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  • Hey guys, welcome back to the channel.

  • My name is Dami and I'm an architect in Vancouver. So today we're gonna talk about five skills that

  • you can start developing now, to prepare for architecture school.

  • [Acoustic Music]

  • You can start practicing these now

  • and they're gonna help build the foundation for your journey, not just in architecture

  • school, but on your path to becoming an architect. So when you start architecture

  • school, there's gonna be so much information thrown at you, that having these basic tools

  • under your belt will help you absorb more of that information, help you get a leg up

  • on your peers, and they might also help you avoid those all-nighters. These are things you

  • can practice little by little every day until you start school. Also, by the end of the

  • video, I will also teach you a little bonus trick that you can do with a q tip that has

  • saved me a lot of time for me when I was in school.

  • The first couple items I will cover all has to do with your communication skills, which

  • is kind of essential to your success in architecture. Your education is gonna be composed of: architectural

  • history, theory, building science, structures, sustainability, urban planning, and finally,

  • your design studio. So the design studio is where you take the culmination of all the things

  • that you've learned, and create your own design out of it. This project is gonna be your baby, a very

  • needy baby. It's gonna need feeding and nurturing, it's gonna be constantly on your mind when

  • you're in the shower or when you go to bed, and you

  • will be responsible for turning it into something amazing, and when it sucks, everyone is gonna

  • judge you and you will fail.

  • But it's also the best and most fun part of architecture school.

  • Anyways, as you go through the design process, you're constantly presenting to your peers,

  • your instructors, whether it's during desk crits or during your final presentation.

  • The most important thing to remember is: show, don't tell. You don't want to just

  • talk about your ideas, you actually want to show them, with sketches, drawings, or renders.

  • So the first skill i want you to practice every single day, is sketching.

  • [Acoustic Music]

  • We now use digital

  • modelling and computer renderings but sketching is still so important for you to get your

  • ideas out quickly and effectively.

  • If you're not good at sketching, that's totally fine. That's what practice is for. This is

  • something i learned in life drawing classes, it's that when you're just trying to learn,

  • don't go and try drawing the entire body. just try focusing on a small portion of it,

  • like the feet. so when you're at home, find an object that you find interesting and

  • try to draw a very small portion of it.

  • You really don't need to be a perfect drawer or get all the perfect

  • little details. I think what's most important is just being able to express your ideas with

  • your sketches, quickly.

  • So personally, I like to figure out the spatial relationships and the basic massing on paper,

  • and then I move into 3d modelling fairly quickly, because it's, for me, the fastest way to iterate

  • through a bunch of different massing options.

  • A crucial thing to always keep in mind is, you think by doing. A lot

  • of students miss this. You'll get a project brief, and they spend way too much time trying

  • to figure out the initial concept, or come up with the initial parti. and when it's time

  • for the desk crit, they only have a few scribbles. The concept is something you develop

  • over the span of your project, and it evolves as you go through the design process.

  • So when you're thinking or designing, just sketch out a bunch of different iterations, try to overlay

  • them on trace, by the process

  • of creating those things, you'll be able to see what works and what doesn't work and you can eliminate from there.

  • The modmin Youtube channel has some really great sketching tips, he also has a tutorial on rapid sketching,

  • so you can check that out.

  • Also, try to practice drawing some plans. You can start off my copying or tracing the

  • plans of some of the masters and just try to think about why they shaped the building a certain way,

  • what that does to the spaces and the movement or light conditions in those spaces, and what

  • that means to the overall concept of the building.

  • I would love to see your progress, so if you're drawing or sketching, follow me on Instagram

  • and tag me.

  • If you're struggling in the beginning in the beginning of school, don't even worry. I was a late

  • bloomer. I was terrible in school until second year. And if you're like me, you will have that one

  • project that will just ignite that fire in you. For me, it was a hydrotherapy pool. That project

  • really made me fall in love with architecture and the whole process

  • behind it. So yeah, just be patient, you will find that project too.

  • The second thing you can start working on right now, is all the digital tools.

  • [Acoustic Music]

  • when i was in school, we didn't have a dedicated course for learning all the programs, and

  • you were supposed to learn them on your own, so knowing how to use them right into

  • school will give you a huge advantage.

  • The most common ones are AutoCAD, SketchUp, Rhino, and Revit. I would say Sketchup is

  • probably the easiest for you to learn, and you can probably learn it in just

  • a week or two. with sketchup you can create whatever you want. Simple to more complex

  • geometries, and you can render them afterwards. I'll put together a playlist of Sketchup tutorials

  • that you can watch.

  • Then I would say try to learn AutoCAD, that's the software where you draw your floorplans,

  • elevations and sections. it's an industry standard, so if you're looking to get a summer

  • job, this and Revit will be very helpful to have. It's a bit more complicated, but learning

  • all the functions and shortcuts, they're gonna will help you further down the line.

  • The third program is Rhino. Rhino is kind of like Sketchup but you can do more things

  • with it. If you only have time to learn one of them, I would say

  • Rhino. You can just create more complex geometries, and I know that some architects say that the

  • software is just an extension of your pencil, but i really think that the infinite amount

  • of 3d modelling possibilities in rhino has really helped me in the creative process, and it's helped

  • me design geometries that probably would have taken me a very long time to figure out by hand

  • or on AutoCAD. For example, this project,

  • I wanted to create a torquing motion throughout the building, and I just started with a few

  • sketch models, sketched out a few plans, and just moved straight into Rhino, because I

  • could quickly iterate through a bunch of options and geometries, and I knew it was gonna take me

  • forever to figure it out on paper.

  • There's actually tons of really great rhino tutorials on youtube, you can just search Rhino

  • Tutorials, and their channel will take you from step 1.

  • And then there's Revit. Revit is an industry standard. it's

  • what you call a BIM software. So basically to create a building you would draw an actual

  • wall in the category of a wall, rather than drawing in two lines or a geometry that represents

  • a wall, as you would do in AutoCAD or Rhino. Then you would put in a roof, in the category

  • of a roof. For example if you were to model these two exact same things in Rhino, Rhino would just treat

  • this as a geometry, but Revit understands that this is a wall, and that this is a roof, a window. Revit's

  • an industry standard so it's a really great skill to have if you want to work at an arch firm over

  • the summer.

  • But there's some pros and cons.

  • The pro, is that once you create the walls or roofs, the 3d model is basically just created for you,

  • or visa versa. So once you create the 3d model, then you already have the 2d drawings, like the plans, sections, and elevations

  • so this obviously feels like a no brainer. Why would you go through Rhino, then Autocad

  • to prepare the drawings when you can just do it in Revit? Right?

  • So here's the con. Revit is a great tool to know when you start working in the industry and

  • definitely it creates a lot of efficiencies in the process but I think the danger of using Revit

  • in school is that, it can kind of limit your creativity. So for example, the default

  • wall in revit is a 2 by 4 stud wall going straight up. In architecture school, you want

  • to challenge the conventional idea of what a wall is, what a building looks like. so you

  • have to go through extra steps to design something that has a slightly more complex geometry.

  • I think when the default wall or roof looks like the industry standard, then your inclination

  • is to design boxy, very standard looking buildings. And I have seen projects change throughout

  • the years, once Revit was introduced in schools. So it's definitely something to think about.

  • The workflow that I have used when I was doing my Masters, is I would do

  • all my designs and modelling in Rhino, and I recreated the model in Revit to create the

  • floorplans. Coz I still like the way Revit creates the orthographic drawings

  • So Udemy has really good affordable Revit course for beginners, I took it and I have a couple

  • friends took it. So I'll put the link below. If you use my link, you won't pay a penny

  • more but I will get a little tip from the course.

  • Also, if you can teach yourself all the Adobe suites, like InDesign, Photoshop Illustrator, that's

  • also a bonus, because you will definitely be using all of them in school. There's tons of tutorials

  • you can find on Youtube or other online learning platforms.

  • And skill number three

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  • Understanding the basics of perspectives and composition helps a lot when you're doing

  • renderings, which you will be producing a lot of

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  • or for photographing your models.

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  • There's some general rules that you can follow, like keeping all your lines perfectly horizontal

  • or perfectly vertical. I do post-processing on all of my images, and it can also be a

  • fun way for you to learn programs like Photoshop or Lightroom.

  • I mentioned briefly earlier, your courses will contain your core architectural courses,

  • and your design course.

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  • One of those architectural courses is architectural history, where you

  • learn about the different architectural styles, and the culture, religion, or politics that

  • shaped that architecture.

  • Learning about the architectural past it will teach you how to think about architecture

  • and talk about architecture in a more meaningful

  • and intelligible way.

  • This stuff is really interesting when you actually spend the time to learn about it,

  • but when you're in school, and you have all these other things that you have to do,

  • learning about the medieval churches might not be the first thing on your mind. Like I remember

  • having a kind of hard time focusing on this particular course.

  • So i think this is something that you could try to learn when you have a little

  • bit more time now.

  • So I've created a playlist for you on my channel where you can learn about these different styles

  • in architecture. Some of these videos can be a little bit drab, so if you find any of them are kind of boring

  • just skip through them.

  • This is a book that you will probably be a required reading for school, so you might

  • as well just get it now, it covers all the different styles in a kind of chronological

  • order. It talks about cultural influences that shaped the architecture. But it is kind of

  • dense, maybe reading one section a day could help you get a little bit more into it.

  • [Music]

  • So in the first year of architecture school, I was so invested in my studio project that

  • i spent all my time into it, and a lot of my other core courses, they kinda suffered.

  • and I did lot of all nighters.

  • I mean, I can't stop you from doing them. If you gotta do it, you

  • gotta do it.

  • It can be kinda tricky to avoid those all nighters because you might have a new idea like

  • five days before your deadline, or your prof tells you to change something, and you're

  • like Agh F#$% I have to do it all over again.

  • And so what I would say about this, is that. Try to do a lot of work in the front end. Don't wait til a couple

  • weeks in to the deadline to make some big decisions in your design. Do as many iterations

  • as possible. And just throw out all your bad ideas. The more developed your idea is, it will be

  • easier to sell it to your professors during your crits, and you're gonna be more convinced

  • of your idea as well. I think a lot of students fall into the trap of trying to find the best idea,

  • but what's more interesting is the process and the story behind the idea.

  • During my thesis, we would have the hand in deadline for your work, where you submit all

  • your materials, and between that time and the presentation, that was about a week, and during that time, you

  • could figure out your presentation, and how to tell the story behind your project. I really

  • liked that approach, because everyone had very polished presentations.

  • ultimately, it doesn't matter how amazing your project is

  • if you can't convince your clients that it's an amazing idea.

  • So all that is to say. Start learning time management. Learn how to manage yourself.

  • Keep this constantly in the back of your mind as you're going through your daily life and

  • as you go through architecture school.

  • This is also connected to mental health.

  • mental health is the core of everything. School is just a stepping stone for you to get to the end

  • goal, which is to become a professional who is going to contribute to the betterment of

  • society. You can't have a positive influence on other people or become a mentor to them if you're

  • not healthy here. Mental health is just like physical health. It's something you have to

  • practice every day. Otherwise, you will get burnt out. I have seen so many architects

  • quit and complain about their work

  • So start getting in the habit of taking a

  • little bit of time to yourself, preferably doing something that's off the screen. Maybe

  • it's a little bit of meditation, quick cardio, or yoga. Take some time to think about what you're doing,

  • instead of just going through the motions.

  • This reflection can actually help you with your workflow as well. I think stepping back

  • to think about your struggles and inefficiencies can be a really good thing to incorporate into your

  • daily lifestyle.

  • So with all that being said, I promised would show one last trick that has helped me in school.

  • And it's a simple trick that you can do with a q tip.

  • cut the q-tip about in half

  • just try to take the cotton part out of it

  • and you do that with the other one as well

  • just cut it up

  • and you do this

  • and so now you have two of these

  • now what you can do is

  • I think you have a problem

  • you have to do a course about learning how to be funny

  • it's also creepy

  • ok you don't have to do it for real I think we got it

  • we got it

  • thank you

  • well I can't do it with my eyes my eyes are too

  • asian

  • alright alright thanks

  • you don't think that's funny

  • yeah it's super funny

  • we got the idea thank you

  • thank you very entertaining

  • well that was a fail

  • ok can we just see the real thing now?

  • so this is a real trick

  • it's something that you can do while you're making your model

  • you know, when you're putting together your model, usually you're pretty

  • tight on time

  • and you want to try to make it as fast as possible

  • and sometimes if you're doing sketch models you want to do that even faster

  • and

  • a lot of times when you're waiting for the glue to dry

  • it can take quite a bit of time

  • so I like to use a q tip

  • and put it on the model

  • and that instantly

  • makes the glue a little bit dry

  • on the cardboard or on that material

  • so when you stick it on, it kind of