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  • Hi, everybody.

  • Welcome back to ask Alicia the Weekly Siri's where you ask me questions and I answered them.

  • Maybe first question comes from Sue N'kara Elia High.

  • Sankara Cinchona says I could do it now if you like.

  • What does could mean in this sentence does could mean ability in the present or possibility.

  • And what does likely toe happen mean in English?

  • Okay, yeah, it's something maybe that people would use to say something is possible Now.

  • I feel like we would probably say, I can do it now if you like, and it would sound like I can do it now if you like.

  • Perhaps a person would use could instead of can to make it sound a little bit more formal.

  • But it just means it's possible for me to do this now.

  • If you like, I could do it now if you like.

  • Do you have time to finish checking my paperwork today?

  • Yeah, I could do it now if you like.

  • So that's a situation where you might hear this used could will found a little bit more formal.

  • I think, then can.

  • So regarding your second question about the phrase likely toe happen, it just means there's a good chance of something.

  • So there's a good chance that something will happen in the future.

  • For example, the company says the new project launches likely to happen in June.

  • Our regular summer party is not likely to happen this year, so I hope that this helps answer your questions.

  • Thanks very much.

  • All right, let's move onto your next question.

  • Next question comes from Fabio High.

  • Fabio Fabio says, Hello, Alicia.

  • I'd like to know about some American dictionaries.

  • Which one do you recommend?

  • Okay, Yeah.

  • My favorite dictionary is Webster's Dictionary.

  • It's called the Webster's Collegiate Dictionary as well.

  • So if you can't access the physical book, I highly recommend Merriam Webster's online dictionary.

  • There are my favorite resource to use.

  • I use them pretty much every week to plan these lessons to plan other videos.

  • It's a great resource, so of course you can look up words and you confined example sentences and pronunciation there.

  • But they also do a really nice job of sharing interesting articles about like word history about new words that are coming up, and you can also do quizzes on their website.

  • They post interesting information on their Twitter feed, so I highly recommend Merriam Webster's Dictionary.

  • That's my favorite one.

  • So just Google for a Merriam Webster, and you can find it really, really easily.

  • There are a couple of other official American dictionaries, the other two like big dictionaries.

  • There's one that's called the American Heritage Dictionary.

  • That's one that I personally have not used.

  • And my understanding is that that's a very like conservative approach to standard English.

  • So that dictionary originally came about because the person the publisher felt that Merriam Webster's approach was like a little bit to open like they were.

  • Merriam Webster was allowing, like too many new words to come in, and they weren't being strict enough about what's correct and incorrect and so on.

  • So the American Heritage Dictionary was like this conservative response to that.

  • You can still find the American Heritage Dictionary online today if you want to check it out.

  • There's like example, sentences and definitions and images and things you can use to learn more about words there.

  • There's also the new Oxford American Dictionary again.

  • I have not used this one personally, but that's based on the Oxford English Dictionary, meaning British English.

  • So that's as the base has had, like some updates, to make it like an American English dictionary.

  • So that's another resource that you could consider using.

  • But my personal favorite, as I said, is Webster's Dictionary.

  • That's a great great resource to use in terms of online dictionaries.

  • Ah, like I said, Merriam Webster is good.

  • I also like to use the Cambridge Online Dictionary because in addition to searching or to being able to search for a word meanings, you can search for grammar as well.

  • So if there's a grammar point you're not familiar with, they have a grammar search tool.

  • You can also listen to pronunciations of words in British, English and in American English, and they have lots and lots of example sentences.

  • So I use those to probably the most the American English Um, Cambridge Dictionary and the American English Merriam Webster's Dictionary.

  • So those are a few dictionaries for you to check out.

  • I hope that that's helpful.

  • Thanks very much for the question.

  • Okay, let's move on to your next question.

  • Next question comes from our wrongs.

  • I pi r wrongs.

  • I hope I said that right.

  • Ah.

  • Longs.

  • I ive says, Can we use wanna gonna and Ghada Informal English writing or speaking?

  • Mm.

  • I don't recommend it.

  • Informal writing.

  • No, I don't.

  • You might hear gonna informal speaking like when we're speaking quickly, but generally using wanna sounds too casual.

  • So wana is the reduced form of want to and that even just want to I want to He wants to Might sound a little too casual.

  • Instead, we would use I would like to in more formal situations I would like to reduce is to I'd like to I'd like to um gonna You might hear it in speech.

  • I would not use it in writing, but gonna is three reduced form of going to and so that's OK to use.

  • I'm going to He's going to Some other things that you could use in place of that are like I plan to or I intend to.

  • So these refer more formally to your upcoming plans and finally got a is the reduced form of got to or have got to or have Teoh Um So this one is okay to use in the non reduced form.

  • Like I have to do something.

  • That's okay.

  • Got to might sound a little bit too rough.

  • If you want to sound like extremely formal, you could say I have a responsibility to do something.

  • Eso The short answer is no.

  • I would not use thes informal writing.

  • You can listen to the other people around you to hear if they used these words in speech because in some cases, that might be OK.

  • But in writing, I would not do this.

  • No.

  • Okay, so I hope that this helps answer your question.

  • Thanks very much for sending it along.

  • Let's move on to your next question.

  • Next question comes from Zachary High.

  • Zachary Zachary says highly Sha I have two questions.

  • First, is there a difference between a bit and a little bit?

  • Second, do you never pronounce the T at the end of a noun?

  • If there's an s after the tea in the plural form, for example, event events.

  • Ah, okay.

  • Ah, First of all, no, there's not a difference between a bit and a little bit.

  • They have the same meaning, but native speakers often like to extend the sound little to really emphasize how small something is.

  • For example, can I have a bit of cake?

  • Can I have a little bit of cake?

  • So little like extending that sound makes it sound like the peace we want is even smaller.

  • It sounds super casual and kind of goofy kind of funny, but this is how it's used, so the meaning isn't actually any different.

  • But we'd like to kind of make an emphasis phrase or an emphasis kind of like feel with it.

  • Regarding your second question, we do actually pronounce the T here in events events.

  • It's not a hard sound.

  • It's more like a So it's like the tongue touches the back of the teeth quickly and then makes it sound so you can kind of try to imitate the sound of like a symbol in a drum set.

  • That's the same exact sound.

  • Like events, events tense, tense, dense sense events.

  • He's all in ts sounds.

  • T sound is pronounced, but it's just not.

  • It's not events.

  • It's all together.

  • We don't say events.

  • It's all together.

  • It's so if I don't make the tea sound, it sounds totally bizarre.

  • It sounds like Evans Evans, which would make like a Z sound.

  • So the tea is pronounced.

  • It's just kind of softened events events.

  • So practice making that sound.

  • And I think that this sound at the end of these words will become a little bit easier to say.

  • All right, so I hope that that helps you and good luck with your continued pronunciation practice.

  • Let's move onto your next question.

  • Next question comes from Alexey High, Alexey, Alexey says.

  • How correct is the expression?

  • And this weather had been happened in the sense that sometimes the weather was bad in the past.

  • Ah, to express that idea, Maybe try saying this bad weather has happened before.

  • So something has happened before We use has been before a verb in the continuous tense to express like a continuing condition or we use has been before an adjective to express like a condition like a recent continuing condition.

  • So, like, for example, this bad weather has been going for days or like the weather has been terrible lately, So we would not use has been happened.

  • We can use has happened like this.

  • Bad weather has happened before.

  • That's fine or we can use has been continuous has been adjective form.

  • So I hope that that helps you.

  • Thanks very much for the question.

  • All right, That's everything that I have for this week.

  • So thank you.

  • As always for sending your questions.

  • Remember, you can send your questions to me at English Class 101 dot com slash ask hyphen Alicia Also, if you like this video, please don't forget to give it a thumb's up.

  • Subscribe to our channel if you have not already and check us out in English.

  • Class 101 dot com for some other things that can help you with your English studies.

  • Thanks very much for watching this week's episode of Ask Alicia and I Will See you again next week.

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A2 初級

CAN和COULD之間的區別 - 基礎英語語法。 (Difference between CAN and COULD - Basic English Grammar)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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