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  • [singing] Whenever, wherever, you and I were meant to be together...

  • Hi, James from www.engvid.com . "My Hips Don't Lie" was Shakira.

  • But anyway, it's an interesting point because Shakira in a song sings a song where "whenever,

  • wherever", and I want to teach you what whenever, wherever, whoever, however actually means.

  • Let's go the board and find out.

  • You'll see Mr. E here is saying "Who, why, how, what, when?".

  • A lot of times in English, if you go to an English school, they'll talk about the W5

  • questions, which are the W words: who, when, where, why... we'll just stop at four, because

  • I don't want to give away something, because there's which and other ones, there's more

  • than W5, but basically these ones.

  • Oh sorry, what.

  • We can do that one, I think it's here.

  • So, what.

  • These five are used for questions, to ask questions.

  • Who is this person, what did you do, why did you do it, where did you go?

  • W5, okay?

  • Reporter questions.

  • Now, there's a mutant - a mutant variation of the "who, why, when, where, what".

  • And what is this variation?

  • Mutant means different from the original.

  • It's changed its form.

  • If the - ever part.

  • I've got "ever" here, question "ever".

  • So, let me just put it in red so you can see it.

  • Question "ever", so whoever, whyever, whenever, however.

  • I said "how", but we'll get to that later, and I'm going to explain how "ever" changes

  • the basic meaning of these W5 questions and how we use them in English and how you can

  • use them.

  • So, let's start off with "wherever".

  • Well, Shakira started off with "whenever", but I'm just going to switch it.

  • Wherever.

  • So, we know "where" means place.

  • Simple enough.

  • But when we say "wherever", it means no particular place.

  • It means there's no special place or nothing I have specifically in my mind where I want

  • to go, alright?

  • So, you can say to somebody "We can eat wherever you want."

  • I don't care about the place.

  • There's no particular place, right?

  • Or, "Where do you want me to put this?"

  • "I don't know, wherever".

  • It's not important.

  • So, the "ever" here changes it to meaning no restriction.

  • There's no limit to where it is, okay?

  • Or - yeah, there's no limit, there's no restriction, we're open.

  • We can also use it as a conjunction, so we're saying it as a conjunction, joining two ideas

  • about possible - leaving some room.

  • So, wherever it's possible, leave some room.

  • Conjunction.

  • Next one I want to talk about is "whoever".

  • Whoever.

  • Now, who is about persons or peoples, right?

  • Person/people.

  • But when we talk about whoever, we're talking about any person, so there's no limitation

  • to the person, I don't know who you are.

  • Example here would be "Whoever was responsible for the..." action, or whoever was responsible

  • for the accident.

  • In this case, I don't know who the person is, so I'm saying any person who did it.

  • Okay, I'm not pointing particularly, I don't know.

  • And we go back to the idea of restriction, there's no restriction, I'm not saying this

  • group of people or this group of people of this person over here, I mean, I don't know

  • so it can be any person.

  • I'm not restricting it to a certain number, okay?

  • Now, when I said "whoever" in brackets, I said "whomever" because in English we have

  • "who" which is the subject, and we have "whom" which is the object and yes, when you say

  • "whoever", you can say "whomever", okay, to whomever this letter is addressed.

  • In that case, the object, the person I'm speaking to.

  • Usually, we say "whom", but once again, it could lead to non-restriction or no limitation.

  • We're cool?

  • A lot of information.

  • Whoever's listening out there, I feel for you!

  • Whoever's listening out there, wherever you are, I know this is difficult, okay, see,

  • I don't know where you are and it's anybody.

  • Next, it also can be used as a pronoun.

  • Yes, you can see it's a pronoun here, but I'm saying to you that you can use it as a

  • pronoun as a sentence like "Whoever would do such a bad thing?".

  • In this case, this is the person, this is the person speaking about it, instead of he

  • or she or it, we're just saying whoever would do such a bad thing, alright?

  • So, you can use it for pronoun use.

  • "Whyever".

  • Whyever is for reason.

  • What is the reason you did this?

  • Now, here's the interesting thing about whyever: most North Americans probably have said this,

  • but they'll tell you I've never written it on paper.

  • I will be one of the first ones to tell you I've never written it on paper.

  • In fact, the first time I wrote it down on paper was for this lesson for you, and whyever

  • I did it, I don't know at this moment.

  • Whoever asked me the question was the one responsible, and I will find them, wherever

  • they are.

  • Okay?

  • So, I'm trying to play with you to build up on our knowledge.

  • But it's - what was the reason for doing it, like "Whyever would you do this?"

  • And it's actually kind of formal, because we usually just say "Why would you do it?"

  • But whyever, we're going back to this whole theme about restriction and opens it up, makes

  • it bigger, gives it a bigger field to play in, so to speak, alright?

  • And you might notice I put here for emphasis for the reason why, so we know it's why and

  • why is the reason, but it makes it stronger, giving it emphasis.

  • So, whyever would you ask me that?

  • You could say "Why would you ask me that?"

  • But you're going to hear people say "Whyever would you ask me that?", making it much stronger

  • and much more personal.

  • So, more, you might say, more offense.

  • Whyever would you do something like that?

  • For what reason could you possibly think of, you know, that would make any sense in this

  • situation?

  • Now, remember, Shakira, whenever, wherever?

  • Now, we're going to when.

  • When is for what?

  • Time.

  • So, when we want to talk about no restriction - I keep saying that word because that's what

  • the "ever" part does.

  • It opens it up to, you know, being unlimited in a way, right?

  • So, when I say no particular time, here's an example.

  • I could say - you could say "Hey James, you're having a party tonight.

  • When should I come?"

  • I go "Oh, I don't know, whenever you want to come.

  • Come over whenever you want."

  • There's no restriction, there's no particular time that I care about, it's open for you.

  • No restriction.

  • The second thing we can talk about is anytime something is repeated, a repeated action.

  • So, you could say to somebody "Whenever" - okay - "Whenever I eat a burrito, I get stomach

  • problems."

  • It means anytime I eat it, and it's repeated, because it must mean more than one time, right?

  • So in this case, it's not no particular time, I'm saying anytime, anytime - anytime, anytime,

  • anytime I can say it many times - as an action is repeated, maybe not regularly, but in any

  • occasion that it occurs, or whenever this thing does happen in time, maybe once a week,

  • once a month, once every three years, I just know it's repeated, I'm saying anytime this

  • repeated action occurs, something else might happen.

  • So, whenever you are late, people get unhappy, right?

  • It means every time you repeat that action at any time.

  • Cool?

  • Alright.

  • Now, here's my favorite one: whatever.

  • What is for things usually, when we speak in English grammar we say what is for things,

  • who is for people, like "What is that?".

  • You cannot say to somebody - oh, please don't ever say to somebody "What is that?" because

  • they will punch you in the face, okay?

  • Because what is a human being, not a piece of poopoo, okay?

  • So, you can't say "What is that?"

  • talking to people, you can only say it about things.

  • So, whatever is a thing or caring and I put caring - you'll see why in a second or two.

  • What is a determiner?

  • Some of you are going "determiner, what is that?".

  • A determiner tells us what we're talking about, so you can say "this, that, and the".

  • These are determinator - determiners.

  • I think I've been watching too much Schwarzenegger.

  • "I am the Determinator, and I'm going to determine your future with a gunshot."

  • Sorry.

  • So, determiner tells us what we're talking about.

  • So, if you said, for instance, "Whatever you did worked.", I'm saying this thing here,

  • I'm talking about this like "the thing, this thing, that thing", it worked.

  • And this determines or shows me what I'm talking about.

  • So, whatever you used on the wall worked.

  • I'm talking about this product.

  • I could say "This thing worked, that thing worked", but I'm saying whatever it is, I

  • don't know what it is, alright, it's a thing, and there's no restriction on the thing, but

  • it worked.

  • Determiner to tell me what it is.

  • Not caring.

  • I was very lazy and I put "whateva".

  • Ladies and gentlemen, sometimes you have, in a relationship, one partner who doesn't

  • care and you'll say something like "Hey baby, I'm sorry - hey baby, gonna give you the news.

  • I'm very sorry baby, I'm late."

  • And she goes "Ah whatever, I don't care."

  • So, when someone says "Whatever", or your boss goes - you go "Boss, I didn't get the

  • project..."

  • "Whatever, Johnson!", it means it's not important, I don't care.

  • Sometimes, you'll see people put - by the way, please don't put this, I wrote it as

  • a joke, okay, because people say it like that, they go "whateva, whateva", they also say

  • "whatevs", "whatevs", it means "Whatever, I don't care".

  • But you can use whatever, finally, as emphasis.

  • "Whatever you do, don't touch that button!"

  • It means, remember the non-restriction part we talked about, you can do anything you want,

  • but don't do that.

  • Whatever you do, don't touch his hair.

  • You'll go crazy.

  • You can touch his nose, his mouth, his lips, his ears, don't touch his hair, alright?

  • Anyway.

  • I do have limits because we have time restriction, so I need to go to the next board and give

  • you a little quiz on what, when, where, how, and I said how because that's going to be

  • on our bonus section.

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go!

  • And we're back!

  • So, I'm going to do our little quiz and then we will do our bonus section because I did

  • say this was the W5 lesson in which we ask questions, but there are a couple other words

  • we use for questions that I will address or look at in a second or two.

  • So, let's go to the board and look at our exercise today is choose the right word.

  • You learned whoever, whenever, whatever, however, whyever, now we're going to see where they

  • may fit in this little quiz of ours.

  • Start with the first one: ___________ flushed the toilet left a floater, and I had to flush

  • it again.

  • That's a difficult one, alright?

  • Something flushed a toilet, left a floater, and I had to flush it again.

  • Hmm.

  • Okay.

  • Next one: You can choose ___________ food you want for the party.

  • You can choose ____________ food you want for the party.

  • Number three: You can come over ___________ you want.

  • I will be home all night.

  • You can come over __________ you want, I will be home all night.

  • And: I don't care.

  • Do ___________ you want to do!

  • I don't care.

  • Do ___________ you want to do!

  • And finally: ____________ it was done, it wasn't done correctly.

  • ____________ it was done, it wasn't done correctly.

  • Now, I've read these to you because some of you, I know, are really good and bright and

  • smart and already you're trying to figure it out, and doing so, I'm giving time for

  • the other people to, you know, take some time, think about, or go back over the video which

  • ones we did and which ones might go over here or work the best, okay?

  • So, I'm going to help with some of them, because some of them will have key words that help

  • you identify what you should use.

  • Some are from the lesson I taught you and I used some key words, right?

  • And other ones - so I've given you three that will help you, the rest we'll have to work

  • on, and even here I've helped you, but you have to figure out what it is, because what's

  • missing?

  • Something is missing from here.

  • That goes with here.

  • So, you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • _________ flushed the toilet, left a floater.

  • Well, first of all, what is a floater?

  • If you don't know what a floater is, the sentence won't make sense.

  • So, let's go flush, toilet, floater.

  • Flushing the toilet is when you go to the washroom and if you're a lady you might sit

  • down, gentlemen you'll sit down and sometimes you pee, guys, you know, you pee, right?

  • And sometimes you do what we call number 2, you sit down and [poof, plop].

  • Well, sometimes the poo that you drop, it doesn't go down, it actually floats.

  • It stays in the top of the water like "Help, I need help, I'm in a big bath of water, help,

  • I'm floating!"

  • So, sorry, a floater is a poo that doesn't go down, it stays on the top.

  • And let's be honest, we've all had occasions when you flush the toilet and you know, you

  • walk out and you turn around, you lift up the lid and there's one piece going "Hahaha,

  • you didn't get me, haha, I'm still here!" and you have to flush again.

  • The one staying there is called the floater.

  • So, if we look here, because I know I went a long way from this but I'm coming back,

  • flushed the toilet, so flushing the toilet is the action of pulling or pressing a button

  • so the water goes down, that's called flushing.

  • Flushing a floater.

  • Now, the floater can't do anything.

  • So, we're missing a pronoun.