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  • i'm in southeast asia with my 1913 bradshaw's  handbook published at the height of european  

  • imperialism my 100 year old guy book  will leave me on a railway adventure  

  • through archipelagos and peninsulas dotted  with hills forests and paddy fields i'll tour  

  • towering mega cities and magnificent mosques i'll  encounter golden buddhas and jewelled temples  

  • and experience some of the world's most  spectacular and notorious railways as i travel  

  • through the diverse nations of this vast region  i'll learn how they asserted their independence  

  • against the british french and dutch empires to  become the economic tigers and dragons of today

  • i'm resuming my railway adventure in malaysia

  • i began in butterworth and traveled to  the lush and fertile cameron highlands  

  • before heading across country  to the capital kuala lumpur  

  • on this leg i'll continue southeast via pulau  sebang to visit malacca once one of the world's  

  • greatest trading ports i'll reach the tip of the  malaysian peninsula as i finish in johor bahru

  • on my travels i'll taste the spicy mix of european  

  • and asian food cultures my goodness  that's good spicy for you wow it's great  

  • now it's coming learn how the earliest railways  were thwarted by their most determined opponents  

  • the rail were made of timber and the the  termites has attacked the timber and as  

  • a result it just collapsed in home and savor  the bounty of the fields they're so beautiful

  • i'm picking up my rail tour  of malaysia from kuala lumpur  

  • following by bradshaw's to  the south of the peninsula

  • during the second world war japan overran  southeast asia and the front line settled in burma  

  • to supply its troops there japanese ships had to  make the long voyage around the malay peninsula  

  • passing through straits where they could be picked  off by british submarines so japan built a railway  

  • across thailand using asian civilians and  british empire prisoners of war as labour  

  • it became known as the death railway short of  steel japan lifted tracks in malaya to relay  

  • them in thailand and that explains why there's  no longer a line to my next destination malacca

  • from the capital the closest that i can get  by train to the historic port is pulau sebang

  • malacca was once one of the most strategic trading  ports in the world it's at a midpoint of the  

  • main sea route between the indian and pacific  oceans linking europe and the middle east with  

  • asia still today 40 percent of the world's trade  passes down the streets of malacca which is why  

  • over the centuries as my guidebook explains so  many great powers have wanted to control this town  

  • the portuguese held it till it came to the dutch  in 1641 it has the remains of a portuguese church  

  • it took a climb to get here but worth  it the oldest church in southeast asia

  • it's a reminder that the british were far from  the first europeans to leave their mark on what  

  • is now malaysia portuguese ships first arrived  in malacca's harbour in 1509. for the next 130  

  • years it was from this town that catholicism  was zealously carried to the inhabitants

  • and this is saint francis xavier xavier is my  third name so i'm pleased to meet the founding  

  • member of the jesuits who use this malacca as his  base to launch missions all across southeast asia

  • along with their religion the portuguese  brought to malacca their love of dance

  • it's a tradition continued  by the christian community  

  • who are the descendants of portuguese  settlers and the malay women that they married

  • hey guys sarah nice to see you michael  

  • guys that was such fun that was marvellous  did you enjoy that as much as i did

  • and what was that song what was that  dance the branu yeah it says here  

  • portuguese settlement is it a portuguese  dance yes it is traditional dance portraits

  • and where did you all learn the paranor  where did you learn um from our descendants  

  • yeah brought down from generation  to generation what does the word  

  • christian mean christian means christian yes  yes and it's also the meaning of our language  

  • is it quite like portuguese um similar  if a portuguese person came here and  

  • spoke portuguese would you understand them  would they understand you he will be able  

  • to understand us but we will not be able to  understand him because of the pronunciation  

  • now do we have one more song in us oh yes yeah  what do you got bonita sierra series the very one

  • foreign

  • sarah tell me about the christian community how  many are you we have about a thousand people  

  • here about 200 families and how do you keep the  language going you you teach the children yeah  

  • i have a class which i have every saturday andteach the portuguese dance i teach them singing  

  • i teach them cooking it's all in in krista  you mentioned cooking and i'm feeling  

  • a little peckish what can we do about that all  right when you come to my house i can teach you  

  • the famous curry that we must have for  every weddings every anniversaries birthdays  

  • every in fact every function you must have this  curry the devil curry or the table the table  

  • it's known as devil because of the spiciness  of the curry that's why it is called devil  

  • devil curry is a blend of either pork  or chicken with potatoes onions and  

  • the various spices that indicate the diverse  influences that make up the christian culture  

  • sarah you have everything ready what have we got  under here is this all portuguese influence do you  

  • think or does it have lots of other influences  too you see when the portuguese came to malacca  

  • they did not come directly from portugal they  would have stopped in goa and all that right so  

  • these are the spices that would have collected  from there since it's arrived in malaya did it  

  • continue to evolve so does it have some malay in  it as well yes there is some malay influence also  

  • mmm my goodness that's cooked nicely hasn't  it yes and now that you can put in the chicken  

  • just put it on it's okay just throw it in  

  • put it in the devil okay  now just let it simmer again

  • ready

  • sarah i have not seen much bread in malaysia  is this also part of christian culture yes  

  • it is it is part of wisdom culture because  we either eat this curry with rice or bread  

  • and how do you eat bread with curry you just  have to get a bread you stay a little bit  

  • and then you dip in dip it in and put  into your mouth eat so no knives and forks  

  • no even if we have rice people eat with your  fingers okay also chris tang custard yes very

  • my goodness that's good is it  spicy for you no it's great  

  • now it's coming see it hits  you at the back of your throat

  • hmm that's fantastic the devil has  all the best dishes yes he does

  • i want to find out about the  period of malacca's history  

  • when it became known to europeans as  an exotic center of wealth and trade

  • from about 1400 the freeport  of malacca rivaled venice in  

  • the west teeming with vessels attracting  crowds of merchants from across the globe  

  • some of whom not only worked for  profit but lived by the prophet

  • professor mohammed nasri nasir of  the national university of malaysia  

  • is an expert on how islam rather than catholicism  became the defining religion of the malays nasa  

  • i'm michael hi michael nice to meet you great to  see you and what a beautiful city the first king  

  • of malacca became a muslim in the 15th century  changed his name to muhammad shah and his title  

  • to sultan why would the ruler here want to embrace  islam well you know the according to history uh  

  • the the history that we have rulers were mainly  convinced with arguments of the islam brought  

  • etc but i think there's another reason for it yes  the the reason for it i think has a lot to do with  

  • the number of merchants that were  coming mainly from the muslim lands  

  • thus it would make a lot of sense for him  to embrace islam will enable him to enrich  

  • his country and reach his dynasty yes i'm from  malacca islam spreads through the peninsula yes  

  • the third king basically had the idea of expanding  malacca's borders so he went about uh taking  

  • lands uh or having uh treaties assigned with the  different uh states which were later to become his  

  • vessel states these are also places where a lot  of the spices came from so it would make a lot of  

  • sense for him to have treatises with these places  so while doing that he spread islam these places  

  • became islam and became muslim the islam that was  adopted here in malacca was it exactly the same  

  • as that which might have come from india or the  middle east well yes and no in a sense i think  

  • the islam in malacca was implemented more  uh you know flexible yeah in a more flexible  

  • way in order to accommodate the different uh  types of communities that were there in malacca  

  • that in those days during the time of malacca  in the 16th century there were at least 85  

  • languages that were spoken here that shows  a lot of multiculturalism multi-religiousism

  • under the malaysian constitution islam is the  official religion of the nation but all other  

  • faiths may be practiced alongside it the  government promotes the welfare of muslims  

  • and supports islamic institutions such as  this beautiful malacca straits mosque paid  

  • for by the state and completed in 2006. and yet  only about 60 percent of malaysians are muslims

  • how does the other 40 the including the  chinese and the indian ethnicities how do  

  • they feel about this so you get uh various  opinions being set against the government  

  • so the non-muslims are criticizing government  saying that not a lot of attention are giving to  

  • given to our our social well-being and the  muslims are also saying that government is  

  • not being islamic enough you know even giving all  these things you know having a beautiful mosque  

  • such as this is still not enough government  is really in a very difficult situation  

  • in a sense to please everybody and as you  know michael you can't please everyone  

  • i'm back on track headed southeast to johor  baru this line is being converted from single  

  • to dual track and electrified once finished  in 2022 it should almost halve the journey  

  • time along the southern malaysian  peninsula between kuala lumpur and  

  • to johor baru a half hours i'm breaking my journey  at kluang home to some of the largest fruit farms  

  • in malaysia according to the old guy book there  are about a hundred sorts of fruit grown in malaya  

  • the pineapple originated in south america  christopher columbus encountered it in guadalupe  

  • it probably reached here with the portuguese  in the 16th century with tin pouring out of the  

  • layer and with the development of canning the  whole world could enjoy a slice of the action

  • it was the arrival of the railway and this station  in particular around the time of my bradshaws that  

  • linked local agriculture to global markets and  it's also home to a slightly more recent icon

  • is quite a small place but if there's one  thing it's known for its clang rail coffee  

  • which has hardly changed since it opened in 1938  here alongside the platform at the station it  

  • specializes in coffee and bread which actually are  not staples of the malaysian diet their leftovers  

  • from the colonial era it's always crowded and  people are going through the food today like a  

  • hot knife through butter the bread is grilled  over charcoal and it is the toast of the town

  • i've come south from kluang to meet mr ho  bao is a third generation pineapple farmer

  • mr ho yep pineapples this this is like a sea of  pineapples there are pineapples as far as i can  

  • see in every direction yep what did this used to  be before pineapples uh or jungle yeah jungle and  

  • these trees how many pineapples do you get from  each tree okay one tree one paste and how many  

  • per year okay one one one tree one piecechocolate place three year two beast my goodness  

  • only two pineapples every three years yep and  then when the tree has given you the pineapple  

  • do you have to change it or does this tree  last forever cut pen ten a new one three  

  • wow yep and these these look as though  they're ready to cut how do you cut them  

  • i kind of use the knife with a knife wellsuppose that was a bit of a silly question  

  • okay mr hoff

  • thank you

  • thank you

  • whoa well done

  • but actually harvesting pineapples is a weighty  business oh this is getting quite heavy how heavy  

  • do these get uh some people 50 kg 60 70 see  the people very stronger strong strong yeah

  • here it is

  • let me see your knife that's a beautiful  knife what's that made of rain lower behind  

  • spring very good land rover spring yep  it works pretty well doesn't it it's here

  • you want it yeah let's havelook at one that'd be lovely

  • don't try this at home

  • that's amazing that is so full of juice oh  

  • of course i've never eaten a pineapple  that fresh before just cheers

  • mr ho yep do we need to be  worried about snakes yep

  • my journey will take me to johor baru which  bradshaw's remarks is 15 miles north of singapore  

  • with many attractions for european visitors  johor an independent state but since 1885  

  • controlled in its foreign relations by great  britain i will investigate the highly unusual  

  • relationship between the british crown and this  sultanate at the tip of the malay peninsula

  • close to johor beru's central station lies  the grand palace of the sultan of johor

  • my guide to the palace and its creator sultan  abu bakr is gemelion this is the day one  

  • the decor shows the mutual regard between  the sultan and his chinese subjects

  • jimmy what a wonderful hall isn't it  

  • if you look around here you see quite a lot of  chinese character this is a gift from the chinese  

  • community to the sultan and those chinese  characters are words of wisdom sent in the  

  • hall you can see the royal in sigma and that's  personally designed by the late sultan abubakar  

  • it's very very beautiful if you look around here  i want you to look at that marble bus over there  

  • that's the late sultan abu bakr the  father of modern jehovah yes yeah  

  • abu bakr was not born to be sultan he inheritedlesser title giving him command of the police and  

  • army but he used his education diplomatic skills  and interest in western ways to increase his power  

  • he visited britain six times gaining the  friendship of queen victoria and it was she  

  • who promoted him to sultan in 1885 pushing aside  the incumbent dynasty every time when the sultan  

  • visited queen victoria back in england they  exchanged gifts yeah one of the gifts that the  

  • sultan presented was the albert memorial in silver  and we have also a special bust of queen victoria  

  • which has been displayed in one of the showcase  here and most memorable is a letter that was  

  • signed off as your affectionate friend queen  victoria so an unusually close relationship  

  • between a monarch and a monarch in one of her  colonies southern abu bakr also developed johar's  

  • agriculture and economy using knowledge gained  from trips to britain and other western countries

  • he used his connections to  maintain johar's independence

  • this sultan who liked to impress and had been to  britain i'm surprised he didn't build a railway no  

  • uh that wasn't true in fact the first railway line  to be constructed established in this country was  

  • built by the late sultan abu bakr and that was in  1869 recorded of course in the country the first  

  • railway was 1885 but to be very frank there was an  experimental initiative to build that railway line  

  • to a destination called gunompulai and gunung  pulai is about 600 over meters above sea level  

  • which is about 50 kilometers away from the town  and the british wanted that place to be converted  

  • into a sanatorium where the british can take their  weak ends and recuperate on that island but that  

  • railway went failure because there was quite a lot  of termites and and the the rail uh that that time  

  • of course they were made of timber and the the  termites attacked the timber track and as a result  

  • uh when the train was put on to run 16 kilometers  away from here it just collapsed in hole and  

  • that was the full stop off that railway oh my  goodness beaten by termites yeah that's right

  • abu bakr had achieved great things before he  died in london in 1895 but by the time of my  

  • bradshaw's guidebook his successor could  no longer resist british pressure johar  

  • like the rest of malaya fell under  the authority of the british crown

  • although christian missionaries arrived  in malacca nearly five centuries ago  

  • islam spread through the  malay population undaunted  

  • with the help of sir frank swetnam by the time  of my guidebook the british had established  

  • political control over the malay peninsula when  it was lost to japan during the second world war  

  • british prestige was shattered and the union  flag was lowered over malaya for the last time  

  • in 1957. i've been surprised that colonial  relics are not despised here malaysia  

  • accepts a british legacy as a foundation for  institutions which are distinctive and homegrown

  • next time in singapore i'll soak up the street  art of chinatown i took 10 weekends to paint this  

  • mural while working as an accountant you were  not a professional artist then yeah i wasn't  

  • now i am i'll visit the birthplace  of a world-famous cocktail  

  • hello guess what i'm going to order  a singapore swing a single falsely

  • and help to keep the nation's orchids in bloom

  • isn't that beautiful it's fun

  • the corner shop at the heart of british  neighborhoods for more than a century  

  • join yard and family back in time for the  corner shop starts tuesday 8pm on bbc2

  • you

i'm in southeast asia with my 1913 bradshaw's  handbook published at the height of european  

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B1 中級 英國腔

波迪路亚洲铁路 18(波迪路亚洲铁路 18)

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    Yiu Fung Chow 發佈於 2021 年 11 月 09 日
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