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  • [smooth jazz music]

  • [drive buzzes] [PC beeps]

  • - [Clint] Oh yes.

  • Look at that.

  • Greetings, and welcome to another LGR unboxing

  • of something delightfully new old stock.

  • And this right here

  • is something I have never seen before

  • complete in the box like this, still sealed up.

  • This is gonna be really special.

  • This is an IBM ThinkPad 380ED,

  • Model 26356AU,

  • which is a laptop notebook computer introduced in 1997.

  • Sold through 1998 before being withdrawn from the market,

  • but yeah, you can see this one's actually put together

  • on November 17th, 1997.

  • And yeah, it's still in the box after all this time.

  • How in the world did this happen?

  • Well, this is all thanks to the generosity

  • of an LGR patron named Matt Hrushka.

  • He got in touch on the Patreon page for LGR

  • and said, hey, I got this thing,

  • it looks amazing, but I haven't opened it yet.

  • Would you like the honor of opening it up on your channel?

  • And I'm like, [chuckles] are you kidding?

  • But yeah, I'm just going to read over this letter here.

  • "Greetings from Santa Barbara," he says.

  • "I'm a bit of an IBM collector

  • and amazingly came across this one a little bit ago.

  • I had gone back and forth on just storing it untouched

  • or cracking it open and enjoying it.

  • Decided that it's just too good of a find

  • to sit on a shelf," I agree.

  • So he'd like as many people to share

  • in the unboxing as possible,

  • with requests being to leave stickers

  • and film intact if possible,

  • but I can open it up and install some software.

  • And also, "Please install 'Doom' on it."

  • A special copy is included inside.

  • This right here. Look at that registered copy of "Doom."

  • Yeah. Aw yeah, there we go.

  • So this is the mail-ordered registered copy of "Doom."

  • Version 1.666. [chuckles in evil]

  • And I do have a copy of this myself,

  • but awesome to have his on here.

  • So this will be the first thing we're gonna install on here,

  • but of course, I'm also expecting...

  • I mean, just all sorts of cool things,

  • because it's got Windows 95

  • and whatever IBM decided to install on there.

  • Thing is, I don't know if this is actually going to work.

  • Of course, there's only one way to find out:

  • opening it up and plugging it in and turning it on,

  • so we're gonna go ahead and do that in just a second.

  • But I do expect that, you know,

  • maybe the batteries might not be going.

  • There's the CMOS battery and, of course,

  • the laptop battery itself.

  • So who knows? We'll see.

  • If you'd like to go ahead and skip straight to the unboxing,

  • go right here to this timecode in the video.

  • That's when the actual unboxing will start.

  • But real briefly, though,

  • I just wanted to go over the specs of this thing

  • so you know what it is we're getting into.

  • So this this is a printout from IBM's website, October 1998.

  • It had been withdrawn from the market by that point.

  • But yeah, Pentium MMX 166 CPU, fantastic.

  • A CD-ROM and a floppy drive both integrated into the unit.

  • That was one of the big selling points of this.

  • Before that you had to swap them out for the most part.

  • And this version being the 6AU model,

  • it's got a 3-gigabyte hard disk

  • and a 12.1-inch TFT color display.

  • And of course,

  • a NeoMagic MagicGraph 128ZV SVGA accelerator.

  • That should be awesome.

  • And 16 megs of memory installed.

  • Among all the other things on here. So, anyway.

  • And another thing I always try

  • to figure out with these things

  • is what it would've cost brand new,

  • because the fact that it was sitting there...

  • This one, apparently, was just in an office

  • for like 23, 24 years or whatever,

  • unopened, but bought brand new at some point.

  • So how much did they spend to just never use it?

  • Well, here is the original IBM price list

  • I found from the announcement.

  • So this is from 1997.

  • This is this model right here, the 26356AU.

  • $5,199! [laughs]

  • Imagine spending that much

  • and then just never using the thing.

  • Now, this is the original suggested list price

  • from IBM themselves to their business partners.

  • So, of course, the street price was always lower.

  • So this is an article from CNET

  • announcing the same series of 380s, the ED and such.

  • So they talk about the one with the 150 megahertz,

  • 2-gig hard drive, na-na-na, costing $3,899.

  • Of course, this is the ED with a 3-gig drive,

  • so it was definitely more than $3,899.

  • If I had to guess, maybe around $4,000,

  • maybe a little more than that

  • for this particular model brand new.

  • But, of course, the street price.

  • There were always discounts when you got them

  • actually in a store or from an IBM business partner,

  • either in person or ordered.

  • So you can see one here that is this particular one. $3,649.

  • And this was a little bit later.

  • I think this was the end of 1997

  • or the beginning of 1998.

  • I'm gonna say 4,000 bucks is probably what it cost.

  • So yeah, that's enough ogling the cardboard-encased glory.

  • It is just paper, after all, we're looking at,

  • and it's the contents,

  • all the electronical goodness, that counts.

  • So let's go ahead and open this up as carefully as possible

  • and try to keep these things intact.

  • Yeah, let's just unbox a brand-new IBM ThinkPad.

  • [smooth jazz music]

  • [voiceless, respectful unboxing]

  • All right, security seal is broken.

  • And it looks like these cardboard flaps just kinda come out.

  • Ooh.

  • Ooh!

  • Hoo-hoo! [laughs in new old stock]

  • Ah.

  • Ho-ho!

  • It is hard not to just go crazy here.

  • So straight away we get a Quick Setup Guide

  • with that style of artwork IBM was using

  • in the late '90s there.

  • "Quick Setup Guide provides you

  • with information on how to set up your computer quickly."

  • Well gosh, I would hope so.

  • Oh, look at that!

  • Just numbers and pictures.

  • Basically just put the battery in, plug it in, turn it on.

  • Good times.

  • And around back we got some other things here.

  • Yeah, there's the startup thing if there's no OS installed.

  • Hopefully we won't see that.

  • "Operating system screen. You can start computer operation."

  • Look at that. Japanese versions of Windows 3.1 and OS/2.

  • Okay, let me move my camera here

  • so we can get a little better view of this.

  • Oh yes. [laughs]

  • This is really neat to see all of these

  • in their original distribution,

  • instead of just loose.

  • So accessories. Look at these.

  • Got a new lithium-ion battery there.

  • Who knows if that'll still hold a charge?

  • Course, the AC adapter.

  • And a nipple. Oh, a couple nipples, mm.

  • These are worth their weight in gold nowadays.

  • You used to be able to find these so easily.

  • Now, to get this particular style of TrackPoint nub,

  • it can be rather difficult, the rounded ones

  • with the fuzzy, kind of sandpapery texture.

  • Anyway.

  • Like, you can still get 'em.

  • They're just not as easy to find on their own anymore.

  • And here we go. Ooh.

  • A substantial portion of paperwork. Mmm.

  • [chuckles] "PUBG."

  • "PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds" Group?

  • "Tips for using tour IBM ThinkPad comfortably and safely."

  • Uh...

  • Yeah, don't use it inside of a volcano,

  • don't drop it off a cliff, that kinda stuff.

  • And lift this out of the way.

  • Ooh.

  • Yeah!

  • Software, I'm assuming. More documentation.

  • Oh-ho-ho. And the ThinkPad.

  • Ooh, that came right outta there,

  • so that glue has deteriorated.

  • It's kinda nice, actually.

  • I like not having to cut it apart

  • or tear it open or anything.

  • Yeah. Look at all this stuff.

  • Let's see what we got here, man.

  • A little booklet thingy.

  • "International service information."

  • It's just phone numbers

  • for all the IBM places around the world, okay.

  • And got some stickers. "Need Help?"

  • Wow. [laughs] Four of 'em!

  • If you really need help, just stick 'em all over the office.

  • Ooh, a special offer inside.

  • A special offer in the form of registering.

  • Did you get anything for registration? Looks like you did.

  • "For completing and returning the attached thingy,

  • IBM will send you a nameplate

  • you can place in the cover indentation

  • to personalize your IBM computer."

  • Now that's cool. Look at that!

  • A custom nameplate on a ThinkPad?

  • Did anybody do that? Let me know in the comments.

  • Oh man, and all kinds of ads. [laughs] Sure.

  • CompuServe, of course.

  • Premier protection for IBM whatever.

  • Artisoft CoSession Remote?

  • "Access your PC from anywhere at any time."

  • [laughs] AOL 3.0. 50 free hours!

  • Yeah, I remember these diner ads.

  • Ooh. Never seen this exact little brochure/pamphlet thingy.

  • It's a little larger than the ones I got in the mail.

  • And some license agreement stuff.

  • Oh, a bunch more license agreement stuff.

  • Well, yeah. IBM.

  • "Hints and tips for using a PC card," indeed. PCMCIA.

  • Neat.

  • "Read me first." Hmm.

  • "Thanks for purchasing an IBM ThinkPad." You're welcome!

  • I totally purchased this.

  • "The Recovery CD..."

  • Okay, that's awesome too. I'm gonna image that.

  • That can be rather hard to find,

  • some of these ThinkPad recovery things.

  • You find a lot of the drivers and software on their own,

  • but having the original media or even copies of it is...

  • Yeah.

  • What do we got here? "Additional information."

  • CardWorks, CardSoft, CardWizard,

  • a lot of the PC card programs.

  • Cool.

  • "Personal carrying cases for ThinkPad."

  • These are kinda hard to find too.

  • I've been trying to find one for my 380XD.

  • Haven't yet found one. Not the originals, anyway.

  • Look at these things.

  • With the cool leather ThinkPad badge and everything.

  • Here's a full overview, just a list of all of 'em,

  • in case anybody's curious.

  • Looks like the most expensive one

  • is the Executive Leather one, $280 U.S.

  • And now, of course,

  • the star of the show.

  • I mean, it's all the star,

  • but this is like the star among stars.

  • Oh, man. This is crazy. [laughs]

  • Just seeing one of these that hasn't been touched? Ah!

  • They're always in such...

  • Not always, but they're usually in pretty terrible shape

  • because of the materials that they used on the outside.

  • They get all gouged up and scratched up and they fall apart,

  • and it's weird seeing one still in the plastic.

  • The IBM styrofoam.

  • Ooh, what is this? "Important, read before removing."

  • I suppose we will. "Before breaking the seal..."

  • And license stuff. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, well.

  • I accept everything in 1997's agreements.