Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • I'm at Ikea today.

  • Of course, we're gonna shop around.

  • Ikea. Ikea. Ikea, Ikea store.

  • I love Ikea. I've been shopping online, this

  • morning. I buy a lot of things from Ikea.

  • Yesterday. I love the princess cake.

  • While I was in Miami on vacation last week.

  • The Malm collection, of course.

  • And these at Ikea are $5.99.

  • It was such a great price, I actually grabbed a

  • second one. The Besta cabinet.

  • I don't think addicted, but if I had a bigger

  • allowance to shop there, probably.

  • Welcome to Ikea. The only place in the world

  • where you can snack on Swedish meatballs while

  • you shop for your new Poäng chair orrgrik mug.

  • Ikea has 433 stores in 53 countries.

  • Three hundred sixty-seven of them are owned and

  • operated by Ingka Group.

  • Despite serious product recalls and food court

  • scandals, Ikea is going strong.

  • There is something about the uniqueness with the

  • yellow and blue and the meatballs and the long

  • way through the stores and maybe the twinkle in

  • the eye as well. That makes us just a little bit

  • more human than others.

  • But that's just speculation.

  • Ikea's combined global and online presence is

  • massive. It brought in $45 billion in retail

  • sales, had 1 billion store visits and 2.8

  • billion online visits in 2019.

  • Its closest competitor in the home furnishing

  • space, Bed, Bath & Beyond, brought in $12 billion

  • in 2018 in in-store sales.

  • Before the massive blue and yellow warehouses,

  • there was a young Swedish man with a simple idea.

  • "Why are beautiful products only made for a few

  • buyers? It must be possible to offer good design

  • and function at low prices."

  • Ikea was founded in 1943 by 17-year-old Ingvar

  • Kamprad at Elmtaryd farm in Agunnaryd village in

  • Sweden. It started small, selling things like

  • pencils and postcards.

  • In 1948, Ikea started selling furniture.

  • In 2019, it sold seven million Billy bookcases.

  • A major reason people flock to Ikea is its price

  • point. When I hear Ikea, I think of cheap, simple

  • furniture that looks really nice.

  • Ikea falls in the affordable area of the

  • spectrum, but it depends on what you buy.

  • They have beds that start at $99.

  • They have really well designed beds that go up to

  • $500. The Ikea brand is sleek, minimal and

  • affordable. Ikea from its very beginning has

  • focused a lot on its customers building its own

  • furniture and therefore they could offer them

  • cheaper prices.

  • If you're starting out, you're moving into your

  • first apartment, you don't have a lot of money to

  • spend. Keep it simple.

  • Look at Nordic design.

  • Buy some simple Ikea pieces and invest in some

  • really nice bedding, a great rug, cool side

  • tables. Prices are lower in part because Ikea is

  • basically a giant storage facility for furniture

  • parts. It's the warehouse's design that sets it

  • apart. So what a great store will do will allow

  • you the pleasure of discovery.

  • So anytime I hear a retailer saying, "Our

  • consumers want to come in, take some stuff and

  • run out." Yes, they will.

  • If you didn't give them the pleasure of

  • discovery. So a great store will give you the

  • sense of comfort and familiarity and will also

  • give you the pleasure of discovery.

  • And that is when retail becomes retail therapy.

  • The winding maze is designed to make customers

  • stop and shop and spend more than they planned.

  • You walk through an Ikea store and you'll find a

  • number of mirrors.

  • Mirrors placed tastefully here, tastefully there,

  • on a table, on a closet, etc.

  • The brain is entranced with mirrors.

  • Why? Why?

  • When you look in a mirror, you see the most

  • gorgeous human being looking back at you.

  • Ikea plays to the narcissist in each of us.

  • Ikea employs mirrors everywhere through their

  • stores. As you walk by, you have love because you

  • have love for yourself in the mirror.

  • Point number one. Point number two, Ikea uses

  • white everywhere through the store.

  • White cupboards, white closets, white tables.

  • There is almost an App le-esque view.

  • If Apple was to design a closet, it would

  • probably look like an Ikea closet.

  • The brain perceives everything through context.

  • The notion of that white there symbolizes

  • clutter-free, pure, simple, transparent, without

  • saying all those words, through the judicious use

  • of white, that is spotless, Ikea communicates

  • what you aspire for your home.

  • The crisp, clean aesthetic lends itself to a

  • broad audience. But I kea doesn't just sell

  • furniture. Glassware.

  • I would always go to Ikea for glassware, dishes,

  • pots and pans.

  • I love their $500 solid wood bed.

  • Depending on the situation, they have some very

  • nice minimal sofas.

  • I do not shop at Ikea for bedding.

  • Pillows, duvets, comforters, sheets and towels I

  • think are items that you really want to invest

  • in. For families shopping at Ikea,

  • some locations have complimentary daycare .

  • With or without the kids,

  • shopping can be exhausting.

  • Do you know that the most tiring environment for

  • the entire human brain, the most tiring

  • environment, is a retail environment?

  • It is the worst environment for the human brain

  • simply because you're processing so much

  • information. But Ikea has a plan to keep you

  • energized. When I hear Ikea, I think of

  • meatballs. It recognizes that customers need

  • sustenance to keep shopping.

  • Right in the center of most stores, you'll find a

  • cafeteria serving up Swedish fare.

  • But in 2013, horse meat was detected in Ikea's

  • meatballs. The problem was traced back to a

  • European supplier and only affected European

  • stores. Ikea pulled all meatballs until this

  • issue was resolved.

  • Despite this news going viral, the iconic dish

  • remains on the menu. Another Ikea classic: the

  • cinnamon bun. Its placement near the exit is no

  • accident. There's a part of the brain that fires

  • every time you pay.

  • Right? And so by having the scent of baking, of

  • warmth, of sugar in particular, that takes the

  • stress out, they get down the stress of payment.

  • And therefore the experience is memorable without

  • it overwhelming you with how much money you spent

  • out there. But whether you buy Ikea furniture in

  • the store or online, once you open the boxes,

  • it's time to get to work.

  • The problem with Ikea was you realized that the

  • closet was so minimalist and beautifully

  • designed. But, oh my God.

  • There are 10 million parts I got to put together

  • to get the minimalistic design.

  • What I don't like is that you have to put

  • everything together by yourself.

  • Like, I want a delivery!

  • Deliver it to me and put it together.

  • Like, what if you're a single mom?

  • You don't have anybody to do that for you.

  • However, according to a 2011 study by Harvard

  • Business School, you are more inclined to value

  • an item you built yourself.

  • The study even named this phenomenon the "Ikea

  • Effect." But many customers don't want to

  • assemble their own furniture.

  • One of the other really big trends we're seeing

  • is a shift toward services.

  • So you have people like Amazon that are offering

  • convenience. Now, all of a sudden, it's not just

  • how good is a product in your store, it's what

  • kind of simplicity can we offer our customers?

  • The Besta cabinet is the most versatile.

  • It stands on legs.

  • You can hang it on the wall.

  • Anything you need the Besta unit to do, I highly

  • advise it. Hire TaskRabbit to put it together and

  • hang it on the wall. It'll just make your life

  • easier. So in 2017, Ikea acquired TaskRabbit.

  • Now, for a flat fee, Ikea customers can hire

  • TaskRabbit to do the assembly.

  • Since the acquisition TaskRabbit's, furniture

  • assembly tasks have gone up from 2 % to 10 %.

  • There's been a lot going on with Ikea lately.

  • Since 2010, the company has recalled millions of

  • products. The most infamous, the Malm line of

  • chests and dressers.

  • Ikea is recalling 29 million dressers for a

  • second time after the product was blamed for the

  • death of an eighth child in May.

  • Consumers are being asked to secure the items or

  • return them. It still sells these items today.

  • Ikea is currently making some necessary changes

  • to its business model.

  • One of the new things, if you like, is the

  • investments in digital.

  • Well, we have given ourselves three years to make

  • a massive transformation.

  • So if you want to do it at home on a Tuesday

  • evening when the kids are to bed and things are

  • done, we will try to bring our solutions and our

  • knowledge digitally to you.

  • It's investing in its online presence, delivery

  • services and opening smaller stores.

  • The majority of Ikea stores are operated by Ingka

  • Group. Its operating income, one measure of

  • profits, was down 26 % in 2018.

  • Ingka Group says the drop in profits is part of

  • the plan. Ikea will close its only U.S.

  • factory at the end of 2019.

  • Ikea Group, the owner of most Ikea furniture

  • stores worldwide, says it plans to cut 7,500 jobs

  • over the next couple of years.

  • Those cuts will be focused on administrative

  • staff positions. At the same time, however, the

  • group also says it will create 11,500 new

  • positions as it expands with new store formats

  • and online.

  • Ikea thrives on a business of quantity, not

  • quality. You can say that Ikea is the fast

  • fashion of home furnishings because it does

  • produce relatively inexpensive products that may

  • seem disposable because of the, say, average

  • quality. You know, whether or not Ikea is

  • sustainable because of that functionality of

  • encouraging people to buy more.

  • True sustainability would be people buying better

  • quality things that last longer.

  • And that results in fewer purchases.

  • But that is not how corporations work.

  • It seems like customers don't work that way

  • either. Depending on the country,

  • people will say that they care about the climate.

  • They care about sustainability.

  • But if there's a higher price tag, to that, it

  • will deter some people.

  • It's very easy to design a sofa for $3,000, but

  • to do a comfortable sofa with good quality that

  • the kids can jump up and down in with removable

  • covers, you can wash them, that is made of

  • sustainable foam that you can bring back in the

  • supply chain and make a new sofa.

  • And it's beautiful and comfortable at the low

  • price is very, very difficult.

  • So our fascination is around that problem, not to

  • make something expensive.

  • Ikea alone used 18 million cubic meters of

  • commercial wood in 2018.

  • It's making a conscious effort toward

  • sustainability. As of 2018, Ikea's Ingka Group

  • owns around 445,000 acres of responsibly managed

  • forests. Combined, that's bigger than Alaska.

  • Ingka Group has planted 3.6

  • million trees and had harvested 700,000 trees in

  • 2018. The clock is ticking.

  • So it's time for companies like us to commit and

  • start working out our plans and live with that

  • we might not have all the answers, but we will

  • find them in the decade or so to come.

  • While the company aims to make internal changes,