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  • SECRETARY POMPEO: Good afternoon, everyone.

  • It always concerns me, though, when you applaud before the speech.

  • (Laughter.)

  • So hang on, hear what I say, and see what you think.

  • I was reminded – I walked through a little bit earlier and I saw these card catalogs

  • in the libraryreminded me I've used those.

  • I see young people, you have no idea what's in those drawers.

  • Reminds me how old I am.

  • It's great to be with you all today.

  • Foreign Minister Payne, thank you for the very kind introduction.

  • We had a great meeting this afternoon alongside our counterpart Minister Reynolds and my new

  • counterpart Mark Esper.

  • And weyou and I had just seen each other in Bangkok, so I'm sure she's getting

  • sick of me by now.

  • And I'd be remiss too if I didn't extend my thanks to the people of Australia for such

  • a warm welcome here for myself and Susan.

  • The same goes for those of you who are here today, the dignitaries, including Minister

  • Turnbull; Penny Wong, the shadow minister of foreign affairs; Ambassador Hockey; our

  • ambassador, A.B. Culvahouse; Jennifer Westacott, the chair of the business council; and Dr.

  • John Vallance, the New South Wales librarian who's responsible for this amazing place

  • that we find ourselves today.

  • And of course, a special thank you to Tom Switzer and the Center for Independent Studies

  • for hosting us here today.

  • I look forward to taking your questions.

  • We'll see if you can stump me.

  • Entirely possible.

  • I also want to congratulate Prime Minister Morrison on his recent victory.

  • My wife Susan and I have been in campaigns before.

  • We know how raucous they are, and thank you for your willingness to serve.

  • I look forward towe have a chance to see he and his wife tonight and we're very

  • much looking forward to that.

  • I know too that President Trump and the First Lady are looking forward to hosting them at

  • the White House for a state dinner at the end of next month.

  • And I'd like to take some time today too to talk about things that matter, the reason

  • that I came here.

  • That's the relationship, the unbreakable alliance between our two countries, and how

  • we on the American side see this developing.

  • I'll keep my remarks short because I'm eager to get Tom up here and have a go, and

  • we'll take some questions.

  • I wanted to get here.

  • It was important for me to get down here.

  • American diplomacy depends on showing up, especially talk with your closest friends,

  • not give lectures.

  • This is a new era.

  • America doesn't do that.

  • The Trump administration knows you're a partner, we are not your professor.

  • I want to tell you about a story, about a man who epitomized what our friendship is

  • all about here.

  • Your prime minister told it to President Trump last year, but it's so good that I'm going

  • to steal it.

  • His name was Leslie Allen, but everyone in his brigade called him Bull.

  • Bull was an Australian who carried a stretcher during World War II and won admiration for

  • fearlessly rescuing comrades wounded in theon the battlefield.

  • In 1943, American and Australian troops were fighting side by side in what was then the

  • Territory of New Guinea, taking very heavy casualties.

  • That didn't stop Bullthus, I suspect, the nickname.

  • He relentlessly raced back into the fray over and over again.

  • When all was said and done, Bull had delivered 12 wounded Americans to safety, even carrying

  • them on his back.

  • For his heroism, Bull received America's Silver Star.

  • Now that's what I call showing up for your friends.

  • This is a friendshipour friendship is one that was truly meant to be.

  • History reflects that.

  • We are continental democracies.

  • We are nations of strivers.

  • We've both been through national struggles for civil rights and emerged the other side

  • far better for it.

  • We set an example for the world to follow each and every day.

  • Now, don't get me wrong.

  • We're not exactly the same – I had an earpiece in case I needed a translation today

  • from your reportersbut when wewhen it comes to the things that really matter,

  • the things that we all value so muchdemocracy, the rule of law, respect for human rights.

  • This is why we fought side by side in World War I and in World War II and in Korea and

  • in Vietnam and in Iraq and in Afghanistan today and in Somalia, in our ongoing battle

  • against ISIS.

  • And of course we share the ultimate bond: a commitment to come to one other's aid

  • and to act to meet threats against one another's homelands, via the ANZUS Treaty.

  • Americans will never forget how we invoked ithow you invoked it after 9/11.

  • Treaties should mean something.

  • I know that the one between our nations does.

  • But remembering those old glories matters, and it's wonderful, but it's not enough.

  • It's not to keepenough to keep our people safe today, or our people prosperous,

  • or our people free.

  • Nations need to know today who is with them, and for the long haul.

  • And it's true that you have your own perspective on the Pacific, but it's not all that different

  • from ours.

  • It's true that other competitors are out there, but you're learning that all that

  • glitters is not gold.

  • It's true that the United States can sometimes, I'm sure, seem far away.

  • It's a long flight between us, as I just experienced.

  • The pilot said it was headwinds.

  • I'm pretty sure it was just a big ocean.

  • But if there's one thing I want you to know today, it's this: The United States is a

  • Pacific nation.

  • I grew up on the shores of southern California.

  • And we are here to stay with Australia as a friend and as an ally.

  • You heard me say earlier that I had great meetings with Minister Payne in Bangkok and

  • today.

  • Singularly, my biggest takeaway from those conversations is that the days of Australia

  • as a middle power are coming to an end.

  • That's a good thing for the region; it's a great thing for the world.

  • It's a turn that the United States welcomes, because you stand for the same things that

  • we do: transparency and the rule of law, basic human dignity and freedom, responsible trade

  • investment, partnership, not domination.

  • We've seen this as you've stepped up in the Pacific.

  • We welcome your new diplomatic posts all across the neighboring islands.

  • We're grateful for your focus on Southeast Asia and your commitment to fighting crime

  • in the Mekong region.

  • We're delighted as well to see Australia support regional infrastructure projectsprojects

  • that are open, transparent, corruption-free.

  • And we commend your decision to investigate what Confucius Institutes are really doing

  • on campuses here in your country.

  • That builds on your courage to shine light on state-sponsored election interference as

  • well.

  • And the United States is prepared to work right alongside you to ensure that every nation

  • can have free and fair elections.

  • Nearly two years ago now we deployed our free and open Indo-Pacific strategy.

  • It's one that fits with your approach as well.

  • In fact, we borrowed the name from you.

  • We both know the principles that we love will strengthen the region.

  • Implementing them starts, as always, with diplomacy.

  • We had a great trilateral meeting in Bangkok with our Japanese friends.

  • We've worked together in what we call the Quad, and we are revitalizing it.

  • It continues too with military cooperation.

  • I was a soldier once not so long ago, and today we're conducting military exercises

  • that would've been unthinkable alongside our allies the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan,

  • as well as New Zealand.

  • And we've taken new steps to reassert the rule of law throughout the South China Sea.

  • We all need to do more.

  • Now, economicallyand I know there are many senior business leaders here with us

  • today, and I'm thankful for thateconomically, we are your number one source for foreign

  • direct investment.

  • And we're proud of that.

  • We do more than 65 billion in trade each year, and President Trump is always eager to find

  • ways to boost America's numbers.

  • And we're encouraging some of our best and brightest towards the success in this region,

  • too.

  • Today I have the honor to announce the creation of four Indo-Pacific Fulbright Scholarships

  • two funded by the United States and two funded by your great countryto conduct

  • research on the Indo-Pacific region.

  • So with this good foundation in place, let's crack on as allies in our shared Pacific home,

  • and all over the world.

  • Let's help our neighbors secure their economic independence.

  • We can get the Papua New Guinea electricity project we started last year over the finish

  • line.

  • I know we will.

  • Foreign Minister Payne said she would turn the first shovel when I was with her today.

  • Let's help other countries, too, in the region meet their energy needs.

  • Strong nations prove their mettle when we tackle those security challenges together.

  • Australia has supported our efforts to put pressure on North Korea to enforce the UN

  • Security Council resolutions that have the opportunity to take a nuclear threat away

  • from the entire world.

  • And you've shown true leadership in making sure that your sovereign decision to protect

  • your 5G networks will work.

  • But I know we can do more, and we talked about some of it today.

  • Australians know the scourge of terrorism.

  • How can we better stop fighters that are in Syria today from returning, from setting up

  • camp in Southeast Asia?

  • The United States and Australia depend on freedom of the seas so that we can each have

  • prosperity.

  • And I'm convinced too that we can work together to keep all shipping lanes open, even those

  • that are further away in the Strait of Hormuz.

  • Let's do more through meaningful, effective multilateralism, not empty gestures.

  • It's one thing to talk; it's another thing, of course, to do.

  • And we've built good new momentum.

  • We've built momentum within the Quad, and there's lots of room for growth.

  • Let's get more done through the Pacific Islands Forum as well, and through ASEAN,

  • where Foreign Minister Payne and I spent the last two days.

  • I hope too that those of you who are in business here will visit and attend the Indo-Pacific

  • Business Forum that'll be held in Bangkok in November, a real opportunity to build economic

  • ties between the United States, Australia, and all of the countries in the region.

  • It's a great chance for government and business leaders to explore new investments throughout

  • the region.

  • I want to end by quoting what one Australian writer said about our friendship back in 1910.

  • He said, quote, “The United States and Australia are neighbors, united rather than divided

  • by the vast emptiness of [the] Pacific waters.

  • They facewith an unchanging front of friendshipTogether they pursue the high ideals of brotherhood,

  • liberty, andjudgment of a man by his own” – judging “a man by his own inner worth

  • rather than the accidents of birth or [good] fortune.”

  • That's a fancy way to saythe way this guy from Kansas would put it, but the point

  • stands: We're Pacific friends, bound together by an ironclad commitment to our shared values

  • and our joint success.

  • And I am confident that this unbreakable alliance will maintain them now and forever.

  • Because that's what friends do.

  • God bless you.

  • God bless Australia and the United States.

  • And God bless me as I take questions from Tom today.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you all.

SECRETARY POMPEO: Good afternoon, everyone.

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蓬佩奧部長在澳洲發表講話 (Secretary Pompeo remarks from Australia)

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    Yeung-On Yu 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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