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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • I'm Katherine, and joining me today is Tom.

  • Hello, Tom.

  • Hello, Catherine.

  • Good morning.

  • On what story have you been looking at today?

  • Days Story is a about a radio deejay, a radio deejay.

  • Let's hear more from this.

  • BBC will service News Bulletin, a British radio deejay who's healthy, unofficial distinction of broadcasting to the smallest audience in the country, has hit the big time.

  • After 44 years deep, Duncan, who 73 began broadcasting from his garden shed in 1974 but only to his wife through a speaker in his living room as he didn't have a license.

  • Dick Duncan has now been offered a one hour special on BBC local radio over the Christmas period, So the story is about a 73 year old radio deejay who's finally received a chance to go on the BBC.

  • Before this opportunity, he had an audience of only one person, and that person was his wife, and he broadcast to his wife for more than 40 years, and this was because he didn't have a radio licence.

  • Our lovely So from the garden shed to the BBC Studio Time.

  • Fantastic.

  • And you've been looking at the headlines about this story.

  • I have three words and phrases for three words and phrases for today.

  • Number one slot number two gets a break and number three, a pop slot gets a break on a pop.

  • Can we have your first headline, please?

  • Of course.

  • My first headline is from BBC News, and it says Shed station D.

  • J given BBC local radio slot flopped a hsieh jeweled period of time.

  • So what can you tell us about a slot?

  • Tom?

  • A slot is a space that needs to be filled, and in this case, we're filling our slot with these.

  • Review.

  • Right, so we've got a slot.

  • 10 til 11 is our regular slot, which is a high frequency qualification.

  • Got it.

  • So a period of time and this guy's getting a period of time on the BBC to do his radio show.

  • Fill it with his radio program.

  • If it's ah slot in a very popular period, you can tell it's a prime slot so prime stop would be maybe eight oclock at night.

  • Nine oclock to you whenever you're going to get the biggest audience.

  • That's normally around when you'd have it.

  • God s O slot is always about time.

  • No, it's not always about time.

  • There's other uses of slot as well.

  • On a slot can be any space that you put something into or fit something into.

  • So, for example, on your laptop you've got smaller holes to put your USB stick.

  • And if I want to charge my phone, I can put the charger into the slot in the computer.

  • Cool on.

  • Is it always a noun slot?

  • No, it's not.

  • It can also be a verb.

  • So if I want to charge my phone, I take the cable on dykan.

  • Slot it into the computer, so slot into even slot it into the slot and hear this loud.

  • Okay, Onda mother.

  • It's always for things and slot or slot into.

  • We could use it in a more figurative way as well.

  • So if a company, for example, has a job vacancy, they want to fill that we have a slot for whatever.

  • The job is so here at the BBC.

  • We have slots for journalists.

  • A jobs loved a job slope.

  • Fantastic.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Tom.

  • I'm coming now Move on to your next headline.

  • Of course I can't.

  • My next headline is from the Telegraph shed Deejay who broadcast audience of one gets BBC break after 44 years so gets a break.

  • Means receives favorable treatment Now I said gets our break but there's no ah in this headline Is there something about the world?

  • BBC There is There's no in the headlines because sometimes headlines don't use act to save space Also, BBC Break This is the kind of break.

  • It's the break from the BBC, the favorable treatment from the BBC and it sounds good in the headline, But but But BBC break nice newspaper device.

  • So break in has got nothing to do with breaking things so that they don't work.

  • It's something completely different, isn't it?

  • It is.

  • It means finally, it means to receive favourable treatment.

  • And often we'd use it with the word finally So I finally get a break because it suggests a period of times gone before.

  • Okay, Thank you.

  • Um on it means an opportunity to do something great.

  • But we can also use it in another way.

  • Can't way we can save I.

  • You know, if I say give me a break.

  • A my asking for an opportunity for fame and fortune Or is it something else?

  • No.

  • The context is slightly different.

  • So, for example, there's one member of our team who really likes to talk.

  • Oh, I don't know who you're talking.

  • Let's imagine that it's Dan.

  • Okay, let's imagine.

  • So this morning I was preparing for news review on my computer, and Dan came across and he started to talk to me about comics and did I want to go out in the evening ahead?

  • Then give me a break?

  • Yeah.

  • Give me an opportunity to do what I need to do.

  • Give me some space.

  • I'm getting the sense you weren't too happy about the interruption.

  • No.

  • You know, it's not the most positive expression given.

  • Give me a break.

  • Basically means leave me alone here.

  • Okay?

  • Right.

  • Anything else we need to know about break possessive pronouns, perhaps?

  • Yes.

  • Going back to the original meaning.

  • So we have the deejay who gets his big break from the BBC and notice I said two things there he gets a big break.

  • This is a common col occasion, and he gets his break so we often use it with a personal program.

  • Okay, wonder you're gonna get your big break.

  • I'm sure, Tom.

  • I hope I get my big break in one day.

  • Somebody, other news, somebody We watch the news review, you'll get the call and he'll be down there in this studio presenting this success.

  • Will I say sorry, I have a regular slot in the newsroom now.

  • Yes, we won't let you go.

  • So let's have a look at your final headline for today.

  • My final headline four Today is from the Times and it says God and shed D J.

  • Gets a pulp at prime time.

  • A pop and opportunity.

  • Um, what can you tell us about a pop?

  • It's a nice normally, isn't it?

  • That's on the matter, Peer.

  • Yes.

  • Yeah, what a bubble might pop, but no.

  • In this instance, a pop is an opportunity.

  • And if you get a pop, you receive on opportunity.

  • So we got a pop from the BBC, OK, and you can use Pop when you describe what you're going to do you could say you get a Pope two or a pop it so you get a pop at So in the headline Garden shed, D J gets a pop at prime time prop.

  • T To get a pop.

  • Ask, plus a noun or gerund means an opportunity to do something exactly fabulous.

  • So one day Tom, when you get discovered by the BBC World News, they'll give you a pop at presenting on their prime.

  • Maybe one day I'll get a pop at presenting the news, and if I get that opportunity, I will need toe, have a pope, have a pot, which is another verb we can use.

  • Means.

  • Try to do something.

  • Yeah, so you can sort of if you advise someone to try something, have a pop have ago.

  • Have a go.

  • See how it how it gets on.

  • It might be difficult.

  • Might succeed, might not see it sees.

  • But hey, have a proper exactly.

  • So if my computer is broken, I could say, Catherine, my computer's broken.

  • It's really annoying.

  • Can you have a pop?

  • I'll have a puppet your computer any time Tom Car governed to the result, but I'll do my best and if I If I break your computer, you'll probably quite annoyed at me.

  • And if I am annoyed with you, I will have a pop at you.

  • That doesn't sound very nice.

  • No, if you have a pop at somebody, yeah, it means you have a go or you say something unpleasant to make them angry or upset or because you want to fight with them.

  • Yeah.

  • If you have a poppet, someone because you feel angry, Catherine, you ruined my computer.

  • Why did you do that?

  • You're so annoying.

  • I'm having a pop and I just go.

  • You're wearing those stupid glasses again, aren't you?

  • Tell, That's not very nice having a pup.

  • Brilliant.

  • So can you know Recap.

  • Today's vocabulary, of course.

  • Slot a scheduled period of time gets a break, receives favorable treatment.

  • And finally, a pop, which means an opportunity, thank you very much.

  • And if you'd like to have a pop, it a quiz footed.

  • He's Bokeria Larry.

  • Thank you.

  • There's a quiz you can take on our website BBC learning english dot com.

  • You can also find us on Twitter, Facebook instagram YouTube on our fabulous new up, and you can come back and see us every Tuesday on our regular slot.

  • The news review.

  • Love it, Thank you very much.

  • And we'll see you next time.

  • Goodbye.

  • He's review from BBC Learning English.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

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臥室DJ終於出名了:新聞評論 (Bedroom DJ is finally famous: News Review)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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