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  • Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo.

  • Damn it!

  • E, where's the lights?

  • Oh, God.

  • Oh: "Thank you Aputure.

  • It was dark, you brought the light"?

  • Oh, yeah.

  • Before I get started, E's correct, we actually...

  • We...

  • Our lights weren't working and they went out, and I'm actually doing...

  • I don't do this often.

  • Okay?

  • But I want to give a shout out to Aputure because they brought us lights.

  • Let there be lights.

  • Our lights were actually failing, and Aputure kindly... and this is really cool.

  • They actually asked if they could help us out.

  • They actually gave us...

  • Yeah, they gave us some free lights.

  • They said: "Would you like lights?"

  • Here's the funny thing, straight up: They didn't know we needed lights.

  • Ours were starting to go.

  • Maybe they were watching a video or something.

  • They offered free lights to us, and we took them, and they've been working beautifully.

  • So, in any of the videos you've seen and you liked with Ronnie, myself, or Jade, or anyone

  • - these are the ones we're using.

  • Anyway, done with that because I'm not doing an infomercial for anybody.

  • I'm a free man!

  • But you got to give it out.

  • So, and yeah, if any other company, if you...

  • If you're ever interested in helping out, feel free to do so.

  • Okay?

  • So I'm not a pitch man, so I'm going to move on, but thanks Aputure.

  • E, thank you.

  • Now, moving on because I want to talk about time.

  • And I brought with the...

  • Aputure with this particular video because in Canada we have what's called Daylight Savings

  • Time, and the time shifts.

  • And I want to give you some idioms on time, and you know, it's me, it's James, so I'm

  • not going to give you just idioms; I have a plan.

  • So, in this case, we're going to go around the clock; and as we go around the clock,

  • I'm going to give you an idiom for each hour.

  • And what I mean by that is: Each hour has a number.

  • Right?

  • There's 1 o'clock, 2 o'clock, 3 o'clock, 4 o'clock, 5 - and I'm going to give you an

  • idiom that will go with, like, the number 1, for instance, like: "Once in a lifetime."

  • Right?

  • Number 1, and then you have: "Once in a lifetime", so you remember: "Ah, it happens once."

  • And let's go to the board.

  • Are you ready?

  • All right.

  • So, I'm going to start at...

  • Where should I start?

  • Where should I start?

  • Number 1; first one: "Once in a blue moon".

  • True fact: Blue moons happen every two to three years.

  • A blue moon will happen every two to three years because it happens rarely; it's not

  • very often.

  • If you think about that, if it's every two to three years, that's every 40...

  • 24 to 36 months - that is not very often that it happens.

  • But in the year 2018, it's happening every two to three months; it's a rarity that almost

  • never happens, so that's even bigger being rare.

  • Yes, I researched it because I read.

  • You should, too.

  • All right?

  • So we're...

  • That's what's happening in 2018 in case you ever see this 20 years later, and go: "Liar!

  • It's every two to three years."

  • I told you it was rare; go check it out.

  • So that means it rarely happens.

  • Hour number 2: "Two shakes of a lamb's tail."

  • Maa-maa.

  • This is an oldie, but a goodie.

  • Old people who speak English will know what it is; some younger punks - yeah, you punks,

  • you don't know what it means.

  • A lamb has a little tail and it moves quickly.

  • So...

  • Maybe that's a goat.

  • I think I'm doing a goat.

  • I don't know.

  • But it means very quickly because a lamb's tail is very quick, so it flicks very quickly.

  • All right?

  • So: "Two shakes of a lamb's tail" meaning I will do it quickly or it will be done quickly.

  • Ah, I forgot something here.

  • I'm going to use my brown marker because that means I've done something bad.

  • There's another word for "bad", it starts with "s", but I'm not going to go there.

  • Okay: "3rd time's the charm".

  • "3rd time's the charm" means you've tried something one time, it didn't work; the second

  • time it didn't work; but we're saying lucky number three - if you try it the third time,

  • then it works.

  • "Charm" means luck.

  • If you're charmed, you've got luck.

  • Okay?

  • So: "A 3rd time the char-... 3rd time's the charm" is: The third time it will work.

  • Cool?

  • So, we're at number 4.

  • Yes, I know you can read; you're very smart individuals.

  • Okay?

  • You notice I put "40", okay?

  • And they're going: "James, that's the number 4.

  • There's no 40 on a clock.

  • Not even in military time."

  • I know.

  • But when we speak in English, we don't say: "40", we usually say "4T".

  • See?

  • I tricked you, there.

  • Just a play on words: "4T".

  • Okay?

  • But it's: "40 winks".

  • What do you mean by "40 winks"?

  • Well, a wink is like this.

  • Okay?

  • 40 of them will happen like: One, two, three, four...

  • You get the drift.

  • It's going to take about maybe two or three minutes.

  • But when we say: "40 winks.

  • Catch 40 winks", it means to take a nap.

  • If I'm going to catch 40 winks, that means I'm going to close my eyes for a short time

  • because a wink is short, and I will take a nap; a short sleep.

  • Because when you wink, you close the eye.

  • Okay?

  • All right.

  • So, number 4: "Take 40 winks."

  • It's my play on "4T" sounds-right?-for 4.

  • What about: "Take 5"?

  • If you're...

  • Okay, there was a...

  • There was a...

  • There was a boy band named "Take 5", I think, or there was a group called "Take 5".

  • I'm not talking about them.

  • They took 5 forever.

  • [Laughs] Sorry, bad joke.

  • It means take a break.

  • Yeah, I know, some of you were like: "Bad.

  • Bad."

  • It was bad.

  • But if you take 5...

  • If your boss says: "Okay, take 5", it means: "Take a break.

  • You've been working hard, you need a break.

  • Take 5."

  • Similar to "40 winks", but with 40 winks you're sleeping; "take 5" means take a 5-minute break

  • and come back.

  • Take 5 minutes.

  • Okay?

  • Take a 5-minute break.

  • How about 6?

  • I'm embarrassed to say I didn't find one for 6, so I made one up.

  • But you're doing time.

  • Okay?

  • I got: "Do time", because "do time" is usually a long stretch of time.

  • In this case, it means go to jail.

  • If you have a friend who says: "Oh, I mean, between 2008 and 2018 I was doing time", that

  • explains why you haven't seen them around.

  • They were in jail, son.

  • They were locked up; locked down, doing time.

  • So, when you hear someone say: "I'm doing time"...

  • [Laughs] I've got a bad joke, but I'm not going to say it.

  • It has to do with bending over and soap.

  • Fill in the blanks.

  • Okay: "7-year itch", kind of similar to the last joke I told.

  • "7-year itch" is a time of infidelity.

  • Infidelity.

  • What do you mean?

  • Well, an itch is a scratch; but this is an itch you just can't reach, you're like: "I

  • can't get it."

  • It means when somebody has been married, be it male or female, because I'm an equal opportunity

  • employer.

  • I am.

  • I'm the greatest employer you've ever seen before.

  • True.

  • "Infidelity", it means that one of the partners, one or both decide that they are married but

  • they want to try something new, maybe a second partner.

  • They want to have sex outside of the marriage.

  • For some reason people said it happens after 7 years.

  • All right?

  • So: "The 7-year itch".

  • Now, let's move to: "8-hour day".

  • In North America, that's called a standard working day.

  • If I work 8 hours, I got a standard 8-hour day.

  • That's my standard working hours, and usually it's from 9 to 5.

  • Some people say it's a 9 to 5 job, meaning 8 hours in between.

  • Funny, true story again: I had a Mexican student and his name is Mano.

  • Mano, Mano.

  • Emmanuel.

  • Mano, love you.

  • We were doing this lesson and he turned around, and he was talking about an English week.

  • And he knew I was from England, and he goes: "So, do you guys have an English week?"

  • And I went: "English week?

  • I don't understand."

  • And he looks at me and goes: "You know, an English week, you know, because, you know,

  • you only work Monday to Friday, 9 to 5."

  • And I was like: "Am I supposed to be insulted?"

  • Because he explained in Mexico they work, like, anywhere from six to seven days a week;

  • they work constantly.

  • So this English week was our lazy way of working only eight hours a day, five days a week.

  • I went: "I feel insulted, Mano."

  • He goes: "No, no, you just English.

  • [Laughs]".

  • Anyways, love you.

  • Hope you see this video; I'll have to tell you're on it.

  • Anyway, next: 9.

  • This is going to be interesting.

  • It's another oldie, but goodie.

  • People do know what it means, but we don't say it all the time.

  • But: "A stitch in 9"...

  • Okay.

  • "A stitch in time saves 9."

  • You're probably going to say: "What is a 'stitch'?"

  • Well, let's break it down.

  • When you're sewing-okay?-and you have something, you do stitches.

  • These are stitches.

  • You go in, you go out.

  • Right?

  • In and out.

  • If you do a stitch at the wrong time or you miss a space, then you have to do, like, 9

  • stitches to make it work again.

  • But if you do a stitch at the right place, then you save having to do this.

  • So: "A stitch in time" means if you do it at the right time, you do the right job, you

  • don't have to redo that job again.

  • All right?

  • Now I'm on number 10.

  • I know, I don't have another one.

  • You're going: "I was told I would get 10 idioms"...

  • No, sorry.

  • "12 idioms matching up with a clock.

  • This is not a clock."

  • Right?

  • "This is, like, a half-eaten pizza."

  • Sorry, dudes.

  • You get what you pay for; it's free - remember that.

  • But these all work and they all talk about time periods, right?

  • So, if we say: "Like clockwork", it means something happens...

  • Tick, tick, tick; tick, tick, tick, tick; tick, tick, tick, tick; tick, tick, tick,

  • tick"...

  • It happens regularly and usually at the same time.

  • If the bus comes at 10 o'clock like clockwork - you better be there at 10 o'clock; not 10:01,

  • not 5 to 10, because at 10 o'clock it shows up every day regularly, like clockwork.

  • Jerry always gets up for his cigarette, and his lunch, and his pee break at 12:05.

  • You know, 12:05, you look at the clock - there's Jerry.

  • How do you know it's 12:05?

  • He's going for his pee break and his cigarette; he always goes at the same time.

  • Like clockwork, happening regularly.

  • And number 11: "The 11th hour".

  • It's to do something at the last possible moment.

  • I'm just trying to think of how I run my life, which is usually at the 11th hour.

  • It's like: "It's the last possible moment, and James comes through just before the end!"

  • [Laughs] Right?

  • So, when you're doing something at the 11th hour, it means there are other moments this

  • could happen, but you're going to be right here just before that door closes on you.

  • All right?

  • "The 11th hour".

  • I was actually thinking of something I wanted to say about politics, but I'm not going to

  • do it.

  • I'm holding back, which will be a first for me.

  • But I'll say it in my head so I can giggle.