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  • Hi, I'm Liam.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English!

  • In this lesson, you can learn how to talk about sport in English.

  • Are you a sport fan?

  • What sports do you like playing?

  • Sport is a common topic in English conversation, so whether you like sport or not, it's good

  • to have something to say and be able to ask some questions about sport.

  • Before we start, a question: do you find it difficult to listen to English for long periods?

  • No problemuse the English subtitles to help yourself understand!

  • Turn them on now; just click the 'CC' button in the bottom right of your video player.

  • On a smartphone, tap the settings button.

  • Do you like sport?

  • Yeah, I've always been really sporty.

  • I played basketball and tennis at school and university, and recently I've got into cycling.

  • What about you?

  • I'm not that into sport, to be honest.

  • I'm not that athletic, and I find most sports boring to watch.

  • I go to the gym occasionally.

  • It's hard to motivate yourself if you don't enjoy it.

  • Do you like watching sport, too?

  • Sometimes, though I'm not a fanatic.

  • Football or tennis can be fun to watch, I think, but it's not a big part of my life.

  • I like watching tennis, too!

  • It's one of the only sports I'll make an effort to see.

  • Do you like sport?

  • Think about how you could answer.

  • You could say something like: 'I've always been really sporty.'

  • 'I enjoy watching sport sometimes, but I'm not a fanatic.'

  • 'I'm not that into sport, to be honest.'

  • Do you know what the words 'sporty' and 'fanatic' mean?

  • 'Sporty' describes someone who's really interested in sport, and who plays sport often.

  • A 'fanatic' literally means someone who only cares about one thing.

  • You can use it with an indirect meaning to describe someone who's really interested

  • in something.

  • So if you say, 'I enjoy some sports, though I'm not a fanatic', you mean that you

  • like sport, but it's not the most important thing for you.

  • Okay, you have three sentences.

  • Which is closest to your opinion?

  • These are good sentences to start talking, but remember that you should always add more

  • detail if possible!

  • Let's add some reasons or details to the three sentences you saw: 'I've always

  • been really sporty.

  • I played basketball and tennis at school and university, and recently I've got into cycling.'

  • 'I enjoy some sports, though I'm not a fanatic.

  • Playing football or something like that can be fun, but I don't want to take it too

  • seriously.'

  • 'I'm not that into sport, to be honest.

  • I'm not very athletic and I find watching sport quite boring.'

  • These are already much better.

  • If you can add reasons or details when you speak, your speaking will sound better, too!

  • Let's look at some useful words here:

  • 'Athletic' describes someone who's in good shape and who enjoys exercise and sport.

  • If you say 'I'm not very athletic' you mean that you aren't very good at sport,

  • and probably you don't really enjoy it, either.

  • Another very useful phrase is 'I find…', as in 'I find watching sport quite boring'.

  • This is a very good way to give your opinion about something.

  • For example:

  • 'I find watching snooker weirdly fascinating.'

  • 'I find swimming very relaxing.'

  • 'I found volleyball much more difficult to play than I was expecting.'

  • So, what about you?

  • Do you like sport?

  • Pause the video and make at least two sentences.

  • Remember to add reasons and details.

  • Okay?

  • Next, we're going to look at how to talk in more detail about different kinds of sport

  • that you do.

  • So, what are you up to this weekend?

  • We have a match on Saturday; no plans for Sunday yet.

  • A match?

  • You mean you're playing?

  • Yeah, have I not told you before?

  • I play 5-a-side football in a local league.

  • We play most Saturdays.

  • Where do you play?

  • Indoors, actually, in a sports hall.

  • That sounds fun.

  • How did you get into that?

  • I do it with some old friends from university.

  • We played when we were students, and we've kept it going since then.

  • Anyway, what about you?

  • Any plans?

  • I also have a big sporting weekend!

  • It's the marathon.

  • You're doing the marathon?!

  • Not exactly – I'm doing a half.

  • That's what, 21 kilometres?

  • Yup.

  • I didn't know you were so into running.

  • I wasn't.

  • I used to go jogging once a week or so, just around the park or whatever.

  • Then, I decided I needed a challenge, so on impulse I signed up for the half marathon.

  • So, you must have been training a lot?

  • Quite a lot, yes.

  • I've been running three or four times a week for the last two months.

  • Are you confident?

  • Yeah, I think it'll be fine.

  • I've done training runs that are around 20K, so I don't think finishing will be

  • a problem.

  • Look at three sentences: Which two did you hear in the dialogue?

  • You heard these two.

  • Another question: here you have different sports with the verbs 'play', 'go',

  • and 'do'.

  • Can you think of three more sports you can use with each

  • verb?

  • Pause the video and think about your answers!

  • You use 'play' with most ball sports.

  • That means you play tennis, play cricket, play golf, play basketball, and play volleyball;

  • you can also play badminton, which is not a ball sport.

  • Use 'go' with activities ending in -ing.

  • Most of these are individual sports; you can go swimming, go cycling, go surfing, go climbing,

  • or go hiking.

  • You might be thinking: “what about 'boxing'?”

  • Even though it ends with -ing, you say 'do boxing' – it's an exception.

  • Use 'do' with other activities, mostly individual sports.

  • You do yoga, do gymnastics, do judo, or do Pilates.

  • There's one more question you heard in the dialogue: 'how did you get into that?'

  • What does this mean?

  • This question is asking how or why you started something.

  • Now, think about some questions: what sports do you do?

  • How did you get into it?

  • Where and how often do you do them?

  • Think about how you could answer these questions.

  • Before you try, let's look at three examples.

  • 'I really enjoy playing cricket.

  • I joined an online group and we meet in the park once a week for a game.'

  • 'I started doing judo about a year ago.

  • I go to classes twice a week at a sport centre near my office.

  • At first, I just wanted a new hobby, but I really like it and I think I'll start training

  • more regularly.'

  • 'I like playing basketball.

  • I've been playing since I was a kid, and now I play for a local team.

  • We train three times a week and have matches once or twice a week, sometimes in our town,

  • and sometimes in other cities.'

  • OK, now it's your turn!

  • Think about a sport or physical activity you do.

  • Try to make a few sentences talking about it; say where you do it, how often, and how

  • you started.

  • Pause the video and do it now!

  • How was that?

  • Remember that you can always review a dialogue or a section if you need to.

  • Let's move on to our next point.

  • How was the game?

  • Amazing!

  • We crushed them!

  • 'Crushed them'?

  • That sounds dramatic!

  • It was great.

  • There's no better feeling than winning.

  • Wow

  • You're so competitive.

  • Yes, true!

  • I love it.

  • Some people say that sport's about taking part, not winning, but I don't agree.

  • That sounds a bit intense.

  • I play a lot of tennis and badminton, but for me, it's more about the social side.

  • Also, I just like the feeling of getting some physical activity after sitting in an office

  • all day.

  • Fair enough.

  • Personally, I can't motivate myself to do any sport unless it's competitive.

  • That's why I mostly just do team sports.

  • I can't go jogging, or go to the gym, or anything like that.

  • I just don't see the point.

  • I don't know

  • I think if it gets too competitive, then it stops being fun.

  • Personally, I play sport to hang out with my friends and relax.

  • It's nice to win, but I don't care that much.

  • Why do people do sport?

  • How many different reasons can you think of?

  • Some people do sport to socialize.

  • Others love to compete.

  • For some people, sport is just a way to get fit and stay healthy.

  • What about you?

  • Why do you do sport?

  • In the dialogue, you heard some possible answers to this question.

  • You can see some useful language here for giving your opinion about things.

  • You can use these phrases to give your opinion about many different things.

  • For example: 'There's no better feeling than when you're tired after a good game.'

  • 'For me, the most important thing is just spending time outdoors in the fresh air.'

  • 'I just like the feeling of pushing myself to the limit.'

  • 'Personally, I've always loved being in the water.'

  • What about you?

  • Can you describe why you do sport, and why you like the sports you like?

  • Pause the video, and try to make two or three sentences.

  • Use the language from this section if you can.

  • Alright, so now you can say quite a lot about sport.

  • Let's put everything together.

  • To make a longer answer, you need to talk about your general attitude towards sport,

  • talk about which sports you like, say where and how often you do sport, and who you do

  • them with, and talk about why you do sport.

  • Here's one example: 'I enjoy some sports, though I'm not a fanatic.

  • Playing football or something like that can be fun, but I don't want to take it too

  • seriously.

  • I play 5-a-side football with some friends every Sunday.

  • We rent a sports hall and play a 60-minute match.

  • For me, the most important thing is the social side.

  • I don't really care about the game, or who wins.

  • I just like having a laugh with some good friends and getting a beer afterwards.'

  • This example only uses language from the lesson.

  • You can see how you can build an interesting, detailed answer using simple ideas.

  • Let's do one more example, using original language and ideas: 'I don't really like

  • sport that much, but fitness and staying healthy are important to me.

  • That's why I go swimming and do some weight training regularly.

  • I mostly just exercise by myself at the sports centre.

  • Personally, I just do it because I feel I have to.

  • I don't really enjoy it, although I don't mind it, either.

  • I do like feeling healthy and fit, but exercising always feels more like work than something

  • fun.'

  • Okay, now it's your turn.

  • Make a longer answer like the two you've just seen.

  • Follow the same structure, and use the language from the lesson if you can.

  • Don't forget that you can write your answer down if you want extra practice.

  • Also, it's a good idea to practise your answer several times, until it's really

  • fluent and comfortable.

  • Then, if you're really serious, don't just make one answer!

  • Make several answers, talking about different sports.

  • Even better, make an answer from someone else's point of view.

  • If you practise like this, your English will get better very fast!

  • Thanks for watching!

  • See you next time!

Hi, I'm Liam.

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A2 初級 美國腔

用英語談論體育--提高英語口語會話水準。 (Talk About Sports in English - Improve Spoken English Conversation)

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