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  • When the coronavirus shut down

  • public transportation and gyms,

  • Americans returned to a trusted classic: the bicycle.

  • In March, leisure-bike sales increased by 121% in the US.

  • By April, bike shops across the country

  • were cleared out of inventory.

  • Adam McDermott: At no point did we ever satisfy demand.

  • Narrator: And that demand

  • is still holding strong.

  • But bike companies

  • are facing a problem:

  • a shortage of bikes.

  • Adam: This whole shelf right here

  • all the way back to that side of the warehouse

  • is usually stacked with bikes,

  • and now there's nothing.

  • Narrator: We visited two bike shops,

  • one in LA and one in Arizona,

  • to see how they're keeping up

  • with this unprecedented surge in demand.

  • Mehdi Farsi: During typical times,

  • we have bikes in stock,

  • and we can ship them the bike that same day.

  • Narrator: That's Mehdi, the founder of State Bicycle

  • in Tempe, Arizona.

  • Usually, he sells 30 to 40 bikes a day.

  • But now, he's more than tripled

  • his daily orders, to 150.

  • Mehdi's bikes are made

  • in Taiwan and China.

  • Mehdi: In January and February,

  • right around the Lunar New Year,

  • all bike suppliers really were shut down

  • for at least four weeks.

  • Narrator: Then COVID-19 shut down the factories

  • for an additional month through February.

  • That happened just before demand for bikes

  • started to surge stateside, in mid-March.

  • Mehdi: Only a couple weeks later,

  • we were completely sold out of bikes.

  • Narrator: Even though bike shops

  • were deemed essential businesses,

  • Mehdi still had trouble bringing new bikes in.

  • Mehdi: Production times are getting longer and longer,

  • and that's why we're seeing

  • such a shortage of bicycles still.

  • Narrator: Over in Los Angeles,

  • Adam McDermott had a similar story.

  • His company, Linus Bike, was wiped clean of its bikes.

  • Adam: We immediately sold

  • through all our inventory,

  • and it was just like, waiting

  • for the next container.

  • And by the time that

  • next container arrived,

  • it was already completely sold out.

  • Narrator: Adam and his business partner, Chad Kushner,

  • started Linus Bikes back in 2007.

  • Customers can buy their '50s French-inspired city bikes

  • starting at $400 online.

  • Adam: Our web traffic increased by, like, 150%.

  • Like, every sector that we sell through,

  • we're seeing, you know, 100% increase in revenue.

  • Narrator: Built in Taiwan,

  • the bikes are sold all around the world.

  • But we stopped by the Simi Valley warehouse in LA.

  • Adam: We're down to kind of just the bare minimum here.

  • If we could just get more product,

  • that's really what we're facing right now.

  • Narrator: From his Venice Beach shop not too far away,

  • Adam's team would normally sell wheels to walk-in customers,

  • meaning they could buy a bike and take it home that day.

  • But since the pandemic, this isn't an option.

  • Adam: Inventory that was supposed to last us

  • the entire year, we were selling just in a matter of months.

  • So, at, like, peak, in July, we were back-ordering

  • for some models all the way to February,

  • which is insane for us.

  • Narrator: Linus went from selling

  • 1,200 units a month to about 4,000.

  • Now it's taking the company nearly

  • double the time to produce a single bike.

  • To keep up with demand, both companies had to get creative.

  • Mehdi: We quickly went to a preorder method

  • and started ramping up our production overseas.

  • Narrator: Mehdi also put a cap on the number of bikes

  • each of his 300 dealers could sell.

  • Mehdi: In order to prevent larger shops

  • from eating up all the inventory

  • and kind of taking away availability from some other shops.

  • Narrator: Over at Linus Bikes...

  • Adam: When COVID broke out, New Jersey,

  • where our other warehouse is,

  • the picture looked much worse there

  • for New Jersey and New York,

  • so we diverted all inventory to the West Coast,

  • just 'cause it seemed like this warehouse

  • will keep operating.

  • So, we're doing all our shipping from the West Coast.

  • It's a much bigger expense,

  • but at least we knew this warehouse would be functioning.

  • Narrator: Adam's also working on a new kind of inventory.

  • Adam: We just introduced e-bikes.

  • They're just landing now, so they're not even available.

  • We're still preselling them.

  • And those range from about $2,000 to $3,000.

  • It's a really massive kind of change.

  • It became a business of managing inventory

  • and trying to allocate inventory.

  • Where we can get the bike to the customer,

  • how we can, like, keep one customer happy

  • and not lose another customer.

  • Mehdi: If we had bikes in stock

  • that we could send to someone same day,

  • I could only imagine sales might be up 10X or more.

  • Narrator: Linus doesn't anticipate getting

  • many of its popular bikes back until 2021.

  • Adam: I think it's really key not to rest

  • on this crazy demand that is temporary.

  • I know it's temporary in some form.

  • I think if a business expects it or assumes it,

  • like, you'll pay for it later.

  • Mehdi: My advice for any other

  • small-business owner out there,

  • try to be as agile and flexible as you can

  • in order to adapt and survive.

  • Narrator: For both companies,

  • the biggest surges happened in cities,

  • where residents traded in crowded trains for bikes.

  • Adam: It's Portland, New York, Brooklyn, Chicago.

  • Los Angeles is a big market.

  • Mehdi: People just feel a lot more comfortable

  • commuting by bike versus subway trains or buses now.

  • Narrator: And the demand for two wheels

  • isn't expected to let up.

  • Adam: We think demand will hold into 2021.

  • Mehdi: With so many more riders

  • experiencing their cities on bikes,

  • the future of American cities

  • might actually transform as well.

  • More and more people are going to look to commute via bike,

  • which is obviously awesome for the environment.

  • We love to see that.

  • And, who knows, maybe the next Lance Armstrong

  • or the next Tour de France winner

  • has gotten on a bike during this pandemic,

  • and in several years' time,

  • we're gonna kind of see

  • the next great American road cyclist come out of this.

When the coronavirus shut down

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B1 中級 美國腔

自行车商店如何应对美国121%的需求激增](How Bike Shops Kept Up With America’s 121% Spike In Demand)

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    joey joey 發佈於 2021 年 05 月 25 日
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