking about? Well, I want to talk about phrasal verbs you

  • can use. And these ones, specifically in the work place, and you'll see what I mean. Right?

  • A phrasal verb is funny because by itself, if you just look at it, it doesn't make sense:

  • "come up with", "put up with", "team up with", "catch up with". You mean, "What does it mean?"

  • Because "catch" means this, right? Put means "place". And we look here. When I put the

  • verbs, "come", it basically means when you come somewhere -- arrive or bring. It's a

  • verb. These are all verbs, right? "Put" means "place". You say this, "you put", "place".

  • "Place it somewhere." "Catch" -- sort of like "receive". Okay? And "team" -- oops. Excuse

  • me for a second. And "team" -- "team" is a noun. It's also a verb. But "team" could be

  • teaming -- like, team -- "join". I want to put "bring here, like, "come". Bring, like

  • "bring yourself". You know, they're verbs. They're hard to explain in any simple way.

  • But basically, what this is what they mean. But as soon as you add particles or prepositions,

  • don't be confused. I use both because, well, all particles are prepositions. But sometimes,

  • prepositions are not particles. Welcome to English. I just teach it. I didn't make the

  • lesson up, okay? So when we add particles -- and a particle is just this. A particle

  • is a preposition that's added to a form, as in a phrasal form verb, and it cannot be changed.

  • So parts -- think of particle as "part" of something. Right? That's it. Prepositions

  • are basically the same. They're "up", "with", "and", "on", "along" -- those are prepositions.

  • But when they are joined with phrasal verbs, we call them "particles" because they have

  • a specific meaning when they're with that verb. Okay? So just remember a particle cannot

  • be separated from the phrase its attached to, and you're good to go.

  • All right. So what are we going to do with these particular particles, "up" and "with"?

  • Well, let's start off with the story. What did I say -- what was the first thing I said

  • to you? The first thing I said to you was the following: "Mr. E was catching up with

  • somebody." What does it mean to "catch up with"? Well, when we "catch up" with someone,

  • we can, in this case -- catch up -- exchange information. "So what did you do this summer?"

  • "I went to Barcelona." "Really?" "Yeah. It was fun." Just catching up with old times

  • or catching up with old stories. There's a second meaning for "catch up", though.

  • This one you will hear usually in the past tense. "His past caught up with him." "Catch"

  • becomes "caught". Right? "His bad decisions caught up with him." You can also say in the

  • present, "These decisions will catch up with you." And that means there's going to be a

  • bad end or a consequence for something you have done already. Usually, you hear it in

  • the past tense because those bad things are here now. Sorry. So if they say, "His past

  • caught up with him", it means all the things he did before, he is now in trouble for now.

  • So watch out that things don't catch up with you. So be good. All right?

  • So that's what "catch up" means. And at work, you can say, "Look, all our bad decisions

  • for our last project caught up with us." It means, "Now, we're facing the consequences

  • of what we have done, or we're getting in trouble for what we did before." Cool?

  • What about the next one? Because we've got "catch up" -- I said "catching up with Mr.

  • Jones", right? So one was exchange of information, and the other one I just said is you can get

  • consequences for what you've done. They said, "How could you put up with?" Well, "put" means

  • "place". "Where did you put it? Where did you place it?" Yeah? So when I say, "Where

  • did you -- how do you put up with", it's not the same meaning at all. You'll notice over

  • here when we said "catch" -- we had "receive" and "increase". Let's look at "put". "Put"

  • means "place". "Increase" and "surround". Well, this is what it means. "With" means

  • "surrounded", or "up" means "increase". When you "put up" with somebody, it means to accept

  • something without complaining. If you "put up" with someone, you accept a situation without

  • complaining. "This is a bad smell. How can you put up with it?" "I plug my nose. I go

  • to work. It's not a problem." Right? "How can you put up with his bad behavior?" "I

  • just ignore him. I don't pay attention." "Put up" means to accept, no complaints. Right?

  • "So how do you put up with the dog in the house?" "I take him for a walk, or I let him

  • go in the backyard. It's not a problem." Right? "Put up with."

  • Now, what's the third one we did? The third one we did was "could we team up with". Now,

  • this is an interesting phrasal verb. Do you remember at the beginning I said there are

  • separable and nonseparable phrasal verbs? There's a reason for that. Many people will

  • say, "Can I just say 'team up'?" And yeah. You could. The general rule for a three-word

  • phrasal verb is you cannot change any of the words. But this one can be used or "team up

  • with". Now, specifically, it has to do with word order. When I say "team up with", you're

  • going to put the person or the object right away. "Can Mr. E team up with James on this

  • project?" Right? Cool? All right. So if you're asking if someone

  • can team up with something -- let me see. There. A small mistake. I'll correct that.

  • That's why I team up with this guy here. Always telling me what's going on, right? Thanks,

  • E. You got props. So where was I? So when we were talking about teaming up and I said

  • to you this is one of those, you know -- it could be "team up" or "team up with". It depends

  • on the word order. If you're putting it directly, like, "I want to team up with someone", then,

  • we'll say "with". Otherwise, you can do it in a different way. "Batman and Robin team

  • up all the time." Right? "Batman teams up with Robin." Not a big deal. But we're going

  • to follow the rule here. So remember we talked about teaming up, right? "Could Mr. -- sorry

  • -- Mr. E and Mr. Smith team up with Mr. Jones?" They want them to join. And remember when

  • we look up here with -- right? We've got "team up", "team up together". Work together. Right?

  • To improve a situation. Usually, when you "team up", you join together to make something

  • better. Okay? So we've got "team up with". And the last one was "come up with a solution".

  • Once again, "come" means, like, "bring" or "arrive". But "come up with" -- what the heck

  • does that mean? Well, we'll look at it. Come; come up with; in addition. Right? We go "in

  • addition" and "improve". So come with something in addition to make it better. "When I came

  • up with this idea" -- it's an idea we didn't have before, additional, and it's to improve

  • the situation. "So what did you come up with?" Right?

  • So I'll give you the story. I'm going to read it again. Try to work it through and think

  • about it. "Mr. E was catching up with" -- now, in this case, we're not talking about he got

  • in trouble from his past. Right? It "caught up" with him. We're saying "exchanging information".

  • Now, "Let's catch up. Let's catch up with each other in a couple hours." Right? Exchange

  • information. Modern information or new information that's happened from before. Okay?

  • Now, when we talk about "put up with", what is that? Accept without complaint. It doesn't

  • mean you love it. It just means you, in some ways, ignore it and say, "It's okay. I don't

  • really -- it doesn't bother me. I put up with it." If you're a girl and you have a lazy

  • boyfriend, they go, "How do you put up with that lazy guy who doesn't want to work?" "I

  • put up with him because I love him." Right? She accepts him. "I accept him with my heart."

  • It's acceptable. All right? Now, as I said, "team up". I love it when

  • the Justice League teams up with the Justice Society. That means nothing to you, so how

  • about this. When Barcelona -- Team Barcelona -- teams up with Team Madrid for the World

  • Cup -- I know it doesn't happen, but imagine if they worked together, they would be the

  • most awesome super team and maybe beat Brazil. Right? Not going to happen. All right? But

  • that's what we mean by "team up". "Join forces". Right? And we did "catch up". And we've done

  • "come up". "We need to come up with a plan." Well, like I came up with this lesson for

  • you. With "with", right? So we've looked at "with" or "up with". And we used it with different

  • verbs. And we've shown how even though the verb may have one basic meaning, when you

  • add particles -- or prepositions depending on your teacher -- almost the same thing.

  • When you add them together, it totally changes the meaning of the verb, okay?

  • Now, for us, what that means -- because I know; I was talking to Mr. E earlier. "Why

  • would they do it?" Well, specifically this. When you make phrasal verbs, they capture

  • a unique meaning, and it gives more richness or gives more information than just the verb

  • alone. "Come" means one thing, but "come up with" means something different. "Come" means

  • "I arrive" or "I bring something". "Come up with" means invent something new that's going

  • to prove the situation. Understand? That's why we use phrasal verbs. That's why

  • they're important. And that's why I want you to come back to EngVid because we have many

  • lessons on phrasal verbs. All right? We've got Valen, Alex-- who else do we have? Adam.

  • All these guys teaching wonderful lessons on that. I'd love you to look at not only

  • my own lessons, but theirs. All right? But where are you going to go, right I'll come

  • up with that in a second. I got it. Why don't you go to www.engvid.com, "eng" as in "English",

  • "vid" as in "video". And you can hear the siren. It's time for me to go. Right? My past

  • has caught up with me. I've been running. Five years we've been running this stuff,

  • and finally, they caught up with me. I don't know how you put up with me, but I guess the

  • gig is up. Listen, I'll team up with Mr. E another time. Anyway. I've got to go. Have

  • a great day. engVid -- click "subscribe". See you. Damn it. I knew it was going to catch

  • up with me!

Mr. E was just catching up with Mr. Smith when James walked by. Mr. Smith asked Mr.

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A2 初級 美國腔

必學!三個單字組成的動詞片語 (English Expressions: three-word phrasal verbs)

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    Ashley Chen 發佈於 2014 年 09 月 07 日
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