Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hi, there! This is Mirari.

  • Are you someone who claims to have a bad memory?

  • If you want to learn a new language but struggle with the tons of new vocabulary to memorize, this video is for you!

  • Today, we'll find out how our memory works

  • and how to tap into your mind's full potential to learn a language effectively.

  • Let's start with some good newsanyone can improve their memory to see tangible results.   

  • Perhaps you've seen demonstrations of people who can memorize impressive amounts of information,

  • or you admire polyglots who can speak over 10 languages fluently.

  • Maybe you feel like these goals are out of your  reach just because your memory isn't very good?

  • The first thing you should know is  that it's not the method you follow

  • or the medium you use that makes it possible for you to successfully learn a language.

  • The most important components are you and your brain.

  • Knowing how to learn is what makes the difference between polyglots and everyday people.

  • If you try even half of the techniques I'm going to show you,

  • you'll drastically improve your ability to  memorize vocabulary in your target language.

  • But before we discover these surprising and highly effective techniques,

  • it's important to understand why they work.

  • After all, you'll get the most benefits  when you understand the strategy behind the method.

  • To do this, we're going to go over how the brain works, and therefore, how memory works.

  • How does our memory work?

  • The first term you should learn is "Neural Network."

  • Picture this: your brain consists of a huge network of neurons.

  • We're talking about tens of billions of cells!

  • Neurons have the ability to send and receive electrical and chemical signals between one another.

  • Each neuron is capable of connecting to tens of thousands of other neurons.

  • Just imagine how many combinations are possible!

  • It's difficult to show these numbers, but this whole system is present in your head.

  • So don't go thinking that you don't have enough room  in your brain to learn a language,

  • or that you're too old to learn.

  • One important notion to keep in mind is that neurons never stop connecting and disconnecting from each other.

  • These connections vary in strength and number.

  • When you learn a word, a number of strong connections form in your brain for this word,

  • and you can access the word quickly just because its pathways are relatively strong.

  • However, it's important to know that connections between neurons weaken if you don't use them regularly.

  • That's why people say: "if you don't use it, you'll lose it."

  • And that's why at MosaLingua we use a method called Spaced Repetition System.

  • We'll talk about it very soon, but you can  find the link to our article in the description.

  • The Forgetting Curve

  • Have a look at a graphic representation  of what we call "The Forgetting Curve."

  • Can you see the blue line? It shows just how rapidly  information is forgotten after we first learn it

  • In as little as 8 hours, much of what we've learned is already slipping away.

  • On Day 1, most people will only be able to recall about 60% of what was learned.

  • By Day 8, retention is down to just 20%.

  • So the question now is:

  • how can you learn the vocabulary of a new language  without spending a ton of time on it?

  • How To Improve Your Memory

  • Have a look at the graphic again. Next to the blue line, there is a red one.

  • It represents how much we memorize after the first repetition.

  • The purple line shows how much we memorize after the second repetition

  • and the green one is related tothird repetition.

  • As you can see, the forgetting curve gets smaller when we include repetitions in our learning process.

  • This shows the important role that time plays in learning and forgetting.

  • So tip number 1 is scheduling your language sessions.

  • Without intervention or an appropriate learning strategy, most learners forget 90% of what they've learned within the first month.

  • In fact, it's not unusual to have forgotten up to 30% of what you've learned

  • just after a few hours of studying the language.

  • But don't despair!

  • With the right approach, you can ensure that the information you learn is added to your long-term memory.

  • Of course, not everything you learn or experience is treated the same way.

  • Some memories are stronger than others and seem to stick in your brain.

  • There are a few different reasons why this might happen.

  • One of the most common, however, is because the memory  is associated with a particularly strong emotion.

  • So tip number 2 is associating what you're learning with an emotion.

  • But that doesn't mean that you need to be in a heightened emotional state

  • to learn something effectively.

  • There are plenty of tricks for learning and memorizing information.

  • Let me give you an example:

  • to remember the word dog in Spanish, "perro," you could try to picture your childhood dog

  • any time you think of the word "perro."

  • If you haven't watched Lisa's video about how to create mental images that really work,

  • be sure to check that one out next. I'll put the link in the description for you.

  • Finally, your body chemistry can have a big  effect on how strong your memory is.

  • That's why certain lifestyles or food choices can help make  the difference between a strong or weak memory from the beginning.

  • So tip number 3 is having a healthy lifestyle:

  • maintaining low stress levels, getting a good amount of sleep,

  • and meditating are just a few ways to build stronger memories.

  • We've already mentioned the importance of building a strong memory,

  • but there's something else you can do to make sure you make rapid progress in your target language

  • and retain 100% of what you learn.

  • Tip number 4: repetition!

  • Repetition really is the ultimate key to success.

  • The more frequently you repeat a word or phrase that you've learned, the better you'll be able to remember it later on.

  • Research has shown that when you review vocabulary at regular intervals, it increases your retention.

  • Eventually, it toppers off to a flat line and the memory is secured in your brain.

  • So let's recap what you can do to improve your memory:

  • Schedule your language learning sessions

  • Associate what you're learning with an emotion

  • Have a healthy lifestyle

  • Use repetition to make things stick

  • So that's all for today! I hope these tips will be  helpful for you as you work on your memory skills.

  • Talk to you again soon!

  • If you learned something new from this video, give it a thumbs up.

  • Then, hit subscribe and turn on your notifications.

  • Have a look around our channel for more hacks and tips.

  • And if you're watching on another social media platform, like or follow our page.

  • See you next time!

Hi, there! This is Mirari.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級 美國腔

How Our Memory Works

  • 16 0
    nao 發佈於 2021 年 09 月 29 日
影片單字