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  • Whatpleasure. What an amazing TEDx!

  • So imagine you had an opportunity in your life to consider the question of education

  • without looking at all of the restrictions and the complexities

  • that come with introducing education to a country like yours.

  • Imagine you lived in a mythical places like California,

  • where there were no laws about what kind of education you could create.

  • If you could imagine

  • the best possible place for children to learn.

  • If you could imagine the most incredible learning experiences day after day.

  • and if you could imagine starting a school with two questions in your mind -

  • two powerful questions that would shape how you rethought education

  • and those two questions:

  • Where does competence come from?

  • How do people become those kind of people that we admire,

  • who can take on any new challenge,

  • like Ahmed (Coucha)and his TEDxCairo - his little change

  • that was part of that revolution of Arab spring.

  • How do people become like Zuzana (Kierulfova) and her passion about such simple thing like mud

  • that transforms lives and transforms how people think about housing.

  • And the other question is: Are there possibly experiences that children have

  • that predispose them to heroic behavior later in life?

  • Is there something about what happens in childhood that makes you that kind of person?

  • So I started my summer camp with those two questions.

  • And this was my summer camp.

  • I made it for me to answer questions. This was in fact my own private laboratory

  • where I could experiment on other people's children.

  • And because it was my camp we built stuff.

  • This is what I do when I have time for my self

  • and this was a passion I could share with children, in this context.

  • We built a roller coaster with 20 meters, no 30 meters of track.

  • We built incredible cars that you power by rowing.

  • And as we were doing this

  • we started to have some fundamental realizations about how children learn.

  • And one of them, it seems so obvious, but it's almost gone from education - from traditional education.

  • And I'll tell you now and when you see it you'll remember how obvious this is.

  • We think with our hands.

  • It's true. 30% of our brains is dedicated to processing information from our hands.

  • Just like those cockroaches we sense the world through these and we make sense of the world through these.

  • Ideas that we form in our heads we often metaphorically shape with our hands.

  • We see the same parts of our brain light up.

  • And in fact, if you pick something up, you probably have something in your hand right now that you can use,

  • I want you to turn to the person next to you and poke them with it. Go on!

  • OK. Put that object down and poke them with your finger.

  • OK. If we had you in one of those giant machines with the magnetic doughnut

  • and we were looking at the activity in your brain, the exact same parts of the brain would light up

  • whether I poke you with the thing or I poke you with my finger.

  • And that's because our brains are wired for tools

  • - for things that we put in our hands.

  • When I put this in my hand

  • my brain reshapes

  • to include the end of this thing as part of my body

  • and it doesn't matter if this is a few centimeters long,

  • if it's aápencil,

  • or it's two meters long.

  • If I poke someone with a two meter stick my body is extended -

  • the model I have in the my brain of my very own body - is extended to the end of that stick.

  • You should let your children play with sticks. Itĺs good for the brain.

  • Such a simple idea and yet in classrooms

  • we ask children to sit in desks and use the exact same tools hour after hour after hour,

  • never getting a chance to expand their brains with the use of different tools.

  • We have built some amazing stuff at Tinkering School.

  • When you give childrenchance to

  • both come up with an idea, build it and test it in the real world

  • - to make a boat that might sink,

  • not just their minds but their hearts are involved in that project.

  • They are passionate about the result.

  • So we discovered a new idea:

  • Create a meaningful experience and the learning will follow!

  • What that means is that if you focus first, before you even think about curriculum,

  • before you worry about math, reading, writing

  • if you focus on designing the experience the rest of it you get for free.

  • So what would a school be like

  • if it came from a place where children could build airplanes and fly them?

  • My little summer camp became famous

  • and I got to speak on the main stage at TED.

  • This was a transformative moment for me.

  • My little camp which I ran at my house

  • became world famous.

  • I got invited to speak to educators around the world about this little idea.

  • And s I spoke to them I realized there were parts missing from my idea.

  • It couldn't beschool. I had some good parts and I had some bad parts.

  • And working with these educators in places literally as far away as Bahrain

  • and as close to home as San Francisco - my nearest city -

  • these incredible people shared these ideas and we put together something

  • that made sense.

  • And I want you to know I'm not an educator by training. I come from the world of computer technology.

  • used to manage and innovation group at Adobe,

  • which was a great job and I left it for this.

  • So I'm the guy who teaches children

  • how to make perfectly round balls of sand.

  • And now I'm going to make them out of mud.

  • But this idea that we started to frame with these educators

  • was big and complicated.

  • And in order to understand it I had to draw it,

  • because that's how I think and Iĺm gonna draw it for you right now.

  • So, if the standard traditional pedagogical unit of a traditional school

  • is that day divided into these forty five minute periods -

  • a little bit of math, a little bit of science, a little bit of history, a little bitlunch,

  • a little bit of physical education, ...

  • If that's how we think of children's education now

  • I want you to consider a new pedagogical unit.

  • We call it the Arc.

  • Every Arc hastheme -

  • a guiding idea which shapes

  • how we create the education for the children.

  • For this example Iĺm going to use wind.

  • Wind - such a common element of our lives,

  • but if we look at it closely, there's so much that we can explore

  • and that's what we do.

  • We call this first phase of the Arc EXPLORATION.

  • and in this phase we createlandscape for the children to explore

  • and we populate this landscape with ideas about wind

  • that are represented by actual people and things.

  • Learning should be tangible.

  • So we invite somebody in who generates power using wind. You guys do a lot of that here.

  • We invite somebody who uses wind to transport goods around the world or studied how that happened.

  • We bring in artists who work with wind to create sculptures.

  • We bring scientists in who study the meteorological sources of wind and the effects of wind.

  • And through this landscape we take the children onjourney.

  • They meet these people, they work with these ideas, they see the actual thing in real life.

  • We leave the school all the time.

  • The children become inspired by these ideas and we capture that inspiration.

  • They work with a collaborator - an adult what you would callteacher - to createdeclaration.

  • This declaration is the transition from our EXPLORATION phase into a new phase.

  • Each of these declarations isclear statement

  • about what they intend to build, or do, or practice, or learn about in this next phase.

  • We call this phase EXPRESSION.

  • This is not just about building.

  • It could be theater, it could be singing, it could be writing, it could be anything,

  • but we want them to express some new understanding about wind.

  • A design build practice to createnew kind of a windmill.

  • The exploration ofhypothesis about the effect of wind in a certain environment - a micro climate.

  • A series of practicing of writing and performing songs and building a stage ends in a performance

  • that the kids have created about wind.

  • That performance happens in the last Arc... I mean the last phase of our Arc.

  • We call it EXPOSITION - a chance to show the world their understanding of wind.

  • We open the doors of the school and strangers flood in.

  • They come from other schools, they are friends of the experts that we've been working with,

  • they are friends of the parents and they are the parents themselves

  • and we put onshow.

  • We have a science museum of wind. We havepoetry museum of wind.

  • And then all of that notes and progress and the daily reflections get compiled together to create -

  • in a moment of reflection -

  • portfolio.

  • A clear description of what they learned in this project, the decisions that they made and the kinds of things they tried.

  • This portfolio,over the course of their lives at my school,

  • begins to accumulate projects and when they graduate, if they started with us in kindergarten,

  • they'll have done 60 projects taken from that moment of inspiration all the way to completion.

  • We give this back to them when they walk out the door and they take that right touniversity.

  • We've contacted some of the highest universities in the United States,

  • explained how our school works and they say: Yes!

  • We will take those people who know how to get things done,

  • how of work with their own ideas.

  • So you're asking yourself: What does a school like this really look like?

  • Let's have a peak at Brightworks.

  • Last night I collected images that were put on our blog for Wednesday.

  • This is a peek into our school three days ago.

  • We're in the end of an EXPRESSION phase.

  • Here's Alexander, cutting a piece of steel to be the axle of a seven person

  • peddle powered camper where that children will sleep

  • and drive the camper themselves on a three day camping trip next week.

  • Here's his brother Daniel working with one of the experts in bicycle design who has come in to share his time with children.

  • Twenty hours over the course of this EXPLORATION I mean EXPRESSION phrase.

  • Here's their teammate Zada working to shape and take the sharp edges off that piece of steel.

  • Zada is ten years old.

  • Here are the youngest children of our school - 6 and 7 years old working on creating eggs - paper machete eggs -

  • for a play that they're doing about the life cycle of birds.

  • Lola and Bruno.

  • Here are the kids going to lunch. They've decided to bring the chickens

  • that the youngest children hatched as part of their exploration of the life cycle of birds.

  • Theyĺre taking them to the park because the chickens don't get enough outdoor time.

  • Here are ten, eleven -

  • sorry nine, ten and eleven year olds

  • rehearsing a play that they've been working on now for two weeks.

  • In order to do the play, because there are special effects involved, they had to create their own theater.

  • This is a 400 pound stage it took the entire school to lower to the ground.

  • Having put it down they had to immediately test it.

  • Occasionally,

  • when you look at your own pedagogy, you have to know when to put it aside.

  • So we have this phrase we use sometimes in our school:

  • ôScrew the Arc, make the cheese

  • We invented this because a few weeks ago we had an opportunity to work with the world-famous cheese maker.

  • It didn't fit into our Arc,

  • which was around the topic of locomotion - energy applied to move insingle direction.

  • What does that have to do with cheese?

  • Absolutely nothing!

  • But you cannot say no when you have an opportunity to meet with someone

  • who can explain to children the history of cheese in four hours and

  • in doing so make cheese with children.

  • Similarly, when it became apparent that the little eggs were starting to hatch,

  • for those chickens that we were taking to the park,

  • the children demanded and organized an overnight vigil to watch those eggs hatch.

  • For the first time in our history almost all of the student body slept in the school.

  • The next day - aácelebration, and one baby chick.

  • Educators come from around the world to visit our school. This is Steve Davee

  • from the world-famous Opal School in Portland in the North America.

  • Climbing on a structure built by twelve year olds

  • who had just recently raised these giant tree trunks up against the wall

  • and then screened two-by-fours to them to create a bike rack.

  • The bike rack never came into existence - it was too much fun to climb.

  • We treat the city as an extension of our school.

  • Using bicycles and buses we are trying to get the children to see the world as a place of learning.

  • This is our school and this is our dream. We make a lot of mistakes.

  • We are constantly making mistakes and so are the children.

  • Working with the collaborators we are creating our school together.

  • It is amazing, it is frustrating and it is the most rewarding work I've ever done.

  • Thank you very much.

Whatpleasure. What an amazing TEDx!

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【TEDx】TEDxBratislava--Gever TULLEY--參與式學習的祕密。 (【TEDx】TEDxBratislava - Gever TULLEY - Secrets of engagement-based learning)

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    Hhart Budha 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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