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  • If youre anything like me, youve wanted to avoid COVID, not just because of the immediate effects of the disease,

    如果你和我一樣,你一直想避免COVID,不僅僅是因為這個疾病的直接影響。

  • but also because of the way those effects can lingereven in just mild cases.

    但也因為這些影響可能持續存在--即使只是輕微的情況。

  • And this is crucial to how COVID can make us so sick in so many different ways...

    而這對COVID如何在許多不同的方面使我們生病至關重要......

  • and potentially, for so longincluding your braineven after you test negative.

    而且有可能,在這麼長的時間裡,包括你的大腦--即使在你測試陰性之後。

  • See, SARS-CoV-2 (which is the virus that causes COVID-19) enters your cells using a receptor called ACE-2,

    看,SARS-CoV-2(也就是引起COVID-19的病毒)利用一種叫做ACE-2的受體進入你的細胞。

  • which is a surface protein that tons of our cells have, especially the epithelial ones.

    這是一種表面蛋白,我們的細胞都有,尤其是上皮細胞。

  • Epithelial cells line our organs and our blood vessels...theyre a HUGE part of our body.

    上皮細胞排列在我們的器官和血管中......它們是我們身體的一個巨大部分。

  • ACE-2 is essentially like a doorknob and it’s how the virus lets itself into our cells.

    ACE-2本質上就像一個門把手,它是病毒讓自己進入我們細胞的方式。

  • See, ACE-2’s normal job is to help our cells regulate things like blood pressure and inflammation.

    看,ACE-2的正常工作是幫助我們的細胞調節血壓和發炎等事情。

  • When the virus binds to ACE-2, that receptor can’t perform its normal job.

    當病毒與ACE-2結合時,該受體就不能執行其正常工作。

  • Blood pressure regulation goes out the window. Inflammation runs wild, blood clotting gets wonky, and cell death goes up,

    血壓的調節被拋在腦後。發炎肆虐,血液凝固變得不正常,細胞死亡上升。

  • resulting in tissue damage.

    導致組織損傷。

  • And because the virus binds to ACE-2, and ACE-2 is all over your epithelial cells,

    而且因為病毒與ACE-2結合,而ACE-2遍佈你的上皮細胞。

  • and those epithelial cells are all over your body, the virus can cause this chaos everywhere,

    而這些上皮細胞遍佈你的身體,病毒可以在各處造成這種混亂。

  • and that chaos doesn’t just go away.

    而這種混亂並不會就此消失。

  • So, many projects, like this upcoming study led by Yale, are looking into the symptoms people are still experiencing, long after their initial infection

  • what’s called long-COVID, or post-COVID syndrome.

    這就是所謂的long-COVID,或post-COVID綜合徵。

  • Here’s what we know so far: Fatigue, muscle weakness, and continued loss of smell are by far the most commonly reported lingering symptoms.

    以下是我們迄今所知的情況。疲勞、肌肉無力和持續喪失嗅覺是迄今為止最常報告的遺留症狀。

  • Many experience continued shortness of breath, chest pain, and heart palpitations.

    許多人經歷了持續的呼吸短促、胸痛和心悸。

  • The CDC reports that an autoimmune condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome, where different body parts can become swollen,

    疾病預防控制中心報告說,一種叫做多系統發炎綜合徵的自身免疫性疾病,不同的身體部位會變得腫大。

  • may persist after the acute infection period.

    可能在急性感染期過後仍然存在。

  • We see persistent headaches, diarrhea, even bone pain, and preliminary research indicates that long-term kidney function may be reduced.

    我們看到持續的頭痛、腹瀉,甚至骨痛,初步研究表明,長期的腎臟功能可能會降低。

  • But what may surprise you is what we see in the brain.

    但可能讓你吃驚的是我們在大腦中看到的情況。

  • We know that severe COVID infection can cause brain damage either directly (through inflammation of the tissues around the brain),

    我們知道,嚴重的COVID感染可以直接(通過大腦周圍組織的發炎)造成大腦損傷。

  • or indirectly (by depriving your brain of oxygen as a result of heart and lung damage).

    或間接地(通過剝奪你的大腦的氧氣,作為心臟和肺部損傷的結果)。

  • Early studies are also indicating that some people who had just mild-moderate illness

    早期的研究也表明,一些只是有輕度-中度疾病的人

  • are still exhibiting impaired attention and focusmonths after their infection.

    感染後幾個月,仍然表現出注意力和焦點受損。

  • Some researchers think this is linked to those underlying inflammatory effects of COVID.

    一些研究人員認為這與COVID的那些潛在發炎效應有關。

  • This issue could be the result of silent mini-strokes, which may have deprived areas of the brain of adequate blood flow,

    這個問題可能是無聲的小中風的結果,它可能使大腦的某些區域失去了足夠的血流。

  • disrupting the connection between different areas of the brain.

    破壞了大腦不同區域之間的聯繫。

  • Many people who struggle with long-term COVID symptoms report experiencing brain fog, like trouble focusing and poorer short-term memory,

    許多與長期COVID症狀作鬥爭的人報告說,他們遇到了腦霧,如難以集中注意力和較差的短期記憶。

  • and we still don't really know why.

    而我們仍然不知道原因。

  • Plus, weve seen how COVID can really get us down.

    另外,我們已經看到了COVID如何真正讓我們失望。

  • In a study of more than 230,000 people, 1 in 3 later developed some kind of psychiatric or neurological issue,

    在一項對23萬多人的研究中,每3人中就有1人後來出現了某種精神或神經系統問題。

  • ranging from anxiety to Parkinson’s-like symptoms.

    從焦慮到類似帕金森的症狀不等。

  • That’s a much higher rate than in those who didn’t have COVID, or in those who another respiratory illness like the flu.

    這比那些沒有感染COVID的人,或那些另一個呼吸道疾病如流感的人的比率高得多。

  • Now, it’s hard to tell if the development of something like anxiety or depression was due to the biological effect of the virus

    現在,很難說像焦慮或抑鬱症這樣的發展是否是由於病毒的生物效應所致

  • or if it’s more psychosocial, because of things like lost income or self-isolation.

    或者,如果是社會心理方面的原因,比如收入損失或自我封閉。

  • But the uniquely high rate of developing something like a stroke or dementia is definitely linked to the molecular actions of the virus.

    但是獨特的高中風或痴呆症等疾病的發生率肯定與病毒的分子作用有關。

  • I know all of this sounds really scary, but the global medical community is working really hard to understand more about these long-term effects,

    我知道所有這些聽起來非常可怕,但全球醫學界正在非常努力地工作,以瞭解更多關於這些長期影響。

  • and what we can do about them.

    以及我們能為它們做什麼。

  • Some early studies are finding that physical rehabilitation, especially with a focus on retraining your diaphragm and your breathing

    一些早期的研究發現,物理康復,特別是著重於重新訓練你的橫膈膜和你的呼吸

  • can help you bounce back from COVID.

    可以幫助你從COVID中反彈回來。

  • Some teams are suggesting treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs to combat chronic, low-grade inflammation

    一些團隊建議用抗炎藥物進行治療,以對抗慢性、低度的發炎

  • leftover from active infection.

    活動性感染的遺留物。

  • So, if youre struggling with persistent symptoms after your acute illness has passed, then maybe see if there’s a study near you that you can sign up for

    是以,如果你在急性疾病過去後還在與持續的症狀作鬥爭,那麼也許可以看看你附近是否有一個可以報名參加的研究------。

  • weve left some resources in the description.

    我們在描述中留下了一些資源。

  • If you can add your voice to the chorus, the more data well haveand the faster we can find better solutions.

    如果你能在大合唱中加入你的聲音,我們將擁有更多的數據--我們就能更快地找到更好的解決方案。

  • Don’t be afraid to reach out to advocacy groups, too—f there’s something wrong, they can help you get your doctor to take it seriously.

    也不要害怕與宣傳團體聯繫--如果有問題,他們可以幫助你讓醫生認真對待。

  • And if you haven’t yet been infected, I hope all this helps you realize how important it is to keep minimizing your exposure risk,

    如果你還沒有被感染,我希望這一切能幫助你認識到不斷減少你的暴露風險是多麼重要。

  • even as more people get vaccinated.

    即使有更多人接種疫苗。

  • If you want to learn more about what’s in the COVID vaccine and why, you can check out this video here,

    如果你想了解更多關於COVID疫苗的內容和原因,你可以在這裡查看這個視頻。

  • and if you have questions about anything we covered in this video, leave them for us in the comment down below.

    如果你對我們在本視頻中涉及的任何內容有疑問,請在下面的評論中給我們留言。

  • Also check out those resources we left in the description, and make sure you subscribe to Seeker for all your important COVID news.

    也請查看我們在描述中留下的那些資源,並確保你訂閱Seeker,以獲得所有重要的COVID新聞。

  • As always, thanks for watching. I’ll see ya next time.

    一如既往,感謝您的觀看。下一次見。

If youre anything like me, youve wanted to avoid COVID, not just because of the immediate effects of the disease,

如果你和我一樣,你一直想避免COVID,不僅僅是因為這個疾病的直接影響。

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B2 中高級 中文 covid 細胞 發炎 大腦 病毒 症狀

COVID-19的長期影響是什麼? (What Are the Long-Term Effects of COVID-19?)

  • 66 6
    Summer 發佈於 2021 年 06 月 09 日
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