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  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei.

  • And me, Roy.

  • We may sound a little different.

  • That's because we are not able to

  • record in our normal studios during

  • the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Roy, have you heard about Rob?

  • No, what about Rob?

  • Well, you know that Rob's been wearing

  • a long sleeve t-shirt recently.

  • It's because the other night

  • he went out with some friends.

  • Well, he lost a dare and now

  • he's got a tattoo of panda

  • on a skateboard on his arm.

  • Feifei, he's probably really embarrassed about that.

  • You shouldn't gossip.

  • I am not!

  • But, you always love it when I spill the tea!

  • You spilt some tea? While recording!?

  • That's dangerous when we're surrounded

  • by laptops and microphones.

  • No Roy, 'spilling the tea' means 'to gossip'.

  • I'm going to spill the tea some

  • more right after these examples.

  • I shouldn't spill the tea, but have you

  • heard that Bob and Susan are dating?

  • Come on, spill the tea.

  • Tell me what you know about Derek!

  • I'll spill the tea. There's going to be a

  • huge party and no one has invited Peter.

  • This is The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English and

  • we're talking about the expression

  • 'spill the tea' which means to 'to gossip'.

  • So come on Feifei, spill the tea.

  • You know everything that happens in the office.

  • How did you know about Rob's tattoo?

  • I will never reveal my sources.

  • Well, OK. It was Neil.

  • I can't believe you told me that!

  • You gave up your source so easily.

  • Well you asked, so I told you!

  • I'm just really honest.

  • Well, Feifei. I have a surprise for you!

  • You know that Neil told you

  • that Rob has a new tattoo?

  • Yes.

  • Well Feifei, Rob hasn't really got a

  • 'panda on a skateboard' tattoo.

  • We created the story to see if you'd spill the tea!

  • Rob would never do something so silly!

  • That's not fair! Bye, Roy.

  • Bye.

  • Welcome to The English We Speak.

  • It's Feifei here with Rob.

  • Hi everyone.

  • So Rob, help yourself to a biscuit.

  • I know how much you love them, so I

  • bought some for us to share today.

  • Oh right. That's very kind, Feifei, but very odd.

  • You don't normally buy me things.

  • Are you feeling guilty?

  • Have you done something wrong?

  • Of course not! Wellsort of.

  • I hope you don't mind, but I used up all your coffee

  • when I made drinks for the team this morning.

  • What?! You used up all my coffee

  • and you didn't make me one?

  • That really takes the biscuit!

  • I haven't taken any biscuits, just your coffee.

  • No, Feifei! When I say someone really

  • takes the biscuit, I mean what you

  • have done is really surprising, annoying

  • or sometimes just silly.

  • Oh dear. You're not happy? Sorry, Rob.

  • Let's hear some examples while you calm down.

  • I can't believe she copied my work

  • And pretended it was her own.

  • Now that really takes the biscuit.

  • You're really taking the biscuit if you're

  • expecting me to take you to the match

  • and wait outside until it's finished!

  • Your plan to turn the spare bedroom into

  • a snooker room really takes the biscuit!

  • This is The English We Speak from

  • BBC Learning English and we're finding

  • out about the phrase 'to take', or 'to really

  • take the biscuit', which means we are

  • surprised or annoyed by someone's actions.

  • Oh Rob, I'll buy you some more coffee.

  • I hope so. By the way, we can say 'something'

  • as well as 'someone' takes the biscuit.

  • So, you take the biscuit by using up my coffee

  • but there is something that really takes the biscuit.

  • Oh yes? What's that?

  • These biscuits you bought are ginger nuts.

  • I hate ginger biscuits. Didn't you know?

  • Oh that really takes the biscuit!

  • OK, Rob. You are really taking this badly.

  • Pass them over here then and I'll eat them.

  • Oh crumbs, I've dropped them. Sorry!

  • It looks like I won't be taking any of my biscuits today!

  • Come on, Rob. I'll buy you a coffee.

  • Thanks. Bye.

  • Bye.

  • Hello! This is The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei.

  • And I'm Rob.

  • We may sound a little different.

  • That's because we are not able to

  • record in our normal studios

  • during the coronavirus outbreak.

  • This programme comes with a safety warning!

  • It involves bullets.

  • Well, not real ones. That would be dangerous.

  • Toy bullets ... just to illustrate the point.

  • Bullets! What English expression mentions bullets?!

  • I will explain and, Rob, you can help.

  • Here is a toy bullet.

  • Where did you get that from?!

  • Don't ask. Now, Rob, would you put

  • it between your teeth please?

  • What? Are you crazy?!

  • Please, Rob. It would really help our audience.

  • OK, Feifei! Here goes...

  • Right, I am biting the bullet.

  • So, Rob, you are being brave and forcing yourself

  • to do something unpleasant, but necessary.

  • I didn't force myself, you told me to do it!

  • Sorry, Rob, I can't understand you but when

  • someone 'bites the bullet', they are forced to,

  • or accept that they have to,

  • do something difficult or unpleasant.

  • Let's hear some examples of other people

  • who have to bite the bullet.

  • I have a pile of work to finish, so

  • I'm going to have to work all night.

  • I guess I'll have to bite the bullet.

  • If I'm going get fit, I'll have to bite the

  • bullet and start going to the gym. Urghh!

  • If you want to start dating Jitka you're going

  • to have to bite the bullet and ask her out!

  • This is The English We Speak from

  • BBC Learning English, and we're talking

  • about the expression 'to bite the bullet'.

  • It describes having to do something

  • unpleasant or difficult, but necessary.

  • So, can I stop biting a bullet now, please?

  • Not yet, Rob. What you are doing is 'necessary'.

  • Yes, but it's not easy speaking with

  • a bullet in your mouth.

  • Exactly! Peace and quiet. But careful, Rob.

  • Don't swallow it, otherwise things

  • could get very unpleasant.

  • Thanks for the advice, Feifei... ooops.

  • Bye, Rob.

  • Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei.

  • And me, Neil.

  • In this programme, we have an expression

  • you can use to describe someone who talks

  • confidently about a topic, but might not

  • actually know that much about it.

  • Which reminds me, Feifei.

  • Did I tell you that I've started a new evening course?

  • No. What's it in?

  • Well, see if you can guess.

  • Ahem. My lords, ladies and gentlemen.

  • It is indeed an immense honour and privilege

  • to stand here before you on this great

  • occasion and humbly offer my thoughts.

  • Er, Neil. What are you going on about?

  • Public speaking! It's my new course.

  • Right. Well, you can certainly talk the talk.

  • Oh good. That's the whole point.

  • Hmm. That's not really a compliment.

  • When we say someone can talk the talk,

  • it means they talk a lot about a subject,

  • but they might not really know

  • that much about it.

  • Even if they sound confident.

  • How dare you! Well, let's hear some

  • examples of this expression in action.

  • Oh no, not another meeting chaired by Binh.

  • He can certainly talk the talk but

  • he actually knows nothing!

  • OK, go in there, talk the talk, and get out

  • before they realise we don't have

  • a clue about marketing!

  • It's one thing talking the talk, but we need action.

  • We need someone who can walk the walk.

  • You're listening to The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English.

  • In this programme, we're looking at

  • the expression 'talk the talk'.

  • It refers to people who talk confidently

  • on a topic without necessarily

  • knowing much about it.

  • That's right, Feifei. You know,

  • you're really quite knowledgeable

  • about the English language, aren't you?

  • Thanks.

  • I mean, you don't just talk the talk.

  • You can walk the walk too.

  • Absolutely! As you heard in the earlier example,

  • and just then from Neil, the opposite

  • of 'talk the talk' is 'walk the walk'.

  • That refers to someone who shows their

  • abilities through action - not just talking.

  • Like you, Neil.

  • You know what? I think I'll give up that public

  • speaking course and join a hiking club -

  • to learn how to walk the walk.

  • Ha! Good idea.

  • Bye!

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei but I'm not sure where Neil is.

  • Sorry I'm late.

  • It's going a bit crazy out there in the office.

  • Crazy?

  • Yes. Everybody is arguing and shouting.

  • About what exactly?

  • The mess in the office.

  • The boss says it's untidy and we

  • should clear up after ourselves.

  • He even said that my desk was like a pigsty!

  • Hmm, well you'd better stay in here and keep

  • out of the way until things have calmed down.

  • Good idea. I'll just let the dust to settle.

  • Oh, so the office is messy and dusty.

  • Is that what everyone's arguing about. The dust?

  • No Feifei, I just mean I'll wait for

  • the situation to calm down.

  • Got it!

  • So, you're just keeping out of the way.

  • Are you scared?

  • Of course not.

  • I just wanted to hear these examples.

  • We've had lots of complaints about the changes but

  • let's wait until the dust settles before we respond.

  • We're busy moving house at the moment

  • but I'll give you a call when the dust settles.

  • Now the dust has settled after the restructuring,

  • I think we can talk about recruitment.

  • This is The English We Speak from the BBC

  • and we're finding out about the phrase

  • 'let the dust settle', which means to

  • wait for a situation to calm down.

  • We can also say 'wait for the dust to settle',

  • which is what I'm doing right now.

  • Neil, I have a feeling you're just

  • avoiding the situation for one reason.

  • Oh yeah, what's that?

  • Look out there.

  • They're all pointing at your desk.

  • They're not arguing about a messy office.

  • They're complaining about your mess.

  • Really. Well I like to work in a messy environment