Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hi guys, welcome back to English with Max. In this video we're going to look at five

  • very common English expressions. These expressions are universal. They're not

  • typically American or typically British. They are used in all English-speaking

  • countries. These aren't slang expressions, but we

  • use them in spoken language and informal writing, so don't write them in

  • your academic essays. If you'd like to watch this video with subtitles, remember

  • to turn on the captions. Don't forget that you can also follow me on social

  • media and remember to subscribe and to click the little bell if you want to be

  • updated on new videos. If you haven't yet signed up for my course on common

  • mistakes, you can click the link in the description. That link will take you to

  • the main page where you can watch some previews. And by clicking on that link

  • you'll also be able to get the course at a discounted price.

  • Okay, the first expression is: fair enough. Fair enough.

  • We say this when we think something is reasonable or to show that we understand

  • something, whether or not we actually agree with it. Normally we say it in

  • response to something someone has said. For example: I'll cook dinner and you can

  • wash up. Fair enough. In this case person B is agreeing, so

  • they're basically saying: Sure, that's fine.

  • Another example... Person A says: I'm going to stop dating that girl because she

  • never returns my phone calls. Person B says: Fair enough.

  • In that case, person B isn't really agreeing or disagreeing. They are just saying:

  • That's reasonable. I understand. Here's another example.

  • Person A: I think we should fire Frank. Person B: If you don't like him,

  • fair enough, but you can't say that he's bad at his job.

  • In that case, person B is basically saying: I understand why you think that,

  • but I don't think we should fire him. In other words, I understand, but I disagree.

  • And finally... I won't be able to finish the report by Friday because I've had a cold.

  • Fair enough, but you had the same excuse last week. In that case, person B

  • is saying: Well, I kind of understand you, but it sounds like you're just making excuses.

  • The next expression is: it's up to you. It's up to you. In French this is

  • similar to: comme tu veux. And in Spanish it's a bit like: como quieras.

  • This simply means, it's your decision, or you decide. For example:

  • Do you want to eat in or eat out this evening? It's up to you. In other words,

  • I don't care. You decide. Which movie do you want to see later? It's up to you.

  • When we're speaking, we often leave off the "it's". So we just say: up to you. Up to you.

  • You can also replace "you" with other nouns or pronouns. For example: It's not

  • my decision. It's up to them. Will you get a promotion? I don't know. It's up to my boss.

  • In those last examples, we wouldn't leave off "it's". We only leave off "it's" if

  • "you" is in the sentence. So you can say: "It's up to you" or "up to you". The next

  • phrase is: I don't mind. "I don't mind" is a slightly more polite way of saying

  • "I don't care". "I don't care" isn't necessarily rude. If you use a pleasant

  • tone of voice when you say it, normally it's fine. For example: What do you want

  • for lunch? Oh, I don't care. But you need to be careful with it, because sometimes

  • it's used to express annoyance or indifference. For example, someone might say:

  • Fine! I don't care. Anyway, "I don't mind" is very polite. You might have

  • noticed that I didn't really pronounce the T. I didn't say: I don'T mind. When we

  • speak, we normally swallow it, so we say: I don't mind. I don't mind. You can often

  • use it instead of "up to you". For example: Do you want to eat in or eat out this evening?

  • I don't mind. Which movie do you want to see? I don't mind. But there are some

  • instances where those expressions aren't interchangeable. For example: Can I share

  • a table with you? Sure, I don't mind. In that case, we wouldn't say:

  • Sure, it's up to you. Another example: Do you mind giving me a

  • lift home later? No, I don't mind. Again, in that case we wouldn't say: No, it's up to you.

  • Now guys, if you're a French or a Spanish speaker, be careful. Instead of

  • saying "I don't mind" or "it's up to you", a lot of French and Spanish speakers will say:

  • As you want. Or: As you like. While that's not grammatically incorrect,

  • native speakers wouldn't say it. You will sometimes hear native speakers say:

  • As you wish. I think that phrase was made popular by The Princess Bride - a great movie -

  • but we don't really use it instead of "I don't mind" or "it's up to you".

  • We normally use it in response to a command or request, but it's quite formal and

  • old-fashioned so I don't recommend that you use it.

  • This expression is: it rings a bell. It rings a bell. In French, it's like:

  • ça me dit quelque chose. And in Spanish the translation would be: me suena.

  • We say this when something sounds familiar to us, but we don't know

  • or can't remember much information.

  • Have you heard of the movie The Princess Bride?

  • It rings a bell, but I don't know what it's about.

  • You can also say "THAT rings a bell".

  • That rings a bell, but I don't know what it's about.

  • We also often say: the name or his or her name rings a bell.

  • For example: Have you heard of this movie?

  • The name rings a bell.

  • Do you know George Foster?

  • I've never met him, but his name rings a bell.

  • You can also use it in a question. For example: Does that name ring a bell?

  • The final expression is: Here you go. Here you go. When we speak, the "you"

  • becomes a "ye". Here ye go. Here ye go. This is a very simple expression, but I

  • decided to include it, because when you think about it, it's a bit strange.

  • Here you go? You go where? It actually has nothing to do with going anywhere.

  • It's just a common thing that we say when we give something to someone, particularly

  • something that they're expecting. Let's see some examples.

  • Can you pass me the salt, please? Here you go.

  • I just collected the mail and there are some letters for you. Here you go.

  • We also sometimes use it in emails. For example, if someone asks

  • you to send them a document, you could send them an email with the document

  • attached and just write: Here you go. But remember that it's colloquial, so we

  • would only do that with someone who we knew relatively well. A very similar

  • expression is: Here you are. It means the same thing. So you can use "here you are"

  • and "here you go" interchangeably.

  • if you'd like to practise using any of these expressions, write a few sentences

  • in the comments and I'll try to correct them for you. See you next time.

  • Um I think that...

  • ... Bride...

  • Remember that you need to... ... be...

  • For example...

  • Kookaburras outside.

Hi guys, welcome back to English with Max. In this video we're going to look at five

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級 美國腔

个非常常见的英语短语和表达(5 Very Common English Phrases and Expressions)

  • 26 4
    joey joey 發佈於 2021 年 07 月 30 日
影片單字