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  • - Hey everyone, Sal Khan here from Khan Academy.

  • Welcome to our daily homeroom live stream.

  • If it's your first time and are wondering what is this?

  • This is a live stream that we started doing

  • every day since school closure started happening

  • 'cause we realize as a not for profit with a mission

  • of free world class education for anyone anywhere,

  • we have a role to step up.

  • It's our duty to step up to support teachers, parents,

  • and students as we all navigate through this crisis.

  • And so we've been trying to put as many supports out

  • as possible teacher webinars, parent webinars,

  • (mumbles) class schedules, frameworks for learning plans

  • for students, and also this homeroom.

  • And this is a way to stay connected

  • in times of social distancing

  • and to just talk about interesting things.

  • Many of which might be related to the crisis

  • or whatever else is on folks' mind.

  • I do like to remind folks as I just did,

  • that we are not for profit

  • and we can only exist through philanthropic donations.

  • So if you're in a position to do so

  • please think about donating,

  • we were running at a deficit even before the crisis

  • and now we're seeing about two and a half

  • to three times the traffic we normally see,

  • and you could imagine that plus all of the other programs

  • and content we're trying to accelerate

  • are only making our costs go up higher.

  • I do wanna give a special thanks

  • to several corporate partners that stepped up

  • over the last couple of weeks when they realized

  • how big the need was to support everyone

  • on the education front for COVID.

  • Special thanks to Bank of America, Google.org,

  • Fastly, AT&T and Novartis.

  • They've made a huge difference,

  • but we still are running at a deficit.

  • So any more help from either corporations

  • or individuals is very, very much appreciated.

  • So with that we'll get into the heart of this live stream

  • and sometimes we have guests and sometimes we don't

  • or I guess you could say today I am the guest.

  • And so we could treat this livestream as really

  • just a ask Sal anything so you can get on the Facebook

  • and YouTube message boards and literally ask me anything

  • and I have team members that are helping me

  • surface interesting questions.

  • But we also said that given that this is the end

  • of Teacher Appreciation Week

  • that we wanna make sure teachers feel supported

  • especially as they're all trying to navigate

  • this world of distance learning or making videos.

  • And so I'm also happy to answer questions for teachers

  • who are wondering what are tips we might have

  • for making content, for making videos

  • and what are the tools we have?

  • So feel free to put those questions in.

  • I already have a question from Facebook

  • Jay is asking,

  • "I must admit that I would be happy

  • if I just knew the name of the tablet

  • that Sal uses to present.

  • That is the biggest challenge when teaching remotely.

  • I cannot tell you how many times teachers have said,

  • if only we had tablets like Sal uses."

  • All right I will tell you the name of the tablet

  • I actually have it right over here,

  • and I'm not normally about product endorsement.

  • So I'm not sure if this is the best tablet out there

  • or what but it's definitely met my needs.

  • So let's see this is the Intuos Pro Medium Pen Tablet.

  • I think it costs 100 or $200, it looks like this,

  • and it will come with a pen that...

  • Whoops I'm pressing buttons on it,

  • I hope (mumbles)...

  • It comes with a pen that looks like this.

  • This camera is kind of a reverse mode.

  • So there you go.

  • So that is the tablet and I think the cost really increases

  • as you go from the small, to the medium, to the large.

  • For many years at Khan Academy I had the small version,

  • which was I think was $70,

  • and you can go pretty far with that.

  • So yeah hopefully that is useful

  • and obviously this is useful.

  • Tablets like this are useful

  • for making Khan Academy style videos.

  • And I actually use a tablet like that with a pen

  • and I use Camtasia to record my screen

  • and this is the microphone that I have.

  • This is a Samson...

  • And once again,

  • I'm sure there's other good microphones

  • let's see Samson CO3U,

  • I just realized it wouldn't make do much good

  • if I'm reading the model number

  • when my mouth is on the other side of the microphone.

  • But just with that and Camtasia

  • you can make exactly the types of videos I make.

  • And obviously, this is useful for all of y'all

  • who are also doing live, Zoom or Google Hangout

  • type sessions as well 'cause you can share your screen

  • and then use your art program.

  • Oh, and I use SketchBook Pro for the art program,

  • but you could use others.

  • I like to just use something that's quite responsive.

  • Some of the art programs that get super fancy

  • there's a little bit of a lag and that bothers me.

  • So that's what I try to do,

  • and I've been working with some teachers

  • running some live sessions as well.

  • And so I use the exact same tools for that

  • where I can share my screen and share the art program.

  • I will say a low tech hack for the live sessions,

  • and actually in theory you could do this

  • for your videos as well,

  • is those those small whiteboards that we have students

  • do their problem on,

  • you can literally just have one of those

  • and write with a with a marker.

  • I've actually found that to be reasonably good

  • especially for the kind of the live sessions

  • when you're trying to work with students.

  • So from YouTube Matthew Masters asks,

  • "Sal, do you think there will always be a place

  • for classroom learning

  • or will online learning eventually become the standard?"

  • Simple answer is yes I think

  • there will always be a place for classroom learning,

  • or I hope there will always be a place

  • for classroom learning.

  • Especially for students who haven't reached adulthood.

  • So I would say for K through 12 for sure,

  • because in theory yes students could learn

  • a lot of the academic skills

  • potentially on their own time and pace,

  • on things like Khan Academy,

  • and or you can have Zoom sessions

  • and you can have this kind of distance type of learning,

  • but that's only part of what

  • really makes the school experience powerful.

  • There is a whole other level

  • of having incredible teacher mentors,

  • being able to form bonds with them,

  • being able to do extracurricular activities,

  • all of the socialization that goes on in school,

  • knowing how to work in groups,

  • knowing when to communicate,

  • when not to communicate, know how to get your point across.

  • These are all super important skills

  • that you'll never see on any standardized test,

  • but we all know that they're very, very important

  • for overall life and success.

  • So, I've always said If I had to pick

  • between an amazing teacher and amazing technology

  • I would pick the amazing teacher every time

  • and I would prefer to have that amazing teacher in person,

  • so we should definitely strive for that.

  • And I think I would want it for my own children

  • and frankly all children.

  • And so I think the interesting question

  • over the COVID crisis is,

  • how do we get as close to that as possible

  • given the constraints that we have of social distancing?

  • And then longer term,

  • hopefully when we get out of this crisis sooner than later.

  • How do we leverage the best of both worlds?

  • So I think hopefully we're gonna go back to school,

  • kids are gonna be to get that socialization,

  • they're gonna be back in those classrooms

  • with their amazing teachers,

  • but then everyone has built a stronger muscle

  • for sometimes maybe the distance learning does work

  • maybe over summers, maybe over breaks, maybe after school.

  • It doesn't have to just be

  • between the teachers and the students,

  • it could be older students and younger students

  • or it could be the peers working together,

  • so I think that would be a good takeaway

  • from this whole process.

  • I think higher education, there are some real questions.

  • I loved my college experience,

  • I loved sitting in the dorm and pontificating

  • about philosophical questions

  • and I met my wife and many of my best friends in college.

  • So I definitely think that was a very valuable experience,

  • but there's a lot of students

  • who, there's huge trade offs.

  • They need to help support their families,

  • they might want you to start make money

  • while they're in college,

  • and so I think in cases like that

  • when just you have more of adult learners,

  • I think there will always be a place

  • for the in person college experience.

  • But I can imagine some adult learners

  • decide that that's not for them

  • and that they could still get their college degree

  • and learn all the material,

  • but do it at their own time and pace

  • and be a little bit more flexible

  • because maybe they hold a job

  • or they have to support their family and things like that.

  • So, my personal view is I hope we only double down

  • on the physical experience but leverage some of the tools

  • we're all exploring with a little bit more as well.

  • So from Facebook, Jaya Gupta asks,

  • "How can I become a good teacher?

  • Because I'm teaching my students,

  • but some students are not taking it seriously.

  • Please tell me dear sir, what to do."

  • Jaya, I won't pretend like I have all of the answers.

  • And I in the Khan Academy journey

  • I've done a certain flavor of teaching,

  • but there's a whole other dimension of teaching

  • which you and many other amazing teachers

  • are doing on a day to day basis

  • that I think I can learn a ton from y'all

  • versus the other way around.

  • My best advice, though, is try to make it

  • as interactive as possible,

  • and when you do that think about it.

  • And this actually goes to the earlier question

  • about in person versus digital.

  • I think there'll always be a place for in person,

  • but we should always be conscientious of what maybe digital,

  • or online, or software, or videos could do.

  • So, if you're just giving a lecture for 10 minutes straight

  • in theory, that could happen over a video.

  • And so if that could happen over video

  • then maybe it should happen over video,

  • but then that liberates you to do something else.

  • And it's not like all of a sudden there's nothing to do,

  • you could have a Socratic dialogue,

  • you could have a simulation,

  • you could have a project,

  • you could put a problem up on the board

  • that's a little bit more challenging

  • and have the students struggle with it a little bit.

  • Have them break into groups

  • and try to come up with their own answers,

  • and then present it and you're walking around nudging them,

  • giving them a little hint for the ones that get stuck.

  • So I think there's a huge opportunity

  • for that classroom to just interact

  • with more with each other.

  • Those students that you might be describing

  • whose eyes are glazed over a little bit,

  • I generally think if you told that student,

  • "Hey, pair up with the person next to you

  • or form a group of three or four, here's a puzzle,

  • here's an interesting challenge,

  • here's a philosophical question."