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  • Hong Kong is a foodies' paradise, but with so many options, it can be a bit overwhelming choosing a place to eat.

  • in this video, I'll be sharing some of my favorite things to eat every time I'm in Hong Kong.

  • First up: Yum Cha.

  • Yum cha is more than just about the food; it's a social gathering place where family and friends can hang out or catch up over tea and a wide selection of dim sums.

  • Since everything is shared, I like going to yum cha in a bigger group because then I can eat a wider variety of dishes.

  • Aome of my favorites include fung zaau, ngau tou, fu pei gyun, lo mai gai, and cherng fun.

  • Next, street food.

  • Now, Hong Kong has some of the best street food in the world.

  • A good thing is, because the food is on display, even if you don't know what something's called, you can just point to what you want.

  • I got the curry fish balls; to me, this is the number one street food that you have to eat here.

  • And also, I have stinky tofu; if you're game enough, try this.

  • You can smell it from a mile away but it tastes so good.

  • With these street food vendors, they're usually located on street corners, like, really busy areas with lots of foot traffic.

  • So, what usually happens is, you order, buy the food, and then you stand to the side and eat your food on the side of the road.

  • It's all part of the charm.

  • Speaking of street food, who can forget gai daan zai?

  • This is one of my number one things to get every time I'm back in Hong Kong.

  • Mmm! So crispy!

  • Whenever we gai daan zai, my sister always orders gaak zai beng, too.

  • So, if you haven't already tried it, why not give it a go?

  • Number four, dai pai dong.

  • Dai pai dong literally means big license stalls.

  • These are open-air food stores, and there are actually few official ones left in Hong Kong.

  • We went to a famous one in Central called Sing Heung Yuen to have their popular tomato soup-based macaroni.

  • Next, cha chaan teng.

  • Found everywhere in Hong Kong, cha chaan tengs are known for their quick and affordable meals.

  • With so much competition, getting a certain drink or dish right can really help a restaurant to stand out from the rest.

  • For example, take Lan Fong Yuen in Central

  • Lan Fong Yuen is famous for their see mud lai cha, which is... translates to stocking milk tea, and it gets its name from bag they use to make the milk tea, 'cause it looks like a stocking.

  • Another popular cha chaan teng is the Australia Dairy Company, known for their scrambled eggs.

  • Scrambled eggs is one of the standard menu items in cha chaan tengs as well as sai dor see, tung fun, and your standard tea, coffee, and yin yeung, just to name a few.

  • Congee shops.

  • Congee is a rice porridge that is a popular breakfast option.

  • My go-to congee is pei daan sau yook jook.

  • One thing I really like about pei daansuw yook jook is the... the pei daan.

  • (It) Has this really interesting texture; it's kind of like jelly, but it doesn't...

  • I don't know; it's just this... it's got this really interesting taste to it I just really like.

  • Usually, people pair congee with other items, such as stir-fried noodles and my sister's favorite, zaa leung, deep fried dough stick wrapped in rice noodle roll.

  • Noodle shops.

  • We've come to On Lee at Shau Kei Wan to have noodles for lunch.

  • At these places, you can choose your own toppings and noodles like rice noodle, egg noodles, vermicelli.

  • My personal favorite is to have yu daan hor, and specifically, the thin type of rice noodles.

  • Another specific combination I like having at noodle stores is ngau laam chou min, beef brisket with thick noodles, and it has to be thick.

  • I love these noodles; they're so good.

  • There is also a Tsim Chai Kee in Central; this store has been recommended by the Michelin Guide and is known for their delicious, generously-filled wontons.

  • And now a special one, teng zai fun.

  • Another Hong Kong experience is to get teng zai fun, which is a bowl of noodles from one of these sampans here.

  • They can be a little bit hard to find, but there just happened to be one here along Aberdeen Pier today.

  • These sampans move around a lot, so you never know where they're going to be.

  • My sister and I spent the first years of our childhood in Aberdeen, which is also home to the famous Jumbo floating restaurant.

  • And though we've been back many times since, this was our first time having teng zai fun, so it was very exciting.

  • Number eight, clay pot rice.

  • Though it is eaten all-year round, clay pot rice is especially popular during colder seasons.

  • You can choose from a wide variety of toppings, such as Chinese sausage, spare ribs, and chicken feet, all served on a steaming hot bed of rice.

  • Siu laap pou.

  • Siu laap pous are a big part of Hong Kong's food culture.

  • Often served with rice at lunch, roast meat is also a popular take-home dinner option as part of the shared dishes, or "sung", as we call it in Cantonese.

  • Next, bakeries

  • One thing I love is the smell of bakeries.

  • In Hong Kong, there are many bread stores everywhere with a wide selection of breads to choose from.

  • My personal favorites are the bor lor bao, gai mei bao, cherng zai bao, and sai beng.

  • They look good, and they taste good, too.

  • Speaking of baked goods, the iconic egg tart, daan taat.

  • There are two main types: the shortcrust pastry type, like the ones sold at Tai Cheong Bakery.

  • So Tai Cheong is popular and famous for their, um, shortcrust egg tarts, and they have branches all over Hong Kong, but this one here in Central is the main one.

  • And theres the flaky crust one, which is my favorite.

  • Fast food chains.

  • There are many fast food chains in Hong Kong, such as Daai Gaa Lok and Daai Fai Wut, which offer things from Western cuisine to Chinese and even Japanese dishes.

  • Also, international chain stores like McDonald's offer menu items that appeal to local taste buds, some of which are only available for a limited time, like the sweet potato ice cream, for example.

  • Last but not least, desserts.

  • There is no shortage of yummy desserts to choose from in Hong Kong.

  • Some of my favorites are the typical Hong Kong classics, such as hung dau bing, dau fu faa, zi maa wu, mong gwo bou din, and buut zai gou.

  • So, buut zai gou, zi ma gou.

  • This is a pudding with red bean, it's sweet, and I always get the brown one.

  • And this is a black sesame cake.

  • It's like... a thick jelly texture.

  • We're at Yee Sun milk company in Causeway Bay.

  • This place is really busy all the time.

  • It's great for desserts and they're famous for their double-skin steamed milk as well asthis is their most famousand, uh, we also get a... got a ginger-flavored steamed milk, so we're gonna try that.

  • I got a cold one of the regular steamed milk and a hot one of the ginger steamed milk.

  • It's really nice.

  • This is made from milk, sugar, and... um... egg... egg white, I believe.

  • The texture's a bit like tofu fa, but a little bit firmer.

  • So, I think this trip, we've been quite lucky, uh, in terms of not having to wait in queues for our food.

  • 'Cause the trick is, we've been going to all these places that I wa... that we want to eat at at non regular meal hours.

  • So, we've been going to different places at, like, 3 for lunch and, like, 5 o'clock dinner; so, it's not the peak hours.

  • Maybe that's the trick.

  • We just got a bowl of teng zai fun. This is where you can buy... uh... it's, um...

  • Right from the boat?

  • It doesn't look any good.

  • All right. What's next?

Hong Kong is a foodies' paradise, but with so many options, it can be a bit overwhelming choosing a place to eat.

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B1 中級 美國腔

HONG KONG FOOD GUIDE // 香港美食指南 (Hong Kong Travel Guide)

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    nao 發佈於 2021 年 07 月 05 日
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