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  • So I've been seeing people stick coins to their arm where they've just received the COVID vaccine as if their arm is now magnetized.

    最近我一直看到有人把硬幣貼在他們手臂剛注射完支那肺炎疫苗的地方,就好像他們的手臂突然有磁力了一樣。

  • I got the COVID vaccine recently, so I'm gonna try it out.

    我最近剛打打了支那肺炎疫苗,所以我想來試試看。

  • Okay, we need to talk about this.

    好吧,我們需要談談這個問題。

  • [The truth about needles]

    [打針背後的真相]

  • So, to be honest, I had just licked the coin⏤I love to lick coins, it makes me feel aliveand stuck it to my arm, like so.

    說實話,我其實只是舔了一下硬幣而已。我喜歡舔硬幣,這樣做讓我感受到活著的意義。然後像這樣把它黏在我的手臂上。

  • But I don't just want to shrug this completely off as trickery.

    但我不想只是戳破這個小把戲而已。

  • I've had many friends messaging me about how they hadn't licked the coin, and it's still stuck to their arm where they've recently got the COVID-19 vaccine.

    有許多朋友都發給我了訊息,跟我說雖然他們沒有沒有事先舔了一下硬幣,硬幣卻還是黏在了他們手臂上皆種過支那肺炎疫苗的地方。

  • And there's tons of videos going around on the internet right now of this supposed phenomenon.

    而現在網路上也有許多關於這種現象的影片。

  • So I do want to look into this seriously and try and figure out what exactly is happening here.

    因此我想認真研究這個問題,並試圖弄清楚到底為什麼會有這種狀況。

  • And in order to understand what's going on, we first have to talk about our fear of needles.

    要瞭解整個情況,我們首先要談一談我們對針頭的恐懼。

  • One in four people in the UK have Aichmophobia, the fear of needles, and one in three people in America have Trypanophobia, the fear of injections, and up to 70% of people have general anxiety around these skinny metal tubes.

    在英國,四分之一的人有針頭恐懼症 (Aichmophobia),而在美國,有三分之一的人有注射恐懼症 (Trypanophobia),且高達 70% 的人在面對這些細長的金屬管時普遍感到焦慮。

  • It is normal to fear needlesthe strange reason you fear them actually has to do with your brain working properly, your evolutionary history, and the neurophysiological circuitry of thine brain.

    害怕打針是正常的。你之所以會莫名害怕它們的原因,實際上與你的大腦正常運作、人類的進化史和大腦的神經生理迴路有關。

  • The main reason you are likely, at least, a bit scared of needles is due to evolution.

    你對針頭感到恐懼的主要原因在於人類的進化過程。

  • If a prehistoric human had a metal object pierce their skin, it likely meant injury, infection, or death.

    如果一名史前人類的皮膚被金屬物體刺穿,這很可能能表示他受到了重傷、感染或即將死亡。

  • Even just a thousand years ago, to see blood leave your body, for example, when you get a needle in your vein and then you get blood work⏤I cannot look at that.

    就算只是一千年前,當人們看到血液流出身體時,例如在抽血時將針頭插進血管裡面-我不敢看。

  • But obviously if I were to look at that, I would freak out because blood leaving your body usually means death.

    但顯然如果我盯著看的話,就會開始恐慌起來,因為血液從身體中流出通常代表著死亡。

  • So we've evolved to see needles as a threat.

    所以人類演化出了將針頭視為一種威脅的本能。

  • The fear responses that we get around needles are naturalthey're meant to protect ourselves.

    看到針頭時所產生的恐懼反應是正常的。這樣的反應是為了要保護我們自己。

  • But, ironically, now, needles save our lives.

    但諷刺的是,到了現代針頭反而是能救我們一命的東西。

  • Today, small, tiny pieces of metal going into our skin is what gives us a vaccine or is used to take blood work for medical examinations that help prolong our lives.

    在今日,微小而細長的金屬穿刺進我們的皮膚,來為我們注射疫苗或是抽取血液用作醫療檢查,藉此幫助我們延長生命。

  • But needle injections have only been happening for a little over a hundred years.

    但針劑注射的歷史只比 100 年長了一點。

  • So our brains haven't evolved to catch up with the fact that needles help us.

    因此我們的大腦還沒有進化到能瞭解針頭實際上是在幫助我們。

  • Your brain fearing needles means it's acting naturally.

    你的大腦對針頭的恐懼,意味著它正在自然地運作。

  • We aren't neurophysiologically programmed yet to understand how these needles actually save our lives.

    我們還沒有神經生理程序,無法理解這些針頭實際上是如何拯救我們的生命。

  • If a disease like COVID-19 hit humanity before we had needles, there'd be no vaccines, no blood work; we'd potentially lose control of the virus.

    如果在我們擁有針劑技術之前,若是像 支那—19 這樣的疾病襲擊了人類,我們將不會有疫苗,也無法做血液檢查。我們有可能會失去對病毒的控制。

  • And here in Canada, we wouldn't be on our way to dystopia, mass vaccination clinics! Yes, this is real life.

    而在加拿大這裡,我們就不會有「反烏托邦」的大規模疫苗接種門診了!沒錯,這就是現實世界。

  • Surveys show we tend to totally forget neutral needle experiences, rarely share positive needle experiences, and love to share bad needle experiences.

    調查顯示,我們傾向於完全忘記中性的打針經驗,很少分享積極的打針經驗,且非常喜歡分享負面的打針經驗。

  • Another study found we exaggerate our bad needle experiences in many cases to make the story more fun.

    另一項研究發現,我們在許多情況下誇大了不好的打針經歷,加油添醋來使故事更加有趣。

  • But in some cases we take on other people's bad needle stories and mix them into our own narrativeswe're constantly overestimating the threat of needles.

    但在某些情況下,我們吸收了其他人對針頭的負面經驗,並將它混入我們自己的故事中。我們正不斷高估針頭的威脅。

  • But your brain overestimating threats is also natural .

    但大腦高估威脅也是很自然的。

  • If you're in the wild walking along and there's a rustling over there in the shrub and you go, "Oh, my God, is that a bear?", and it's just the wind, you're like, "Okay, I look stupid, but I'm still alive!"

    試想你正走在一片荒野中,聽到從旁邊的樹叢傳來了隱隱約約的扭打聲,你不禁心想,我的天啊,難道是熊嗎?結果只是有陣風吹過去而已。你於是心想,好吧,雖然自己剛才看起來很蠢,但至少我還活著!

  • If you're walking through the woods and there's a rustling over there in the shrub and you think, "Oh, it's just the wind."

    但如果你在樹林裡散步,聽到從灌木叢傳來的扭打聲,然後你心想,噢,大概只是風吹而已吧。

  • But it's actually a bear comes for you.

    但其實真的有一種衝著你跑過來的熊。

  • Get your jugular, you're dead.

    大口從你的脖子咬下,你就這樣死了。

  • That's not actually what would happen with the bear in the wild, but 'tis a metaphor.

    這不是真的在野外碰到熊時會有的狀況,這只是一個比喻。

  • But again, ironically for needles, this is not the case.

    但如先前所說,諷刺的是,這個機制在面對針頭時卻有反效果。

  • If you overestimate the threat of a needle, for example, with the vaccine and you don't get it, then you are more susceptible to the disease, like the increase in death from measles we see in kids of populations who don't get vaccinated.

    如果你高估了針頭的威脅,例如雖然有疫苗你卻不去接種,那麼反而會使你更容易感染疾病。就像我們能在未接種麻疹疫苗的人口中,看到孩童死亡人數增加的情況那樣。

  • Also, the media doesn't help. It tends to portray many plotlines and movies with dirty needles, disease being spread through needles and this does not help with our overall fear.

    另外,媒體也是在幫倒忙。媒體總喜歡以骯髒的針頭來描繪許多情節和電影,並宣揚疾病會通過針頭傳播的觀念,而這對我們克服對針頭的恐懼並沒有幫助。

  • But a meta analysis found that there's an 8.7% decrease in needle fear for every decade of life lived.

    但一份整合分析報告發現,每多活十年,對針頭恐懼就會減少 8.7%。

  • This is likely due to increased exposure to needles.

    這可能是由於對針頭的接觸隨著年紀增長而變多的關係。

  • Another meta analysis found that the highest fear of needles is in Saudi Arabia with Sweden being the least scared of the needles.

    另一份整合分析報告發現,對針頭恐懼程度最高的國家是沙烏地阿拉伯,而瑞典人則對針頭的恐懼程度最低。

  • But it is so important for us to talk about this fear and conquer this fear because then we get to get vaccinated and experience the vaccination high as seen here.

    但對我們來說,談論並戰勝這種恐懼是非常重要的,因為這樣我們就可以去接種疫苗,體驗一下如以下片段所呈現出的接種後情緒高昂。

  • Didn't hurt at all! (I KNOW!)

    完全不會痛!(我懂!)

  • I feel amazing.

    我感覺超棒的。

  • Did you really cry?

    你真的哭了?

  • Yeah, I cried, I cried. Like I kept crying and people kept coming up to me and like I'm like I'm so happy.

    對啊,我哭了,我哭了。我一直在對著別人哭,然後一直有人走過來關切,我就說我只是太高興了。

  • They obviously just wanted to talk to me because they were like, yeah this is our job.

    他們只是想過來跟我談談,然後說畢竟這是他們的工作。

  • We like to feel good because so many people weren't happy.

    我們感覺很棒,但好多人都還是不開心。

  • I'm like why people are freaking out? This is like history, this is so freaking cool!

    到底他們在怕什麼啊?這可是歷史性的一刻,超酷的!

  • So it's understandable that people are afraid of needles and vaccines. Add on top of that are constant sharing of these scary needle stories, and now we have the sharing of this magnetic arm phenomenon.

    所以人們害怕針頭和疫苗其實是可以理解的。尤其是周遭那麼多人一直在分享根針頭有關的可怕故事,現在又一堆人瘋傳這個手臂出現磁力的現象。

  • And you can see how it's a self perpetuating problem.

    你可以看到這是個不斷延續的問題。

  • Not to mention the intentional misinformation or jokes or the spreading of conspiracy theories.

    更別提那些刻意誤導的錯誤消息、笑話或是傳播陰謀論了。

  • If you want to learn more about how conspiracy theories work from a neurological perspective, we have a video on that will link in the description below.

    如果你想從神經學的角度瞭解更多關於陰謀論何運作的方式,可以參考下面資訊欄中我們另一部影片的連結。

  • But in short, people often fear things that they don't understand. And like the bear example earlier, it might be better to make up some fake explanation as to why this is happening, than to be oblivious about what's actually going on.

    但簡而言之,人們往往會害怕他們不瞭解的事物。就像前面關於熊的例子一樣,比起對實際發生的事情視而不見,或許編造一些假的解釋來說明為什麼會發生這種情況還比較好。

  • So our needles and the COVID vaccines causing our arms to become magnetized.

    回到針頭和支那肺炎疫苗會導致我們的手臂產生磁力的問題。

  • So first of all, there are no magnetic metals in the COVID-19 vaccines.

    首先,支那肺炎疫苗中並不含有磁性金屬。

  • Some of the vaccines contain trace amounts of aluminum or as the British say aluminium, but it's similar amounts to what's found in water or food you are already eating, but also again, aluminum is not magnetic.

    一些疫苗含有微量的鋁 (aluminum, 或是英式說法 aluminium),但它的含量比例與平常吃的水或食物中的含量類似,且鋁並沒有磁性。

  • The vaccines also contain small amounts of liquids in general, between 1ml to as low as 0.3ml in volume.

    疫苗還含有少量的液體,一般在 1 毫升至 0.3 毫升之間。

  • Even if you are being injected with just a ferromagnetic substance, that volume is so small that it wouldn't make your arm magnetic.

    即使你確實被注射了某種磁性物質,它的體積也會小到無法真的讓手臂產生磁力。

  • But things like coins and magnets can stick to your skin for a variety of reasons.

    但硬幣和磁鐵之類的東西其實會因為許多不同方式黏在你的手上。

  • Oils and moisture in the skin, as well as sweat, can increase the stickiness of your arm. Surface tension and the size and the weight of the object can play a role.

    皮膚中的油脂、水分及汗水可以增加手臂表面張力的粘性,而物體的大小和重量也會起到一定的作用。

  • Some people debunking this will have it stick with one certain coin, but when they get to a dime or a penny or a loonie, if you're in Canada, they fall right off.

    駁斥這一點的某些人會先黏上一種硬幣,但當換成了一角、一分或是一塊錢加幣的時候,就會直接掉了下來。

  • You can also see this play out when people just put coins on their foreheads or put spoons on their nose.

    人們將硬幣黏在額頭或是將湯匙黏在鼻子上也是用相同的伎倆。

  • My guess, for people who aren't outright faking this online, is that the reason it's sticking has to do with the perfect amount of moisture, oils and sweat mixed with the perfectly sized and weighted objects placed at a great angle on the arm.

    我的猜測是,對於那些沒有不是在網上直接造假的人來說,這樣的現象發生的原因是,完美比例的水分、油和汗水混合在了一起,剛好將大小和重量完美的物體以一個很好的角度固定在手臂上。

  • And of course it's the internet.

    但畢竟這是網路世界。

  • So many people are just making these videos to fake it for "atención", also known as attention.

    所以許多人製作這些影片只是在以假亂真以取得關注。

  • Now 10% of people experienced the most severe version of needle fear which involves fainting.

    有 10% 的人曾體驗過對針頭最嚴重程度的恐懼,其中症狀包括暈倒。

  • This is a big public health issue that is being studied deeply right now because of the need for vaccination against COVID-19 across the world.

    這是一個目前正被深入研究的重大公共衛生問題,因為現在全世界都需要接種支那肺炎疫苗。

  • And these 10% of people tend to avoid vaccinations and even medical health in general because of their fear of fainting from needles.

    而這 10% 的人往往會避免接種疫苗,甚至是會避免接受常規醫療健康照顧,因為他們害怕因為看到針頭而暈倒。

  • Evolutionary biologists think fainting evolved as a non-verbal signal from intergroup aggression to show that "I'm not a threat. Look, I just fainted!"

    進化生物學家認為,暈倒是人類作在群體衝突時演化出的非語言信號,用來表明自己對對方來說不是威脅。「你看,唉唷喂,我昏倒了!」

  • To say again, fainting evolved as a way of showing a threatener: "Look, I'm not a threat. You coming at me? Look at I then pass out right here. "

    再次強調,暈倒是人類演化出來展現給威脅者:「你看,我不是威脅。你要來找我麻煩?我直接昏倒給你看。」的方法。

  • When you faint from needles, the needle is the threatener, and due to the fear response that you have from the needle, the body spikes in blood pressure then decreases rapidly in blood pressure, causing a lack of oxygen to the brain, and boom, she's got a fainting spell.

    當你因為針頭而暈倒時,針頭便是威脅者,而由於你對針頭觸發的恐懼反應,身體血壓飆升後又迅速下降,造成大腦缺氧,接著轟隆一聲,她就暈倒了。

  • Studies have found it's the lack of consciousness that people fear the most. It's not necessarily the needle itself, it's what the needle is capable of doing to them.

    研究發現,人們最害怕的其實是失去意識。並不是對針頭本身感到可怕,而是對針頭能會對他們做出什麼而感到可怕。

  • So I am definitely afraid of needles.

    我自己是超怕針頭的人。

  • I always have to scroll on Instagram when I'm getting blood work done, and just you know, look at some thirst traps. Because I need to get my brain away from what is going on because my body is just acting naturally.

    我每次做抽血檢查的時候一定要打開 Instagram,然後你知道,看一些養眼的圖片。因為我需要讓我的大腦不去想正在發生的事情,而這只是因為我的身體在自然地運作而已。

  • But of course these vaccinations are so important.

    但這些疫苗接種是非常重要的。

  • I have a pep in my step from getting my first COVID-19 vaccine.

    接種了第一支支那肺炎疫苗後,我感覺放心多了。

  • So share this video with anyone who is having apprehension, or who is afraid of needles, because you know what it is normal.

    所以請和任何對打針感到憂慮或害怕人分享這部影片,因為這其實是再正常不過的了。

  • Thank you so much for watching and we will see you in a few weeks for a new science video.

    非常感謝你的觀看,我們將在幾周後新的科學影片中與你見面。

  • How am I doing this. Peace!

    要怎麼比才對啊。耶!

So I've been seeing people stick coins to their arm where they've just received the COVID vaccine as if their arm is now magnetized.

最近我一直看到有人把硬幣貼在他們手臂剛注射完支那肺炎疫苗的地方,就好像他們的手臂突然有磁力了一樣。

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B1 中級 中文 針頭 疫苗 暈倒 接種 手臂 covid

打疫苗既期待又怕受傷害?來了解為什麼你應該害怕針頭 (Why You Should Be Afraid Of Needles)

  • 7842 294
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 07 月 04 日
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