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  • I'm travelling to Osea Island just off the Essex coast to visit Native, a restaurant

  • that recently moved here from London with the aim of becoming entirely self-sufficient.

  • The hospitality industry can be incredibly wasteful. But like Native, a growing number

  • of restaurants are moving toward a zero-waste policy of sustainability.

  • Imogen Davis is the restaurant's co-founder.

  • Why did you pick Osea Island?

  • The big eventual dream was that we always had a restaurant system that was really closed

  • loop and self-sufficient as possible.

  • And you used the term closed loop. Can you tell me a little bit what that means?

  • It means that we have to grow as much as possible. Keep the miles that any food has travelled

  • to a minimum. Be as zero waste as we absolutely possibly can. It's very much a case of trying

  • to live off of the land, but in harmony with the land.

  • Imogen's taking me to go foraging for the ingredients needed for today's menu.

  • Any seaweed that you do gather, like this sea lettuce, which is going to be on the menu….

  • Guests here are treated to a seasonal dining experience.

  • It's just the most beautiful colour.

  • The menu is dictated by what has been freshly gathered from the Island's wild larder.

  • Do you think that kind of chains and bigger restaurants in London and elsewhere in the

  • world can just follow this model?

  • It's about responding to the environment around you. Chains can do that. Absolutely. They

  • just need to, I guess, not be just driven by that one purpose of money.

  • Native currently imports some of its ingredients from sustainable suppliers but aims to be

  • entirely self-sufficient within five years.

  • Why do you think that what you're doing here and the kind of philosophy behind Native is

  • kind of important for the hospitality industry?

  • We have to stop putting stress on the food chain, dictating to the land. What we want,

  • we have to let the land to dictate to us pretty much. You know, you have one cow, you have

  • to learn how to use every single part and I think that's really important to the agriculture

  • industry, as well as to the hospitality industry.

  • Having helped gather some of its contents, I'd love to stay for the meal the chefs

  • are preparing.

  • But I've got a boat to catch, and another restaurant to visit.

  • According to the UK government, the hospitality industry here throws away about £1.5bn worth

  • of food each year.

  • I've come to East London, where you'll find zero-waste restaurant Silo.

  • The idea for Silo started with a simple concept: could a restaurant operate without a single

  • bin?

  • Head chef and founder Douglas McMaster says that any zero-waste restaurant needs to use

  • a three-pillar approach: direct trade with suppliers, whole food preparation and composting.

  • Direct trade's the most important, because when you deal directly with where food and

  • materials come from, there is no packaging. Everything that comes into this space into

  • this restaurant is reusable as a material or natural, including food. The things that

  • we don't eat then is composted and then it goes back into the system.

  • While some of these processes may be a little unconventional, Douglas says Silo's food

  • costs are very low.

  • So do you think, that actually, most restaurants are just missing a trick here?

  • Absolutely. You know, we do spend more on people, but less on food, less on ingredients.

  • At Silo, even the furniture and fittings are created from natural products, or materials

  • that would normally have gone to waste.

  • These tables, for example, are made from recycled plastic and sustainably sourced wood.

  • Plates are made from recycled plastic bags.

  • So, it looks a bit like mother of pearl, like galvanized steel, but this is from the medical

  • food packaging industry.

  • And when you say waste, where would that normally be going?

  • Most would have gone to landfill or in some cases recycling.

  • Douglas was inspired by food-upcycling methods popularly used in Asian countries, like Japan,

  • and thanks to a dish of cuttlefish in fermented sauce, I'm about to find out that zero waste

  • doesn't mean compromised taste.

  • It's all about this sauce here.

  • That is delicious.

  • So the fermentation not only prevents waste, fermenting all of the things that would become

  • waste, we ferment into these liquids and then they kind of close this loop, but then deliver

  • like the most exquisite flavour that is so unique and like nowhere else.

  • The scale with which food is being wasted across the industry is unsustainable, but

  • reducing waste also makes business sense.

  • According to a recent World Resources Institute study across 12 countries, for every dollar

  • invested in food waste reduction, restaurants can realize approximately $8 of cost savings,

  • and maybe that'll be the strongest incentive to make other restaurants consider a zero-waste

  • approach. END

  • Subs SOCIAL ZERO WASTE The hospitality industry can be incredibly

  • wasteful. But a growing number of restaurants are moving toward a closed loop and zero waste

  • policy of sustainability.

  • So, do you think most restaurants are just missing a trick here?

  • Absolutely. You know, we do spend more on people, but less on food, less on ingredients.

I'm travelling to Osea Island just off the Essex coast to visit Native, a restaurant

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餐厅向零浪费迈进(The restaurants moving towards zero waste | FT Food Revolution)

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    joey joey 發佈於 2021 年 07 月 31 日
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