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  • Hello. This is 6 Minute English with me, Neil.

  • And me, Sam.

  • Today, we're talking rubbish.

  • Ooh, that's a bit harsh – I thought it

  • was going to be interesting.

  • I mean our topic is about rubbish, not that

  • we are rubbish.

  • I see. Do go on.

  • Thank you. So the amount of waste we produce

  • around the world is huge and it's a

  • growing problem.

  • But, there are some things that we can do,

  • like recycling. Where I live, I can recycle

  • a lot, and I'm always very careful to separate

  • - to split my rubbish into paper, metal,

  • food, plastic and so on.

  • But is that enough, even if we all do it?

  • We'll look a little more at this topic shortly,

  • but first, as always, a question. Which

  • country recycles the highest percentage

  • of its waste? Is it:

  • A: Sweden, B: Germany, or C: New Zealand

  • What do you think, Sam?

  • I'm not sure, but I think it could be Germany

  • so I'm going to go with that - Germany.

  • OK. We'll see if you're right a little

  • later on. The BBC radio programme,

  • Business Daily, recently tackled this topic.

  • They spoke to Alexandre Lemille, an

  • expert in this area. Does he think

  • recycling is the answer? Let's

  • hear what he said.

  • Recycling is not the answer to waste from

  • an efficient point of view because we are

  • not able to get all the waste separated

  • properly and therefore treated in the

  • background. The main objective of our

  • model is to hide waste

  • so we don't see as urban citizens, or rural

  • citizens, we don't see the waste, it is

  • out of sight and therefore out of mind.

  • What's his view of recycling?

  • I was a bit surprised, because he said

  • recycling wasn't the answer. One reason

  • is that it's not always possible to separate

  • waste you can recycle from waste you

  • can't recycle, and that makes treating it

  • very difficult.

  • 'Treating' means handling it and using

  • different processes, so it can be used again.

  • And the result is a lot of waste, including

  • waste that could be recycled but which is

  • just hidden. And as long as we don't see

  • it, we don't think about it.

  • And he uses a good phrase to describe

  • thisout of sight, out of mind. And that's

  • true, at least for me. My rubbish and

  • recycling is collected and I don't really

  • think about what happens to it after that.

  • Is as much of it recycled as I think, or is it

  • buried, burned or even sent to other

  • countries? It's not in front of my house, so

  • I don't really think about itout of sight,

  • out of mind.

  • Let's listen again

  • Recycling is not the answer to waste from

  • an efficient point of view because we are

  • not able to get all the waste separated

  • properly and therefore treated in the

  • background. The main objective of our

  • model is to hide waste so we don't see as

  • urban citizens, or rural citizens, we don't

  • see the waste, it is out of sight and

  • therefore out of mind.

  • One possible solution to this problem is

  • to develop what is called a circular economy.

  • Here's the presenter of Business Daily,

  • Manuela Saragosa, explaining what that means.

  • The idea then at the core of a circular

  • economic and business model is that a

  • product, like say a washing machine or

  • even a broom, can always be returned to

  • the manufacturer to be reused or repaired

  • before then sold on again. The point is

  • the manufacturer retains responsibility for

  • the lifecycle of the product

  • it produces rather than the consumer

  • assuming that responsibility when he or

  • she buys it.

  • So it seems like a simple ideathough

  • maybe very difficult to do.

  • Yes, the idea is that the company that

  • makes a product, the manufacturer, is

  • responsible for the product, not the

  • person who bought it, the consumer.

  • So, if the product breaks or reaches the

  • end of its useful life, its lifecycle, then the

  • manufacturer has to take it back and fix,

  • refurbish or have it recycled.

  • I guess this would make manufacturers

  • try to make their products last longer!

  • It certainly would. Let's listen again.

  • The idea then at the core of a circular

  • economic and business model is that a

  • product, like say a washing machine or

  • even a broom, can always be returned to

  • the manufacturer to be reused or repaired

  • before then sold on again. The point is

  • the manufacturer retains responsibility for

  • the lifecycle of the product it produces

  • rather than the consumer assuming

  • that responsibility when he or she buys it.

  • That's just about all we have time for in

  • this programme. Before we recycle the

  • vocabulary

  • Oh very good Neil!

  • Before we - thank you Sam - before we recycle

  • the vocabulary, we need to get the answer

  • to today's question. Which country recycles

  • the highest percentage of its waste? Is it:

  • A: Sweden, B: Germany or C: New Zealand

  • Sam, what did you say?

  • I think it's Germany.

  • Well I would like to offer you congratulations

  • because Germany is the correct answer.

  • Now let's go over the vocabulary.

  • Of course. 'To separate' means to divide or

  • split different things, for example,

  • separate your plastic from your paper for

  • recycling.

  • 'Treating' is the word for dealing with, for

  • example, recycled waste.

  • The phrase 'out of sight, out of mind',

  • means ignoring something or a situation

  • you can't see.

  • A 'manufacturer' is the person or company

  • that makes something and the consumer

  • is the person who buys that thing.

  • And the length of time you can expect a

  • product to work for is known as its 'lifecycle'.

  • Well the lifecycle of this programme is 6

  • minutes, and as we are there, or thereabouts,

  • it's time for us to head off. Thanks for

  • your company and hope you can join us

  • again soon. Until then, there is plenty

  • more to enjoy from BBC Learning English

  • online, on social media and on our app.

  • Bye for now.

  • Bye!

Hello. This is 6 Minute English with me, Neil.

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A2 初級

The circular economy: 6 Minute English

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2020 年 11 月 17 日
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