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  • (lively music)

  • - [Babish] Hey, what's up, guys?

  • Welcome back to "Binging with Babish," where this week,

  • we're making that big ol' feast

  • that Carl Casper prepares for himself

  • to prove that he can still cook.

  • And look, here's his actual carving fork

  • that Jon Favreau was kind enough to give to me,

  • and here's my carving fork, because today,

  • a whole bunch of brand new Babish cookware items

  • are now available on Amazon,

  • including this carving fork, a cast iron trivet,

  • a stainless steel saute pan, and carbon steel wok,

  • with lots more to come in the next few months,

  • including this 12-piece essential cookware set.

  • Anyway, let's put these tools to good use

  • as we make a whole lot of food,

  • starting with a marinade for some pork belly.

  • I've got the juice of one orange and two limes here

  • that I'm gonna combine with two tablespoons of mirin

  • and two tablespoons of soy sauce,

  • two tablespoons kosher salt,

  • one tablespoon of whole black peppercorns,

  • one tablespoon of Mexican oregano,

  • three bay leaves, also in a tiny cup for some reason,

  • two Mexican cinnamon sticks, likewise, tiny cup,

  • and five cloves of garlic, lightly crushed.

  • This is gonna help us fish it out of the marinade later on.

  • Now we're also gonna incorporate

  • one whole dried ancho chili, stem and seeds removed,

  • which we're gonna dry-roast in a pan for five minutes

  • before dousing with water

  • and letting soak for 10 more minutes,

  • adding a couple ice cubes

  • if the peppers are still steaming hot off the stove.

  • Once you have achieved a nice, smooth pepper puree

  • and it's not too warm, we're gonna add it to our marinade,

  • which we're now gonna put to good use with some pork belly,

  • the likes of which Chef Casper could be seen plating up

  • with a whole bunch of pretty sauces.

  • Sometimes a big ol' hunk belly

  • like this one comes with the ribs still intact,

  • so we're gonna have to take those off.

  • Hang onto these if you wanna add porky flavor to something.

  • And we're also gonna remove the skin,

  • which you can also hang onto if you wanna make cracklin.

  • Then I'm subdividing the belly

  • into two more manageable pieces,

  • placing them in a Zip Top bag,

  • and pouring our marinade over the top,

  • massaging gently but thoroughly to evenly distribute

  • and then fridging for 24 hours,

  • during which time we're gonna tend

  • to those pretty sauces I was talking about.

  • First up, a roasted garlic carrot puree.

  • We're taking a whole head of garlic, decapitating it,

  • drizzling with olive oil and wrapping in aluminum foil,

  • and roasting for about 45 minutes

  • at 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Then we're grabbing a pound of carrots,

  • peeling, chopping into more manageable pieces,

  • a little overdramatically, if you ask me.

  • Then we are whacking them into a high-walled saucepan,

  • covering with water, about two cups' worth,

  • bringing to a simmer, and letting it cook for 15, 20 minutes

  • until completely tender and easily pierceable

  • with your piercing implement of choice.

  • Now it's time to blend,

  • so we're gonna dump these carrots

  • and most of their cooking liquid,

  • our cloves of roasted garlic,

  • 1/2 teaspoon of freshly toasted and ground cumin,

  • one tablespoon of brown sugar,

  • and the juice of half a lemon

  • in our favorite high-powered blender,

  • blending on maximum velocity for two to three minutes

  • or until completely smooth.

  • I'm also emulsifying a little olive oil in there

  • while the blender runs, which turned out to be a mistake.

  • It lightened up the color too much, I think,

  • but I added some more steamed carrots,

  • and I think we evened it out.

  • Go ahead and chill this until it's time to serve.

  • Next up, Roy Choi described the green sauce

  • as a salsa verde, so I've got a pound of tomatillos here

  • that I've peeled, cut in half, and drizzled with oil,

  • along with two serrano peppers and half a small onion.

  • This guy's headed under the broiler

  • for two to five minutes until nicely charred.

  • Then, as was with the carrots, so go with the tomatillos.

  • We're gonna place these in the blender,

  • along with some other salsa verde essentials:

  • four cloves of garlic,

  • a generous bunch of cilantro, if that's your thing.

  • I'm not gonna judge you.

  • Totally understand if you wanna judge me, though.

  • The juice of one lime, by hand or by machine,

  • if you just check the dishwasher.

  • A generous pinch of salt, and that's about it.

  • Cover it up and blend it down.

  • Normally, we'd wanna go for a pretty chunky consistency,

  • but the sauce seen in the movie is perfectly smooth,

  • so once that consistency is achieved,

  • we're gonna pour it out, let it cool,

  • cover it up, and fridge it until ready to use.

  • Another thing we can make ahead of time

  • is this chili garlic sauce that the pork is finished with.

  • I've got 1/3 cup of gochujang, 1/4 cup of soy sauce,

  • 1/4 cup of honey, three tablespoons of brown sugar,

  • four crushed cloves of garlic,

  • and one tablespoon of freshly grated ginger.

  • Give this a tiny whisking until homogenous

  • and set it aside until ready to use,

  • or eat it all with a spoon

  • because it's really, really delicious.

  • Last up in our day-before mise en place

  • are some quick pickled radishes, one of my favorite snacks.

  • We're slicing half a dozen radishes nice and thin,

  • adding a tablespoon of mustard seeds

  • and an optional 1/4 teaspoon of red chili flakes.

  • And then we're preparing our quick pickling liquid:

  • 1/2 cup each water and white vinegar and 1/4 cup of sugar.

  • Bring to a simmer, tiny whisk until dissolved,

  • and pour over the radishes,

  • covering and letting cool completely.

  • Then, finally, we gotta get our pork started.

  • I know that Chef Casper just ran home

  • and made this in one night, but being a chef,

  • I figure he's got some of this stuff kicking around.

  • I'm removing the pork from the marinade,

  • rinsing, and patting dry,

  • and then placing in vacuum-sealed bags for sous viding.

  • 165 degrees Fahrenheit for 10 hours should do the trick,

  • after which these guys can be immediately removed

  • from the sous vide and plunged into an ice bath

  • and then held in the fridge

  • until we're ready to throw in the oven and serve.

  • So now we're getting into our day of dinner stuff,

  • and the first thing I wanna knock out

  • is the caramel dust that he pours over the fruit.

  • I got one cup of granulated sugar that I'm gonna combine

  • with one tablespoon of light corn syrup

  • in a large, wide, heavy-bottomed stainless steel saucepan,

  • placing over medium, medium-low heat

  • and stirring infrequently

  • until it forms a deep golden-amber caramel.

  • Then we're gonna pour that out

  • onto a super nonstick, super heatproof surface,

  • like a Silpat set in a rimmed baking sheet.

  • Try to get it spread out

  • as evenly and as thinly as possible,

  • maybe inadvisably using a rubber spatula

  • to perpetuate that idea and failing,

  • then letting it cool completely

  • at room temperature until ready to smash,

  • making sure to keep it away from moisture.

  • In the meantime, we can get our berries macerating.

  • I got a pint each blueberries,

  • blackberries, and raspberries.

  • I'm sprinkling those with 1/4 cup of sugar

  • and some finely-chopped fresh mint, which I'm going to bunch

  • into an adorable little bundle for easier slicing.

  • Sprinkle this over top and give this guy a good mix

  • and allow to macerate in the fridge for a few hours.

  • It's gonna draw out all the juices.

  • Next up, to my dismay, Chef Carl Casper uses

  • his big, beefy, Rocky Marciano-like forearms

  • to beat whipped cream by hand,

  • so for the sake of accuracy and solidarity,

  • I will begrudgingly do the same,

  • but I'm not gonna not be a wimp about it.

  • I promise that five minutes

  • spent painfully hand-whipping whipped cream

  • are more valuable than a $10 hand mixer.

  • That being said, go ahead and whip this to firm peaks

  • and keep it fridged until you're ready to use it.

  • Next up, the steak was accompanied

  • by some butter roasted fingerling potatoes,

  • so I'm chopping up a pound's worth into bite-size pieces

  • and placing them in some cold, heavily salted water

  • spiked with a tablespoon of white vinegar,

  • bringing to a simmer, and cooking

  • for about 12 minutes until completely tender,

  • then spreading out on a rimmed baking sheet

  • to cool until we're ready to roast.

  • Next up, there's a whole bunch of food accessories

  • surrounding the dry-aged ribeye,

  • so we're gonna knock those out.

  • First up, some ribbons of zucchini

  • that are grilled and seasoned with lemon verbena.

  • So for consistency's sake

  • and because I don't trust my knife skills,

  • I'm slicing these into ribbons via mandolin,

  • drizzling with oil, seasoning with kosher salt

  • and freshly ground black pepper,

  • and then taking 'em out to the grill,

  • where I'm gonna grill them over high heat

  • for about one minute per side,

  • along with some corn, likewise drizzled with oil

  • and grilled for about five minutes, all told.

  • I know I don't have any footage from the grill,

  • but it was raining and nighttime

  • and you're just gonna have to trust me.

  • We're gonna chop this stuff off the cob

  • to make a super simple lime corn salad.

  • A little squirt of olive oil,

  • a little sprinkle of kosher salt,

  • and a little squeeze of lime, and that's all there is to it.

  • Is it because it's just a side dish

  • and I don't wanna overcomplicate it?

  • Hell yes it is.

  • Can simple things still be really, really tasty?

  • Hell yes they can be.

  • Speaking of which,

  • we have our lovely ribbons of grilled zucchini,

  • which I'm gonna top with lemon verbena,

  • which, against all odds,

  • I actually have growing in my backyard,

  • which I had forgotten about until after Kendall

  • and I had searched four grocery stores for it.

  • We're finally chopping this up, sprinkling it over top.

  • Then, that's all there is to it.

  • Moving onto another little bit of mise en place:

  • a stir fry sauce for our octopus.

  • In an bowl, we're combining 1 1/2 tablespoons of soy sauce,

  • one teaspoon of sesame oil, one tablespoon sugar,

  • one tablespoon gochugaru, two tablespoons gochujang,

  • three cloves of crushed garlic,

  • and an inch or two of grated fresh ginger.

  • Go ahead and tiny whisk this together until it's homogenous

  • and set aside until blah, blah, blah.

  • Next up, we have some Meyer lemon creme fraiche.

  • I couldn't find a Meyer lemon,

  • so I'm just zesting a regular lemon into some creme fraiche.

  • If this ruins the entire meal, you'll be the first to know.

  • And now, with all of our accoutrements out of the way,

  • we can get down to the business of steak:

  • a big ol' dry-aged bone-in ribeye

  • that we're gonna generously salt and pepper on all facades

  • and let sit at room temperature for at least half an hour.

  • Just kidding, I guess we're still working on side dishes.

  • Since the potatoes are described as butter roasted,

  • I'm tossing them together with kosher salt,

  • freshly ground black pepper, and clarified butter,

  • which won't burn like regular butter

  • in the punishing heat of a 450 degree Fahrenheit oven.

  • When we mix these together to coat,

  • we really wanna beat them up

  • so they get coated in a thick, gooey layer of starch,

  • which is gonna help them get extra crispy in the oven.

  • Lastly, I'm pouring them onto a preheated baking sheet,

  • making sure that they're as flat as possible,

  • which is gonna help maximize browning and prevent stickage.