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  • So you've come down really, really

  • hard on all the violent protests and the looting that's

  • going on.

  • But you do acknowledge that they're just angry

  • and they don't know how to channel that anger?

  • Yeah, absolutely right.

  • And Atlanta is the home of the civil rights movement.

  • That's no secret.

  • So we're used to protests and to gatherings

  • and true organization.

  • But what we saw happening in our city on Friday

  • was not in that spirit at all.

  • I understand the anger and the frustration.

  • Because I'm feeling it.

  • I'm watching my children feel it, too.

  • But we also saw that there was just

  • a need for disruption from some.

  • And I went back today.

  • And I pulled the "Appeal for Human Rights."

  • It was a document that was drafted by some students

  • from the Atlanta University Center.

  • Roslyn Pope was a Spelman student.

  • And it was a very succinct document that was put together

  • during the Civil Rights Movement that

  • outlined exactly what their grievances were

  • and the resolution that they were seeking.

  • And I think that is a conversation that we

  • have to move towards now.

  • We have articulated our grievances.

  • We're angry.

  • But now, we've got to formalize it

  • so we'll know what the point of satisfaction

  • is in this country.

  • And there's so much work to be done.

  • Yes.

  • But I think a lot of-- and especially a lot

  • of the young people-- are saying the peaceful protests didn't

  • work because we're still in a situation like this.

  • So the peaceful protest don't work.

  • I feel like there has to be--

  • and I've spoken with Tyler Perry about this

  • and a lot of people--

  • there has to be a plan.

  • Even today when I call the "Appeal for Human Rights"

  • that the student is drafted in the 1960s,

  • I sent it over to Killer Mike.

  • And what I said to him is, we've got to lead this conversation

  • and create a true framework.

  • Our young people don't have any direction.

  • And there is no clear leadership.

  • But we've been through this before.

  • And I often quote Audre Lorde.

  • "Revolution is not a one time event."

  • Peaceful protests in this country got results.

  • We got through the Civil Rights Movement.

  • And we have been moving forward in this country

  • for a very, very long time.

  • But it didn't happen in an instant.

  • In the same way one protest is not

  • going to make everything suddenly go away and change,

  • it's got to be a framework for us to know exactly what it

  • is that we want.

  • We know that we want black men and women not

  • to be killed on our streets.

  • That's a very easy answer.

  • But the reality is, if we don't change our policies,

  • and if we don't acknowledge and address

  • the systematic issues that have gotten us to this point today,

  • then we're going to be in this state of chaos

  • for a very long time.

  • And I think that is such an important point.

  • Because as a white father, I have never

  • had to say to my kids, be careful when you go out there.

  • Be careful for the police.

  • And when you are a black child in this country--

  • and I've explained this to my 13-year-old twins--

  • this is something you go through every day.

  • You wake up every morning and know you are black.

  • And you know that you are going out there.

  • And you are going to be in a level of potential danger

  • that my two sons will never have to understand.

  • And I appreciate your saying that.

  • And I was even thinking back to after Ferguson,

  • having a conversation with my son, and him saying to me, mom,

  • you have no idea how hard it is to be a black boy in America.

  • And I remember his anguish and his pain.

  • And what struck me today as I was thinking about Ferguson

  • is that for his entire life he's had

  • to deal with this anguish and this pain

  • because he's seen it on television day in and day out.

  • And he feels helpless.

  • And the reality is, it doesn't matter how many conversations I

  • have of my kids and my sons, if you aren't having them

  • with your kids, then we all got to have this conversation.

  • But I do think there has been a monumental shift

  • in this country this week.

  • And I know it's true.

  • Because I'm seeing white police officers

  • take a knee next to black protesters.

  • So the fact that they are articulating

  • very boldly and very publicly, saying

  • I don't have all of the answers, but I recognize that you're

  • hurting, I think is a step that we

  • hadn't seen taken in this country at least

  • in my lifetime.

  • Yeah, yeah.

  • And then you have the sheriff in Flint, Michigan,

  • who is fantastic, who took off his uniform, his badge,

  • and marched with the peaceful protesters, and took a knee.

  • I think we have to take a break.

  • Because I want to get all this in.

  • So I'm going to take a break.

  • But that just broke my heart, just hearing your son say,

  • you have no idea how hard it is to be a black boy.

  • And it's like, I can't imagine growing up

  • with that kind of anxiety and fear.

  • And of course that creates anger.

  • Of course it goes somewhere when you're--

  • but we're going to take a break.

  • And we'll be back.

So you've come down really, really

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A2 初級

市長Keisha Lance Bottoms與殺手Mike合作推動運動。 (Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms Working with Killer Mike to Propel Movement)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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