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  • I'm going to use the Force to make you watch this whole video.

  • Hi, everybody. Welcome back to Ask Alisha.

  • The weekly series where you ask me questions and I answer them, maybe.

  • You can send your questions to me at EnglishClass101.com/ask-alisha.

  • First question from Harley Paso.

  • Paso?

  • I'm very sorry.

  • Harley asks, “What is the use of 'get' plus adverb or preposition?”

  • For example, “I get down.”

  • This is a question about phrasal verbs withget.”

  • We can use a lot of different things after the wordget.”

  • In your example, “to get down,” we use it when dancing.

  • For example, like, “I want to get down this weekend.”

  • It's sort of an old-fashioned expression though, “to get down.”

  • We can use a lot of different words after the verbget,” though.

  • For example, “get into,” to get into something means to become interested in something.

  • You might hear, “to get at,” like, “get at meorget at your professor,” to

  • get at means to reach out to or to communicate with but it's a very casual expression.

  • You can say, “get after,” like, “I need to get after my homework,” for example.

  • It means to chase after or try to do something.

  • Also, “to get in,” like, “to get into a club,” “to get into a restaurant,”

  • to get into a party,” the nuance is that something is challenging but you can gain

  • access to that thing, like, “I got into the party last night but I wasn't on the list.”

  • There are a lot of different uses of the wordget.”

  • I can't talk about all of them in this video because there are so many.

  • So, if you're curious about the various phrasal verbs that we can use with the wordget,”

  • check out a dictionary.

  • That's a really good place to start.

  • Next question!

  • Next question comes from Long An.

  • Long An asks, “What is the difference between simple past tense and past continuous tense

  • or past progressive tense?”

  • Simple past tense, we use for actions that started and ended in the past.

  • So, the beginning of the action and the end of the action happened in the past.

  • So, for example, the sentence, “I ate breakfast.”

  • is a simple past tense statement.

  • “I ate breakfast.”

  • Ateis a simple past tense.

  • The past continuous tense, however, or the past progressive tense is something we used

  • to talk about an action that was continuing at a specific point in time in the past.

  • If I want to use the past progressive tense, I can say, “I was eating breakfast.”

  • Using that continuous tense, using that progressive tense implies I want to explain something

  • else that happened at that time or maybe I want to add some more information.

  • So, for example, “I was eating breakfast at 8 o'clock this morning.”

  • or, “I was eating breakfast when the phone rang.” or, “I was eating breakfast and

  • watching TV at the same time.”

  • “I was eating breakfast while studying today.”

  • By using the past progressive, I am explaining that an action was continuing at a specific

  • point in time, as in the example, “I was eating breakfast at 8 o'clock.”

  • Or, I can use past progressive to show one action was happening at the same time as another

  • action in the past.

  • If I use just the simple past tense, I'm just saying a simple fact, in other words.

  • This action happened, “I ate breakfast at 8 o'clock.”

  • If I want to emphasize the continuous nature of the action for some reason like, “I was

  • eating breakfast at 8 o'clock.”

  • I can use the past progressive tense.

  • In that case, it might be in response to a question like, “What were you doing at 8

  • o'clock this morning?”

  • So, if someone wants to ask maybe what you were doing at a specific point in time, like

  • someone is suspicious of you, like, “What were you doing last night?”

  • You can say, “Oh, I was having dinner with my friends last night.”

  • But, past tense, simple past tense is something we use for actions which start and finish

  • in the past.

  • But, progressive, the progressive tense in past can be used to emphasize the continuing

  • nature of that situation or that action.

  • Next question!

  • Next question comes from Yassin.

  • Yassin?

  • I'm very sorry.

  • What's the difference between 'on time' and 'in time'?

  • Is it, 'You arrived just on time?' or, 'You arrived just in time?'”

  • We useon timeto refer to doing something at the correct time, doing something at a

  • scheduled time.

  • So, for example, “I need to get to work on time.”

  • meaning at the correct time.

  • Or, “Did you make it to your appointment on time?”

  • In time,” however, is used when we want to kind of give a nuance of rushing or hurrying

  • for something.

  • “I need to leave my house now to get to the airport in time for my flight.”

  • “I need to study for my test now if I want to be in time for the party later.”

  • You should probably leave now if you want to be in time for the movie.”

  • In time for something else,” so, I want to do action A to make my schedule meet this

  • other condition, this other thing I would like to do with this other thing I need to

  • do.

  • In time forhas the nuance of a deadline.

  • We can use this expression in like a panic, like, “Oh, my gosh!

  • I'm not going to make it in time.”

  • like, to submit a paper.

  • “I'm not going to make it in time.”

  • In timemeans like before the deadline.

  • Whereas, “on time,” has the meaning of completing an action or completing something

  • at a scheduled time.

  • Next question!

  • The next question comes from Gearson Silva.

  • Hi.

  • What is the difference between 'shade' and 'shadow'?”

  • Oh, great!

  • This is a great question.

  • Both of these words can be used to refer to a place that is darker than its surroundings

  • because there's an object that is blocking the light.

  • We can say, “There's shade over there.”

  • or, “There's a shadow over there.”

  • In that sentence, they are used the same.

  • However, “shadowrefers to the dark shape only.

  • So, a person can cast a shadow.

  • We usecast,” the verb, “cast,” with a shadow.

  • “I cast a shadow when I stand in the sun.” for example.

  • Shade,” however, as a noun, refers to or has the nuance of a kind of shelter.

  • So, shelter provided by some other object.

  • Shelter from the light,” “shelter from the sun,” so, we would say, “Stand in

  • the shade.”

  • becauseshadehas the nuance of shelter.

  • We would not say, “Stand in the shadow.”

  • Shadowdoes not carry the nuance of shelter in the way that shade does.

  • Interestingly enough, though, shade and shadow are both used as verbs, as well.

  • To shadow something,” means to follow something closely.

  • To shadow someone at work,” means to follow someone at work and try to understand

  • their job, for example.

  • Shadeis used as a verb to mean to create shelter from light.

  • For example, “The canopy shaded us from the sun.”

  • Shadealso has some interesting uses.

  • You might hear the slang phrase, “to throw shade.”

  • Throwing shadeis a really interesting slang expression that we use which means to

  • communicate disrespect or to communicate contempt, bad feelings for something.

  • When you're speaking generally, in most cases, when you want to talk about a dark cool area,

  • we should say, “shade,” “Stand in the shade.”

  • When you want to talk only about the dark area, that dark object, useshadow.”

  • Next question!

  • Actually, two questions from Danny.

  • Hi, Danny.

  • Danny's first question is, “You talked aboutlitas slang.”

  • Yes, I talked aboutlitin Episode 2.

  • So, 1, Episode 2 ofAsk Alisha.”

  • Can you please talk about the verblightand using it an active and passive?”

  • Sure.

  • Lightmeans to start a fire.

  • So, “to light a fire,” “to light a candle.”

  • Some examples of active and passive voice with this verb then.

  • Why don't we light some candles for dinner tonight.”

  • All the candles in the restaurant were lit.”

  • On our camping trip, my neighbors lit a fire and we brought hamburgers to make.”

  • “A fire was lit in the campsite while we were gone.”

  • “I was going to light a fire but I fell asleep.”

  • So, “to lightmeansto start a fire.”

  • He lit the house on fire.

  • We can say, “to light blah, blah, blah on fire.”

  • So, there are a few different examples of using the verblightin active and in

  • passive, past tense, future tense, as well.

  • So, I hope that that's helpful.

  • Danny's second question, “Can you talk about ride and its uses?

  • Like, 'Take someone for a ride.'

  • 'Can I take a ride?'”

  • Rideis another verb that has a lot of different uses.

  • You use the example, “to take someone for a ridemeans, “to drive together with

  • someone.”

  • To go for a ridehas the nuance of doing something just for fun.

  • It's just for fun.

  • “I want to take a ride to a location.”

  • “I want to take a ride to the mountains this weekend.”

  • or, “take a to the beach,” butto take someone for a ridemeans, “to invite

  • someone to drive somewhere with you in a car.”

  • That's one way to useride.”

  • You can also say, “Give me a ride.”

  • Can you give me a ride?”

  • So, this is a request expression.

  • I don't have a car, my friend has a car, I want my friend to take me in their car to

  • a location.

  • I can say, “Can you give me a ride to the movie theater?”

  • Can you give me a ride to the lake?”

  • Give me a rideis a request.

  • So, “give me a ride in your car.”

  • So, there are a lot of uses ofride.”

  • If you want to see all of them or if you want to see more of them, I recommend checking

  • a dictionary, there are quite a few and I can't talk about them all in this video.

  • So, please check a dictionary.

  • Next question!

  • Okay, next question is from Fem.

  • What does 'you're too good to be true' mean?

  • Is it good or not?”

  • Maybe you've heard this in a famous song.

  • You're too good to be true, can't take my eyes off of you.”

  • In that case, it's a good meaning.

  • A different way to say this expression is, “You are so good.

  • You are so amazing that I can't believe you're real.”

  • So, in other words, something must be wrong there must be some problem with you, it's

  • not possible for you to be real because you are so good, you are so great.

  • So, “you're too good to be true,” it's like, “Wow, I'm amazed by you.”

  • So, it's a good expression.

  • If, however, maybe in a more uncommon situation, someone said like, “This guy is too good

  • to be true.”

  • like maybe reviewing a job application, for example.

  • This girl, she's too good to be true.”

  • If it's said in that way, maybe there's something suspicious about that person.

  • This doesn't seem right.

  • There's just too much good information here.

  • There must be some problem with this person.”

  • Depending on the intonation, it can portray either a very positive meaning or a very suspicious

  • meaning.

  • In most cases, however, it's a positive meaning.

  • So, if you heard this in a song, for example, it's probably a very positive, kind of romantically

  • nuanced phrase.

  • Thanks very much for that question, Fem.

  • Nice one.

  • Next question!

  • Rabia Arshad?

  • I'm very sorry.

  • What's the difference between 'can' and 'may'?

  • I saw this on the dining like a champ cheat sheet and noticed these words were used for

  • requests.

  • What's the difference?”

  • Canandmayfor requests, in modern English, modern American English are used

  • the same.

  • If I use them in a statement, “canrefers to ability, “mayrefers to permission.

  • Please just be careful.

  • Canandmayare only used in the same way to make requests in modern American

  • English.

  • Next question is from Taylor.

  • Oh, hi, again, Taylor.

  • Are 'Where are you from?' and 'Where were you born?' the same?”

  • Ah, great question!

  • Where are you from?”

  • Where were you born?”

  • No, not necessarily.

  • Not necessarily.

  • Where were you born?” is only the place where you were physically brought into the

  • world.

  • Maybe, your hometown, the place you identify as your hometown is different from the place

  • where you were born.

  • Maybe you were born in Spain but you grew up in the USA.

  • Your family moved after that.

  • So, you could say, “I was born in Spain but I grew up in New York City.”

  • If someone asks you, “Where are you from?”

  • It might be a good idea to say, “I was born in blah, blah, blah, but I was raised in blah,

  • blah, blah.” in a different place if the two places are different.

  • Next question!

  • Next question is from Hassan.

  • Hassan says, “How do we use 'gotta' in the negative form?”

  • So, we did a live stream abouthave toandgot toandneed toon the

  • YouTube channel and on Facebook a while ago.

  • Gottais a contraction, a very casual contraction ofgotandto.”

  • It's not a real word.

  • Gottais just the sound that we make when we saygot tovery quickly.

  • Like, “I gotta go to school today.”