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  • Eat Sleep Dreamers, welcome to London. There is sunshine outside, there is beautiful music

  • being played, beautiful music. I thought why not, let's go for a walk around London and

  • I'll teach you some great British English expressions. A walk around London and an English

  • lesson, what an amazing idea! I can't wait, let's go outside and check it out, see what

  • we can learn.

  • Ok, I'm walking through a food market, the smells are amazing. Check it out I'm super

  • hungry, anyway! This has reminded me of a really useful phrase, a really useful word,

  • fancy. Now it means kind of do you want, want basically. So you might say, you know, 'Do

  • you fancy a pizza?' it means do you want a pizza? Or you know I'm walking around, there's

  • some amazing pasta right there, I might say 'I really fancy some pasta' and that means

  • I really want some pasta. So fancy, we use it to mean want.

  • Eat Sleep Dreamers, if you want to sound like you are in a romantic comedy like love actually,

  • one of those typical British romantic comedies you could use or you should use the word 'lovely'.

  • Now lovely has a few meanings. Obviously we know it means beautiful for example I'm in

  • a really lovely park right now. Russell Square, it's absolutely beautiful but also lovely

  • can mean enjoyable or pleasurable. So for example I might say 'I had really lovely evening

  • last night' means I had a really enjoyable evening. I might say 'It was lovely meeting

  • you' again it could mean it was really enjoyable or pleasurable meeting you. So lovely is used

  • so often in films like Love Actually, any film with Hugh Grant probably says lovely

  • a hundred times. It's a great word to sound really British.

  • One of the most common words that we say in British English or certainly in Britain is

  • sorry. Now sorry, obviously it has the meaning of apologising, right? So 'Oh I'm so sorry'

  • for some reason we apologise all the time in Britain, I don't know why. Even if it's

  • the other person's mistake. Let's say someone bumps into me on the train, I'll say sorry

  • to them. I'll say "oh sorry!' It's ridiculous, I don't know why we do it. I guess we just,

  • we don't want to upset anyone. I think that's it, we don't want to upset anyone. We want

  • to make sure everyone is happy, Anyway, ok so we say sorry for that reason. We also might

  • say sorry if we didn't hear someone. So if you didn't hear what someone's said you would

  • say 'Sorry?' and that means could you say it again. It's a polite way to ask them to

  • say it again. I think probably fifty percent of my words are either sorry or cheers or

  • all right? Yeah, probably about that I think. Maybe I need to vary my vocabulary a bit more.

  • Guys I'm right next to the British museum, shall we pop in? Yeah, I think so. Let's take

  • a little look in the British museum. Now that's another really British English phrase, is

  • to pop somewhere. It means to go somewhere so pop in means like go inside. If I live

  • in a house and I want to go next door I might say 'I'm just popping next door.' it means

  • just I'm going to go very quickly so go for a short time. Yeah very quickly, you could

  • say the preposition changes quite a lot. So you could pop up, so let's say you live in

  • a big flat block, an apartment block you might pop upstairs, so 'I'm just going to pop upstairs'

  • to see your friend who lives upstairs. So to pop somewhere is really great. To go quickly

  • and come back. Maybe 'I'm going to pop to the shops' so I'm going to go to the shops

  • and then come back. So I'm going to do something really quickly, to pop. Amazing! So shall

  • we pop inside the British museum? Let's do it!

  • Alright, I'm in the British museum, it's an amazing place. The light right now, the roof!

  • You guys need to see the roof, it's amazing. Ok, so the word I want to look at today in

  • here is 'cheers'. Now cheers obviously we know it to be when you are celebrating and

  • you put your glasses together and you say cheers but also very British, it's a very

  • British way to say thank you. So someone opens a door for you you say 'Cheers'. If someone

  • does something nice for you you can say 'Cheers' It's a really nice way to show your appreciation

  • and to say thank you. I think I might stay here for the rest of the day, this is amazing.

  • Honestly the roof is incredible.

  • We are back out in the sunshine, oh my god, it's incredible today. All right, next phrase

  • to be up for something. I love this phrase. To be up for something. It kind of means to

  • want to do something or to have the enthusiasm to do something. So I might say 'Are you up

  • for going to the cinema tonight?' And that means do you want to go to the cinema, do

  • you have the enthusiasm to go. I might say 'I'm going to the gym, if you are up for it?'

  • Again it means I'm going to the gym, do you want to come/would you like to come? It's

  • a really natural British English phrase that. So to be up for something. A few grammatical

  • things here. Firstly after for you need, the verb has to be -ing ok? Are you up for going...Are

  • you up for seeing?...Are you up for visiting? Things like that. And also the auxiliary in

  • the question is the verb to be, right? So Are you up for visiting?' Were you up for

  • it?' you know so in the past obviously there. So the auxiliary is be and the verb afterwards

  • has an -ing. Ok, I'm going to teach you a few more British English expressions if you

  • are up for it, are you up for it? Ok, let's keep walking, talking and learning.

  • Ok, this is a classic British word 'dodgy'. And it means you can't trust it, it's untrustworthy.

  • So people can be dodgy, you could say 'That guy looks a bit dodgy' and it kind of means

  • he looks untrustworthy, you can't trust him. Food can be dodgy as well.You could look at

  • a slice of pizza and think 'that look a bit dodgy' like it might make you ill, you can't

  • trust it, it doesn't look like it will do you good. So food can be dodgy. A situation

  • can be dodgy you could see people doing something you think 'that looks a bit dodgy' like why

  • are they doing that, it looks a bit weird. So yeah dodgy is a really, a really great

  • British word.

  • This is one of my favourites to take the piss. Piss is a bit rude, this is very informal

  • but to take the piss. Now this means to mock someone or to make fun of them. Now we can

  • do it in a funny way or we can do it in a mean way. So you've got both, so you know

  • my friends and I, I've said this before, my friends and I. I used to have really bad haircuts,

  • not anymore right? And they used to make jokes about my hair and they were taking the piss

  • and it was funny. I hope it was in a fun way, not in a mean way so that's one way you know

  • 'they took the piss out of me'. That's absolutely fine but then you could do it in a mean way

  • as well so it has both sides to it. As I said it's very informal, so you want to be careful

  • who you use it with but it's such a typically British phrase. Maybe it's a typical British

  • idea, the idea that we mock each other, we make fun of each other and it's kind of accepted.

  • So yeah, to take the piss, brilliant phrase.

  • It wouldn't be a British English expressions lesson if I didn't talk about the word mate.

  • Mate is the word we use to mean friend. It's informal and we use it all the time. I might

  • say 'Hi mate' or 'You all right mate?'. All right mate kind of means hello mate. We use

  • it all the time, it's crazy. Cheers mate, like thank you. It's an amazing phrase and

  • if you want to speak British English mate is one of the best words to know.

  • If you want to sound British then you must use this one word, loo! Now the loo means

  • the toilet, it's the polite way to say toilet. So you could say 'I'm just going to go to

  • the loo' it means I'm just going to go to the toilet. It's a classic classic British

  • term. If you want to be super polite you could say 'I'm going to spend a penny. Now to spend

  • a penny means to go to the loo and it's because in the past we literally, to go to a public

  • toilet you would have to put in a penny coin and you could go to the toilet so to spend

  • a penny means to go to the toilet.

  • I hope you've enjoyed seeing London in the sunshine. It's beautiful, if you would like

  • me to do more of those walks and lessons at the same time then let me know. I'm now in

  • St Pancras station this is where the Eurostar goes. That's the train to Paris, unfortunately

  • I'm not going to Paris, I'm going, I'm staying in London, that's ok I like London. Anyway,

  • thank you guys for joining me today. I hope you've enjoyed it. Remember if you've found

  • this useful please give it a like, subscribe to my channel and of course if you know anyone

  • who is trying to learn English then please share it with them. I want to spread Eat Sleep

  • Dream English to as many people who want to know English as possible. Alright guys, this

  • is Tom the English Hipster saying you know what time it is, it's time to take your English

  • to the next level!

Eat Sleep Dreamers, welcome to London. There is sunshine outside, there is beautiful music

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A2 初級

10種常見的英式英語表達方式 (10 Common British English Expressions)

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    Summer 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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