A2 初級 美國腔 4772 分類 收藏
開始影片後,點擊或框選字幕可以立即查詢單字
字庫載入中…
回報字幕錯誤
Hi. My name's Rebecca. In today's lesson, you will learn what to call people in various
situations. Now, this may seem rather basic, but I've actually heard lots of foreigners
and English learners make mistakes in this area. So make sure to watch this lesson so
you don't make these basic mistakes. Okay?
So, how do you know what to call someone? Well, it depends on a lot of different factors.
Let's look at what some of them are first. So, is the situation formal or informal? Are
you talking to a man or to a woman? Are you speaking to one person or many people? Is
it somebody that you know? In other words, do you know their name or is it somebody unknown?
And is it a regular kind of a situation or is it a romantic situation?
Now, if it's a romantic situation, that's a whole other lesson, but in general, romantically
you may call someone: "sweetheart", "sweetie", "love", "honey", and so on, "baby", things
like that. Okay? That's romantic. In the rest of the lesson, we'll talk about all of the
other options. Okay?
So let's start first here. In the first part here at the top, I've marked what you should
do if you're talking to someone that you know. In other words, you know the name but it could
be a formal situation or an informal situation. Let's start with the formal situation.
Now, in some cases, we refer to the... A professional-only a few professionals, not all-we refer to them
by their title. What does that mean? For example: you may simply call someone: "Doctor. Doctor,
what should I do?" All right? You don't have to necessarily use the name; you can just
refer to him as "Doctor", so you're using his or her title. You could also do this for
Professor; you don't have to use the last name even though you may know the last name.
Let's say the name is Professor Black, but you don't have to say: "Professor Black",
you could just say: "Professor". All right? Or if you're talking to a police officer...
All right? And even if you see his badge, or his name, or something like that - you
could still just refer to the person, whether it's a man or a woman as: "Officer", and that
would do. And it's nice to do that, it's polite to do that, it might actually be rather important
for you to do that if you're talking to a police officer. Okay? So in some formal situations,
you can refer to the person by their title. These are probably the most common. All right?
Other than this, we don't usually refer to people as... By their title. Okay?
Now, if you know the name but it's a formal situation, so they're not good friends of
yours or something like that, then you use: "Mr." if it's a man with the last name. "Mr.
Jones". If it's a woman and you know that she's married, you can say: "Mrs. Smith".
If it's a woman and she's not married or you're not sure if she's married or not, then you
say: "Ms. Brown". Now, "Ms" is spelt: "M-s", but it's pronounced like: "Miz", "Ms.", "Ms.
Brown". Okay? So if you're going up to someone and you say: "Excuse me, Ms. Brown." Okay?
Or: "Excuse me, Mrs. Smith", and so on. Formal situations.
If it's an informal situation with a known person, then of course, you can use their
first name if in the past you have been told that it's okay to use their first name. So
if you called Mr. Jones, if you said to Mr. Jones: "Excuse me, Mr. Jones", and he says:
"Oh, that's okay. You can call me 'John'." Then, you can refer to him as John after that.
The same with women's names; Mary or Susan. These are for people who are known to you.
Okay?
Now, here at the bottom, this is what you do when you're talking to people who you don't
know. In other words, to strangers. Right? So if you're talking to a man in a formal
situation, you would usually say: "Sir". Okay? "Good morning, sir.", "Excuse me, sir." All
right? "May I help you, sir?" All right? Especially in customer service kind of positions or if
you work in a hotel - these are very important titles to know.
If it's an informal situation... All right? So this is not going to be in a customer service
or... Situation. This might be on the street, or at a party, or something; very informal.
You could say: "Hey, mister." Or: "Hey, man.", "Hey, dude.", "Hey, bro." All right? Again,
informal to very informal.
If you're talking to a woman, we don't really have an informal column for a woman that we
don't know, so it's usually a little bit more on the formal side. If it's informal, you
know the person. All right? So if it's a woman and you don't know her name, you could say:
"Madam. May I help you, madam?" Or: "Excuse me, ma'am." So "ma'am" is kind of like an...
Sort of like an abbreviation of "madam". So, "madam" or "ma'am".
If you're talking to a group of people and they're... Let's say first the group is all
men, and if it's a formal situation, you would say: "Gentlemen". Okay? So you're trying to
get some... The attention of some men, you could say: "Gentlemen. Excuse me, gentlemen."
If it's a group of women, you could say: "Ladies. Good morning, ladies." Okay? If you're talking
and you don't know their name. Okay? Once you get to know them, it's a little bit different.
If you're addressing a crowd and there's going to be men and women there, usually we will
say: "Ladies and gentlemen. Good evening, ladies and gentlemen." And we do put "ladies"
first. Okay? We don't say: "Good evening, gentlemen and ladies." That's just not a common
expression at all. So make sure you say: "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to
the show." Something like that. All right? Very common expressions and very important
expressions, very polite expressions to know.
In... Again, in an informal situation or a very informal situation, you could refer to
a group of people, men and women as: "Folks. Hey, folks. Let's... Let's be quiet now so
she can start." Okay? Very informal. And gets more informal. "Hey, guys. How are you doing?",
"Hey, guys. What are you doing? What are you doing here?" Okay? And if you're talking to
your children, this is in a family situation: "Hey, kids. Let's go now." Okay? So that's
how you're referring to a group of children. All right? You may or may not know them in
that case.
So quite a few things to keep in mind. It seems basic. Make sure you know these basic
things of how to refer to people and it will be a lot easier for you. Okay? If you'd like
to do some practice on this, please go to our website: www.engvid.com. You can also
subscribe to my YouTube channel for more lessons in basic or advanced English. Thanks very
much for watching. Bye for now.
提示:點選文章或是影片下面的字幕單字,可以直接快速翻譯喔!

載入中…

如何稱呼他人 (Speak English: What to call people)

4772 分類 收藏
Laura Hung 發佈於 2014 年 8 月 11 日    Yvonne ,Lin 翻譯    林恩立 審核
看更多推薦影片
  1. 1. 單字查詢

    在字幕上選取單字即可即時查詢單字喔!

  2. 2. 單句重複播放

    可重複聽取一句單句,加強聽力!

  3. 3. 使用快速鍵

    使用影片快速鍵,讓學習更有效率!

  4. 4. 關閉語言字幕

    進階版練習可關閉字幕純聽英文哦!

  5. 5. 內嵌播放器

    可以將英文字幕學習播放器內嵌到部落格等地方喔

  6. 6. 展開播放器

    可隱藏右方全文及字典欄位,觀看影片更舒適!

  1. 英文聽力測驗

    挑戰字幕英文聽力測驗!

  1. 點擊展開筆記本讓你看的更舒服

  1. UrbanDictionary 俚語字典整合查詢。一般字典查詢不到你滿意的解譯,不妨使用「俚語字典」,或許會讓你有滿意的答案喔