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  • - What's up everyone?

  • Nelson Dellis here and another episode

  • of Random Memory Tips.

  • And I just wanted to give you guys a little update

  • on how my Drops 2K Challenge Learning Dutch, is going.

  • And it's going well.

  • I've learned about 1,000 words.

  • We're about 30 days in.

  • I've been working on the app every day.

  • I maybe learn about three or four modules a day,

  • which is about 17 words per modules.

  • So 17 times four, 68.

  • Obviously that doesn't add up to 1,000 over 30 days

  • but some of the days I actually spend

  • just reviewing past ones that I've learned already.

  • If some of you have read the book by Seth Godin, The Dip,

  • you know that when you start something new

  • there's always kind of a quick rise

  • in achievement and excitement.

  • And that was me when I started.

  • I was learning words real quick.

  • It was fun.

  • The whole process was novel.

  • And words were sticking.

  • It was very easy to keep track of 200, 300 words.

  • But obviously as I started learning more

  • you kind of get this dip.

  • And this is where most people will quit

  • with any given task,

  • whether it's learning some new skill

  • or trying to stick with a habit for 30 days plus.

  • And so now I'm in that dip.

  • I'm learning more and more words.

  • It's kind of building on each other.

  • It's getting to be pretty heavy

  • in terms of information that I need to hold

  • and I gotta push through

  • to come out on the other end of that dip.

  • So I figure today we'll talk about some examples

  • of words that I've encountered

  • and how I went about memorizing them.

  • I've done a video before

  • about how to memorize foreign words.

  • It's pretty simple.

  • Just come up with a picture for the thing,

  • the foreign word,

  • and come up with a picture for the meaning,

  • smash 'em together.

  • That's what I've been doing.

  • But the beautiful thing about Dutch is

  • that some of these words are actually pretty weird

  • in themselves, which makes them memorable.

  • Some of them are really fun to say

  • and just roll off the tongue

  • which also makes them memorable.

  • Some, literally, translate to some really funny combinations

  • that just make it inherently memorable.

  • So there's actually a lot of help there

  • when it comes to memorizing.

  • So without further ado,

  • let's maybe go through some of my favorite words

  • that I've encountered so far

  • and how I memorized them.

  • (upbeat music)

  • So the first one is this word spin.

  • What does it mean?

  • Spider, so if I put those together

  • all I think of is basically

  • that a spider spins a web.

  • Right, makes sense?

  • So this word was actually pretty easy

  • because it almost means or has part of it's meaning

  • or something that it does

  • applies to the actual word in the definition.

  • So that one's easy, spin spider.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Some of these words come up like this

  • where they just sound pleasing

  • and they're just inherently memorable for that reason

  • and I don't really use a technique.

  • One of those words, in Dutch, is pompoen.

  • Pompoen stands for pumpkin.

  • And so it's pretty close, pumpkin, pompoen.

  • But I've been saying it to my kid

  • over and over again.

  • He loves the sound of it.

  • The pompoen, the pompoen, the pompoen.

  • So it's just kind of drilled itself into my memory.

  • And it just is easy and sounds fun.

  • (upbeat music)

  • This next one is a big word, sinaasappelsap.

  • And what it means is orange juice.

  • So if I put those together

  • I come up with a pretty in depth image,

  • especially for that first word.

  • So sinaasappelsap, I think of a sinus,

  • I think of an apple,

  • I think of tree sap,

  • and that's sinaasappelsap.

  • Sinus, apple, sap.

  • Now I gotta relate that to orange juice somehow.

  • So I kind of make a little story

  • connecting one to the other.

  • So imagine that somebody sneezes

  • because their sinuses are blocked up,

  • out of their nose, their sinus area

  • flies out an apple that kind of transmorphs into sap,

  • like a sappy apple.

  • And it get's caught into an orange juice cup.

  • And maybe by the time it lands in the cup

  • it's a beautiful glass of Tropicana orange juice.

  • So sinus apple sap orange juice.

  • And that's it.

  • That's a really great image in itself.

  • And so when I see sinaasappelsap

  • I can't help but think of the orange juice

  • at the end of the story.

  • And if I see orange juice

  • I can't help think of the reverse.

  • The sap apple sinus, sinaasappelsap.

  • Say that 10 times.

  • Sinaasappelsap, sinus apple.

  • (upbeat music)

  • This is one of my absolute favorites so far

  • is how to say mustache in Dutch and it's snor, S-N-O-R.

  • So I literally just picture

  • a guy with a big mustache snoring.

  • And I try give some action and life to that picture.

  • So I picture the little hairs of his mustache

  • kind of overhanging his mouth,

  • flailing in the wind there as he snores really loudly.

  • Snor, mustache.

  • (upbeat music)

  • So now here's another interesting thing in Dutch

  • is as you learn kind of basic words

  • you get these compound words

  • that mean other words.

  • So one good example is struisvogel

  • which means ostrich.

  • But if you break it into parts, struis and vogel.

  • Vogel is bird, ostrich is a bird.

  • And struis which is stress.

  • So it literally translates to a stressed bird.

  • (upbeat music)

  • That image in itself actually makes an ostrich,

  • it makes sense for an ostrich.

  • But it helps with the pictures.

  • I just picture this stressed out ostrich,

  • sticks it's head in the ground to hide from the stress.

  • That's a case where the actual, literal meaning,

  • even though it doesn't mean ostrich, per se,

  • makes it way more memorable.

  • I can't think of another stressed out bird but an ostrich.

  • (upbeat music)

  • And then you get words that are

  • representing something pretty simple in English.

  • And then you get this God forsaken huge word

  • in the language.

  • In this case, we're talking about ladybug or ladybird,

  • depending on where you're from.

  • And the word is lieveheersbeestje,

  • which is this huge word.

  • I try to break it down into parts

  • but I don't really know all of what those words mean,

  • except maybe beestje,

  • I know that means beast or creature.

  • And so lieveheers, actually translates to lady.

  • But that doesn't matter.

  • Because in terms of my image,

  • I gotta break it down to what it sounds

  • like to me in English.

  • So lieveheer sounds like leave here, right?

  • So I'm leaving something here.

  • And then beestje makes me think of a beast.

  • It actually reads like a beast.

  • So that actually works.

  • So I imagine leaving here.

  • At some point I leave here, a beast,

  • maybe I hype it up that it's some scary beast.

  • And actually it's just this tiny little ladybird, just tiny.

  • So I leave here this beast.

  • And it's kind of ironic, memorable,

  • the fact that it's actually a tiny, little ladybug beast.

  • So that's it guys.

  • Quick update, a few words that give you

  • an insight into how I think about

  • memorizing all these thousands of words

  • that I'm going after.

  • And how you could maybe take a language

  • and learn some quick vocabulary.

  • And I'll be back in about a month

  • with another update

  • with my progress learning Dutch.

  • Thanks for watching, guys.

  • As usual, like, subscribe, all the things.

  • I'm out, da.

  • (snaps fingers)

  • (upbeat music)

- What's up everyone?

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B1 中級 美國腔

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