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  • Hello there, and welcome back to Learn English Lab.

  • In this lesson, I'm going to teach you 11 short conversation phrases that you can use

  • when you talk to people.

  • These are all common English expressions, and they will help you sound more like a native

  • speaker of the language.

  • So, let's jump into it.

  • Number one is “I'm afraid” – this phrase does not show fear (it doesn't mean

  • that you're scared) - this is a polite expression used to say something negative, and it's

  • very useful.

  • For example, say someone calls an office and asks to speak to the manager: “Hello.

  • Could I speak to Mr. Peterson, please?”

  • His secretary is the one answering the call.

  • She says, “I'm afraid he's not here right now.”

  • Or let's say one of your friends comes to you and says, “Hey, I'm broke.

  • Can you lend me $500 until next month?” – here, “I'm brokemeans I don't

  • have any money.

  • AndCan you lend me $500 until next monthmeans “I'll pay you back next month.”

  • But you say, “I'm afraid I can't, sorry.

  • I'm out of cash myself.”

  • (means I don't have money either).

  • In a meeting at your workplace, one of your colleagues says something that you disagree

  • with, but you want to be polite, so you say, “I'm afraid I don't agree with you.”

  • In all of these sentences, “I'm afraiddoesn't mean that you are scared of anything;

  • it just adds politeness to what you're saying.

  • So, get into the habit of using “I'm afraidto make negative messages a little softer.

  • Number two is ASAP.

  • This is an acronym; that is a short form ofas soon as possible”.

  • But, the short form is so common that you can use it as a single wordyou can say

  • “a-sap” – “asap”.

  • We use this most commonly when we request someone to do something immediately.

  • Your boss at work might say: “Send me the report ASAP.”

  • Or, you if you phone somebody but they're not available; someone else answers the phone,

  • you can say, “Please tell her to call me back ASAP.”

  • One of your friends wants to apply for a job but hasn't sent in the job application yet

  • and the deadline is fast approaching.

  • So, you give advice to your friend.

  • You say, “If you want to apply for the job, you should send in your application ASAP.”

  • Remember that ASAP simply meansas soon as possible”.

  • Number three isnot really”.

  • All it means isno”, but it's a more soft and politeno”.

  • Let's say you go to a party at your friend Tom's house, but the party isn't all that

  • good; it's boring and the food's terrible.

  • But another friend, who's thoroughly enjoying it, comes to you and asks: “Hey, are you

  • having a good time?”

  • And you say, “Not really.”

  • You want to saynobut you want to say it in a soft way.

  • At the same party, you meet a guy who just loves golf.

  • And he asks you, “Are you into golf?”

  • You don't want to saynoand be rude, so you make it a little more polite: “Not

  • really”.

  • A couple of days later, your friend, Tom, who threw the party finds out that you didn't

  • like it; he calls you up and he asks, “Hey, have you been telling people that my party

  • sucked?”

  • And you say, “Not really”.

  • That's not what I've been saying to people.

  • Now, your mom overhears the phone conversation; she comes to you and she asks, “What was

  • that all about?

  • Did you just have a fight with Tom?”

  • And you say, “Not really.”

  • It was just a small argument.

  • But we're good.

  • The next expression isGood stuff!”.

  • You say this to congratulate or encourage someone.

  • If a friend of yours says, “I joined a gym today because I want to get in shape.”

  • You reply by saying, “Good stuff.”

  • That means, “That's good to hear.

  • You've done a good thing.

  • Congratulations!”

  • If the news is not just good, but great, you can saygreat stuff”.

  • When my niece came to me and told me: “Uncle Gan, I just got accepted to law school.”

  • I said, “Great stuff!

  • I'm really happy for you.”

  • Another time I said this was when I ran into my neighbor the other day.

  • I said, “Hey, Raj.

  • You look happy.

  • What's the occasion?”

  • He said, “I got a promotion at work recently.”

  • I replied, “Great stuff, man!”

  • That is fantastic news.

  • Now, if the news is not so good, then you say, “I'm sorry to hear that”.

  • Sorrydoes not mean that you are apologizing; it just shows that you feel bad for the other

  • person: “I didn't get accepted to Harvard university.”

  • “I'm sorry to hear that.

  • Have you tried applying to Stanford?”

  • “I got laid off from work recently.”

  • Oh, I'm so sorry to hear that.

  • But, keep your chin up.

  • I'm sure you'll find another job soon.”

  • Now, “I got laid offmeans “I was fired from my job”.

  • Our house burned down, and we lost everything.”

  • What do you say?

  • “I'm really sorry to hear that.”

  • Phrase number six is: “Give me a hand”.

  • This expression is just a fancy way of asking for help.

  • You're not actually asking for a hand, so this is an idiom; it's informal, it's

  • conversational and it makes you sound more like a native speaker.

  • For example, let's say you're trying to move some boxes, but they're too heavy for

  • you.

  • So, you ask someone else to help you with them: “Can you give me a hand with these

  • boxes?”

  • At work, one of your colleagues says: “I'm writing an important email, but I'm having

  • trouble wording it correctly.

  • Can you give me a hand?”

  • You can also use this expression to offer help by sayinggive you a hand”: “Can

  • I give you a hand with those bags?”

  • So, you're offering to help someone carry some bags.

  • Next up is the phraseYou're kidding me”.

  • The wordkiddingmeansjoking”.

  • You say this phrase when you're angry, annoyed or irritated, as if you can't believe how

  • bad the situation is.

  • Let's say you let a friend borrow your cell phone for a while.

  • But then your friend comes back to you and says: “I dropped your phone by mistake and

  • the screen's cracked.

  • I'm really sorry.”

  • And you say, “You're kidding me!”

  • Right?

  • This is a joke; you're playing with me.

  • Don't tell me you actually dropped my expensive iPhone!

  • (Although I know that that phone in the picture is not an iPhone, but you get the idea.)

  • Or if you get to the airport late for a flight, the person at the check-in counter might say,

  • “I'm afraid I can't check you in.

  • You're too late and the gate's closed.”

  • If you're really angry, you might respond withAre you kidding me?

  • I'm only two minutes late!”

  • Now, I remember back when I was in school, I worked very hard studying for a test.

  • It was the most confident I'd ever been about an exam.

  • But, then when the results came, this other kid in my class came to me and said, “Hey,

  • the test results are in, and you failed.”

  • I couldn't believe it.

  • I said, “You've got to be kidding me!” – this is the strongest form of this expression

  • – “you've got to be kidding me”.

  • Thankfully, he was kidding that time; not only did I pass the test, I got an A+.

  • I was first in class.

  • Believe that.

  • Phrase number eight isFair enough”.

  • It means, “I can accept thatorThat sounds acceptable / reasonable.”

  • Imagine that you're in a restaurant with a business contact.

  • You ask: “Do you want to try the chicken parmesan?”

  • He says: “I can't eat that.

  • I'm a vegetarian”, and you say: “OK, fair enough.”

  • Meaning, “I understand”, “That's reasonable.”

  • We can have eggplant parmesan instead.

  • Or, let's say your friend interviewed for a job and got the job but decided not to take

  • it.

  • You ask: “Why didn't you take the job?”

  • He says: “Because the pay was too low.”

  • And you say: “Fair enough.”

  • I can understand.

  • Here's a conversation between two students in the school cafeteria: “I forgot my wallet.

  • Can you pay for my lunch today?

  • I'll pay for yours tomorrow.”

  • Fair enough.”

  • That works for me.

  • Number nine is “I couldn't care less”.

  • We use this fancy expression to say that we absolutely do not care about something.

  • I once asked a friend of mine this question: “Who do you think really invented calculus:

  • Newton or Leibniz?”

  • He said: “Man, I hate math.

  • I couldn't care less who invented it.”

  • You can feel his distaste for mathematics in that sentence.

  • Of course, you can dislike things other than mathematics.

  • When someone asks me: “What's your favorite soap opera?”

  • I say, “I couldn't care less about soap operas.”

  • If you don't know what a soap opera is, it's basically any long-running TV series

  • that is a drama.

  • And next time one of your annoying friends asks you: “Hey, guess which celebrity couple

  • just divorced.”

  • you can reply: “Please don't tell me.

  • I couldn't care less.”

  • Number ten issick and tired”.

  • This is kind of related to the previous one, but this expression is more serious.

  • It means you're fed up, you cannot tolerate something.

  • For example: “I'm not going to watch the news anymore.

  • I'm sick and tired of all the negativity.”

  • Now, I read in the newspaper today about a group of factory workers going on strike.

  • One of them was quoted as saying, “We're going on strike because we're sick and tired

  • of not getting paid on time month after month.”

  • Now, my brother is a very smart guy.

  • But he often tends to get stuck in a rutthat means, he sometimes does the same things over

  • and over again.

  • So, when I went to visit last month, I asked him, “Aren't you sick and tired of eating

  • macaroni and cheese for breakfast every single day?”

  • Can you guess what he said?

  • He said, “Not really.”

  • And the final item in this lesson is the set of these three phrases: “I'd better get

  • going / I've gotta go / I've gotta run”.

  • These are some polite yet stylish ways of saying goodbye: “I have to pick up my kids

  • from school.

  • I'd better get going.”

  • “ I've gotta go.

  • Catch you later.”

  • (thegot tosounds likegotta” – “I've gotta go”).

  • It's getting late.

  • I've got to run.”

  • These all mean the same thing: there is some reason why you cannot stay and chat; you have

  • to go.

  • And, with that, I hope you enjoyed this lesson.

  • I'd love to stick around, but there's some place I need to be, so I'd better get

  • going.

  • Happy learning, and I will see you in another lesson soon.

Hello there, and welcome back to Learn English Lab.

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A2 初級 美國腔

11個簡短的英語會話PHRASES--說一口流利的英語--英語中的常用表達方式。 (11 Short English Conversation PHRASES - Speak Fluent English - Common Expressions in English)

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    Henry 楊 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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