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  • At MosaLingua we strongly support independent language learning.

  • But when you choose to learn a language by yourself

  • instead of in a traditional classroom setting

  • figuring out your level of language proficiency is not always so evident.

  • If you're having a hard time determining your level

  • tag along and I'll show you how to use the CEFR standards

  • to find out where you stand.

  • And, equally important,

  • what you need to focus on to reach your target level.

  • Before I go on, please subscribe to our channel and click the bell icon

  • if you want a notification when we post new videos about language learning.

  • One more thing before we get into the main event:

  • I'll be talking about English as an example today,

  • but all this information is relevant for other languages, too.

  • CEFR, the system I'll be talking about,

  • was specifically designed to be applied to many different languages.

  • So why is it important to know your level?

  • Well first, it can help guide your practice.

  • Like I just said, once you know where you stand, it's easier to improve

  • because you're aware of your strengths and your weaknesses.

  • In just a few minutes, I'll tell you what activities and skills

  • you need to be focusing on at each level.

  • Next, if your ultimate goal is to study or find a job abroad

  • you will probably have to prove

  • that your language skills are good enough to do so.

  • The school or company might want to see a certain level

  • listed on your application or your resumé

  • or they might even require you to take a language proficiency test.

  • It can also be very encouraging for some people

  • to have a concrete goal to work toward

  • even if it isn't required by a school or employer.

  • And it's exciting once you finally have proof

  • in the form of a language certificate for example

  • that you have reached that goal.

  • For more on this, watch Luca's video

  • where he gives his professional polyglot opinion

  • about whether language certifications and exams are useful or not.

  • The link is in the video description.

  • The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, CEFRL,

  • is a standard that is recognized all over Europe

  • and more and more in other countries around the world, too.

  • So if you use it to describe your level on a CV

  • the employer should understand what it means.

  • The CEFR or CEFRL has six levels:

  • A1, A2,

  • B1, B2,

  • and C1 and C2,

  • from lowest to highest.

  • In a nutshell, the A levels describe basic users.

  • Once you reach the B levels

  • you're considered an independent user

  • which basically means that you're conversational.

  • And finally, people who reach the C level

  • are considered proficient.

  • If you'd like more info about the CEFR levels

  • I've put links to our video and our article about them in the video description.

  • So, how do you know your level?

  • There are lots of official language tests and certificates out there.

  • If you're learning English, you may have already heard

  • of the TOEIC, the TOEFL or the IELTS, for example.

  • But they can be pretty expensive

  • and people who aren't good test takers can get inaccurate results.

  • This is where self-assessment can be helpful.

  • The Council of Europe has a really handy grid that you can use

  • to quickly evaluate your own skills in five different categories:

  • listening

  • reading

  • spoken interaction or dialogue

  • spoken production

  • and writing.

  • The nice thing about this tool is that it can help you identify

  • the discrepancies, or gaps, within your skillset.

  • For example: maybe you can read and understand opinion articles

  • which would put you at a B2 level for reading

  • but when it comes to writing

  • you can only produce short and simple personal letters

  • which would put you at about an A2 level.

  • Now you know exactly what skill you need to focus on

  • to bring your overall level up.

  • If you're learning English, the MosaLingua English teachers came up with

  • our very own interactive 20-question quiz

  • to help you determine your CEFR level as well!

  • We put links to both of those resources in the video description for you.

  • For other languages, a Google search for something like:

  • "free cefr level test"

  • or "online proficiency test"

  • should turn up quite a few results.

  • So, you have either gotten your level tested or tested it yourself.

  • What's the next step?

  • Setting a goal and planning your language learning activities accordingly.

  • If certain skills are much lower than others

  • you know what your focus should be.

  • For most people, speaking tends to be the skill that needs the most work.

  • Now, at any level, memorizing vocabulary

  • preferably with a spaced repetition system

  • should be one of your main activities.

  • If you're at an A level, focus on everyday communication.

  • We recommend working mostly on listening and speaking at this stage

  • because you want to create good habits

  • from the very beginning of your language journey.

  • A lot of people think that you need to wait until you know a ton of vocabulary

  • before you can start speaking, but that's a misconception.

  • At an A1 or an A2 level, you can already start having very basic conversations

  • with a tutor or a language partner.

  • As for listening, you'll probably want to stick to resources designed for learners

  • like MosaSeries, a step-by-step process

  • for improving your listening comprehension.

  • If you're at a B level, resources like podcasts, songs and short TV shows

  • are great resources for improving your listening skills.

  • Keep chatting with your conversation partner

  • and think about starting to add in a little bit of reading and writing practice

  • to round out your skillset.

  • Comic books are especially good for learners

  • because the amount of text isn't overwhelming

  • and the illustrations can usually give you some context to help you understand.

  • As for writing, you could keep a journal

  • or contribute to online forums related to your hobbies.

  • And finally, if you're at a C level,

  • you don't need to limit yourself to resources for learners.

  • You'll want to work with more challenging and engaging resources

  • like movies or novels, in order to learn more advanced vocabulary

  • idiomatic expressions, and slang, and sentence structures.

  • At this stage you have a lot of options and you can practice language immersion

  • using any interests you have.

  • Your progress will be a lot less noticeable than it was at the beginning of your journey.

  • But at least you can practice language without it really feeling like practice.

  • Now we want to hear from you.

  • In the comments, let us know what language you're learning,

  • what level you've reached and how you got there.

  • And, who knows... you might even inspire someone else to set a new language learning goal.

  • Take care!

  • If you learned something new from this video, give it a thumbs up.

  • Then, hit subscribe and turn on your notifications.

  • Have a look around our channel for more hacks and tips.

  • And if you're watching on another social media platform, like or follow our page.

  • See you next time.

At MosaLingua we strongly support independent language learning.

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A2 初級 美國腔

CEFR: Find out Your Level (And Improve it!)

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    nao 發佈於 2021 年 07 月 27 日
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