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  • About 1 million packages

  • arrive at John F. Kennedy International Airport every day.

  • And just like travelers have to go through customs,

  • so do international packages.

  • The US Customs and Border Protection, or CBP,

  • is tasked with screening all of them.

  • They're looking for anything that isn't

  • legally allowed in the US;

  • certain foods, animals, drugs, and counterfeit goods.

  • JFK is one of nine international mail facilities in the US.

  • It's essentially the country's biggest mail room,

  • dealing with roughly 60% of all

  • international packages entering the country.

  • First, the packages are taken off

  • arriving passenger or cargo planes

  • and transported to the US Postal Service's

  • mail room on site.

  • They're sorted and then taken to the CBP mail facility

  • next door for inspection.

  • CBP uses a three-tiered strategy

  • to efficiently search each of these packages;

  • intelligence gathering, nonintrusive inspection,

  • and hand inspection.

  • We followed two units searching

  • for drugs and counterfeit items.

  • Before a package ever lands in the US,

  • CBP gathers intelligence on the sender,

  • the container, and the aircraft.

  • They'll check with law-enforcement partners

  • like Homeland Security, the DEA, and the FBI

  • to see if there's anything of interest.

  • This is how CBP narrows down a million packages

  • to ones that will get flagged for further inspection.

  • Once a suspicious package is pulled,

  • it goes to the CBP inspection area.

  • This is where human CBP officers get a little help.

  • Here, a four-legged officer, like Alex,

  • will search hundreds of packages in 20-minute runs.

  • These dogs are trained to sniff out seven different drugs.

  • Michael Lake: The drugs that they are trained for

  • are hash, marijuana, cocaine, heroin,

  • methamphetamine, ecstasy, as well as fentanyl.

  • Narrator: If Alex finds something,

  • he'll notify his handler by sitting or lying down.

  • If he's right, he gets his chew toy.

  • Lake: This is the game that they work for.

  • All right, it's good play.

  • Here's a good boy, good boy.

  • Narrator: And if Alex or one of his furry friends

  • comes in contact with a drug,

  • officers have the antidote Narcan on hand.

  • Nearby, CBP officers are using another

  • nonintrusive search tool: X-rays.

  • Nathanial Needham: When I first started this,

  • I would literally open up everything

  • 'cause I couldn't tell what the image was.

  • But eventually, after you do thousands of parcels,

  • opening them up and comparing them to image,

  • now you start getting good. You can identify,

  • oh, that's this, oh, that's this.

  • We can let that go because of this.

  • Narrator: If they see something on an X-ray monitor

  • that looks suspicious, officers will isolate the package.

  • Needham: Can we pull that one, actually?

  • Narrator: Isolated packages go through an intrusive search.

  • Officers will cut them open

  • to hand-search for drugs or counterfeit goods.

  • Needham: I always got taught, basically,

  • expect a package to be something that's going to your mom,

  • so that if it is good, it's coming back to your mom

  • the same way that it's supposed to be.

  • This is common. It's, like, from back home.

  • It's pills, certain kind of vitamins,

  • and they get them from their little pharmacy.

  • I'm pretty sure that this right here is actually a steroid.

  • Needham: No.

  • The worst part is you don't know what's in these capsules.

  • Narrator: If the officer finds drugs,

  • the package is sent to Murielle.

  • Murielle Lodvil: That's 4,000-plus pills here.

  • Narrator: But if he finds a counterfeit good,

  • it's sent to Steve.

  • We'll start with Murielle.

  • Lodvil: The strangest areas that we find drugs concealed

  • are radio speakers or even car bumpers.

  • For some reason, they love to place cocaine in car bumpers.

  • It's crazy, where we even find drugs in Play-Dohs.

  • Also books, children books.

  • In between the lining of the pages, you'll find drugs there.

  • Narrator: Murielle tests the drugs

  • with a spectrometer called a Gemini.

  • Using lasers, the machine can pierce through packaging

  • and tell what drug is inside.

  • Lodvil: Right now, I'm gonna test this particular package.

  • It's telling me that it's ketamine.

  • It's used for horse tranquilizer and also painkillers.

  • Narrator: Murielle will label the drugs

  • based on where they fall among the DEA's drug schedules,

  • Schedule V being a drug with the lowest potential

  • for abuse or dependence, like Robitussin,

  • and Schedule I being a drug with the highest potential

  • for abuse, like ecstasy.

  • Lodvil: We have the GBL coming from the Netherlands,

  • and someone in New York is receiving it.

  • Steroid, a Schedule III, coming from Hong Kong.

  • Then we have the carisoprodol coming from India.

  • And then we have the tramadol coming from Singapore.

  • Narrator: Any scheduled drugs will be seized.

  • Lodvil: There is no day that we come to work

  • that we don't find anything.

  • Every day is a sense of importance because of the fact

  • that we taking out those particular drugs from the street.

  • Narrator: The narcotics unit had over 7,600 seizures

  • in 2018, including 246 pounds of cocaine

  • and over 360 pounds of ecstasy.

  • Now, back to Steve.

  • He's the one that gets all the counterfeit goods.

  • That's anything that infringes on a company's

  • intellectual property rights, or IPR.

  • Think fake Air Jordans, Gucci purses, or Rolex watches.

  • Companies like Louis Vuitton and Gucci

  • train Steve on the telltale signs

  • for spotting a fake.

  • While most of the tips are kept top secret

  • to protect the brand,

  • there are a few things that Steve could share with us.

  • Steve Nethersole: The first, when it comes in,

  • is the country of origin.

  • These high-end manufacturers here, Louis Vuitton, Gucci,

  • they're coming from France, Italy, Spain.

  • The watch is coming from Switzerland.

  • When it's coming from China, bing,

  • that's your No. 1 red flag.

  • Then you look at the dilapidated boxes,

  • so that's two red flags there.

  • A third thing is commingling.

  • The high-end manufacturers never commingle their products,

  • like, in other words, a Gucci inside

  • a Fendi or a Louis Vuitton.

  • These people will stuff watches, a wallet, inside a handbag.

  • And so, they'll never commingle their products.

  • They are so precise.

  • Some of the things I could say,

  • like, some of the manufacturers,

  • they don't put any of this in it, the filler, inside it.

  • They would never do that.

  • We'll look at the smell.

  • Sometimes it smells like petroleum.

  • It's not real leather.

  • We look at the stitching.

  • We look at the symmetry of the logos

  • by the manufacturer, the zippers.

  • This one here is a Coach bag with a Michael Kors zipper.

  • This coat has "Burbelly" on the buttons instead of Burberry,

  • so these are the comical things that we find

  • when you look at it up close,

  • and you could pick it right out.

  • Narrator: Counterfeit goods make up an estimated

  • trillion-dollar industry that's even been linked

  • to terrorist groups around the world.

  • In 2018, CBP had over 1,800 IPR seizures.

  • And if all those counterfeit goods had gone on

  • to sell at their suggested retail price,

  • they'd total an estimated $54 million.

  • So, where do all these seized goods end up anyway?

  • Well, most of the narcotics

  • and counterfeit goods will be sent

  • to a top-secret incinerator to be destroyed.

  • Some of the drugs will go under further testing,

  • while some of the counterfeit goods may be donated

  • if the offended company allows it.

  • But, in some cases, if the illegal goods are part

  • of a greater investigation, CBP officers will actually

  • put that package back in the mail.

  • Then, they'll track it

  • all the way to the person it was sent to.

  • This is known as a "controlled shipment."

  • Lodvil: I'm the one who opened that package,

  • and now I'm involved in this controlled delivery.

  • Now I get to finish the story.

  • All right, now we go out.

  • We knocked on your door, you open.

  • Hello, we noticed that you've ordered, you know,

  • this particular package.

  • It's MDMA.

  • What's the story behind it?

  • So then, we listen.

  • Narrator: But whether they're up against fake Guccis

  • or dangerous amounts of fentanyl,

  • CBP stands guard at the country's busiest mail facility.

  • Lake: This is where it comes.

  • You don't see it all the time coming across the border

  • in trucks and big bundles, like the TV will have you see.

  • This is where it's all coming from,

  • and it hits the street and it destroys lives.

  • So, in our way, if we can stop it here,

  • it's one less tragic story, probably,

  • that we're gonna have to hear about.

About 1 million packages

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    joey joey 發佈於 2021 年 05 月 26 日
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