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  • Hey! Hello everyone! It's Kemushi-chan Loretta.

  • This video is a long time coming.

  • Over all of these long years,

  • so many of you have asked me to give my personal review of Rosetta Stone.

  • I speak Japanese, and in the video where I explained why, I mentioned that

  • I grew up down the street from the Rosetta Stone offices.

  • At high school during career fairs,

  • the one table that I was always really excited to go check out was the Rosetta Stone career fair table.

  • And I've always had my eye on it.

  • I mean honestly, Rosetta Loretta, Rosetta Stone.

  • How about Loretta Rocks? I've been juicing that joke for over two decades.

  • It's meant to be.

  • So today, we're going to do a review,

  • and of course, because I'm a maniac,

  • talk about five steps that helped me learn how to speak Japanese.

  • So, let me grab my phone.

  • So, this video is actually in collaboration with Rosetta Stone

  • because you may have noticed I'm not holding any big yellow box with CD ROMs inside.

  • They actually have a new app, and they asked me to test it out,

  • and share my honest review with you guys.

  • You probably know the name of Rosetta Stone,

  • but from what I checked looking at the service already

  • If you're like me and you've been trained in text books,

  • you're going to notice that this is a little bit different.

  • Rosetta Stone is a software, and now an app as well, that focuses on

  • language immersion through images and sound.

  • That means there's no English.

  • You're supposed to basically work through the language and get used to it more organically that way.

  • So when you first open it, you notice that there are a couple kind of core lessons.

  • Language basics, greetings and introductions, work and school, shopping, friends and social life.

  • Let's say we're starting from day one.

  • Core lesson

  • "Hello" x2

  • "Post office"

  • "Post office"

  • It immediately asks you to start speaking.

  • "The cafe is on his right."

  • "The theater is on his right."

  • The thing about Rosetta Stone Lifetime is that not only do you have the target language that you purchased,

  • but you also have access to every other language in the program.

  • Look at that. Merhaba.

  • Can the app actually handle writing and reading in different scripts that are not just romanization?

  • So I first came here and turned this on,

  • and what that did was within the lessons

  • it actually started putting in hiragana in between the actual image and sound cards.

  • For "inu" (dog) there would be an image of an inu, and thenwould show up

  • so you know what character it is.

  • You can also go into the script section.

  • You can change it down to hiragana and katakana,

  • or if you're not trying to learn how to read and write at this exact moment in time,

  • and you just want to learn the sounds, you can still use just romaji.

  • I also peeked at the Mandarin Chinese as well,

  • and I saw that you could toggle in between

  • you could choose between simplified or traditional Chinese as well.

  • There's a section called audio companion.

  • You can basically download the lessons beforehand and keep practicing.

  • You can do that on the go.

  • There are stories that go along with every single unit.

  • "Okinawan Fish"

  • "Okinawan Fish"

  • "Ryouji works at a post office in Okinawa."

  • It's already judging my pronunciation.

  • No~

  • It checks your pronunciations, and you'll get this little green circle if it was okay.

  • By the very end of the lessons, if you work your way all the way through,

  • you're looking at a lower- to medium-intermediate level.

  • I think this is a good starting point if you are a beginner

  • or a lower-intermediate, and you're still getting used to the language,

  • but you want to learn to actually force yourself to speak, and to have your pronunciation checked.

  • But I think if you're trying to actually learn to read and write,

  • that's something that you're going to have to do outside of the app.

  • I think there are basically two types of people who could benefit from this app.

  • The first type is people who really want to travel. If you're anyone like me, for example,

  • and you want to travel and go to a bunch of different countries,

  • the Vietnamese, Mandarin Chinese, Brazilian Portuguese, etc.

  • When I travel to places, I want to be to speak a little bit of the language,

  • and I want to be able to pick up what I'm hearing.

  • That's part of the fun of traveling for me.

  • But I don't necessarily want to learn how to read and write textbook college level.

  • If you are an advanced tourist who likes to travel and be able to enjoy your time at the bar at the restaurant, etc,

  • using an app like this is something that could actually help you get speaking

  • and listening more quickly than if you sat down with a textbook.

  • That being said, on the other side,

  • if you're the type of person who's actually trying to learn

  • how to read and write and academically learn this language

  • so that you can go to school and/or get a job,

  • this is going to help you with your speaking and your listening,

  • but for the writing and the reading,

  • I think that's something you'd still have to supplement on the side.

  • I would recommend first learning kana, hiragana, and katakana

  • so that you can use this app without having to use romaji.

  • Working through the lessons would be a lot more fun,

  • and you would be ready to travel a lot more quickly

  • if you use an app that focused on speaking like Rosetta Stone.

  • I honestly wish if they added like a JLPT course,

  • or if they added in something like that,

  • I think that would be so cool because then you could actually focus on like the listening section.

  • Just my two cents from Loretta to Rosetta.

  • Personally, I'm actually excited about the lifetime app

  • because there are so many languages that are on this side of the globe.

  • You know, I went to Vietnam last year, and I bought a book,

  • and I learned nothing. I could say nothing.

  • If you want to be able to dabble in a lot of languages,

  • I'm basically going to be using this to scout out other languages in my free time.

  • So that is a review of the Rosetta Stone lifetime app.

  • If you guys want me to keep you updated on the other languages and other features,

  • feel free to ask me in a comment, and I'll let you know.

  • Thank you to Rosetta Stone for letting me review the Lifetime App.

  • Polyglots, travel enthusiasts, people who are interested in more than just one language,

  • and people who are more interested in speaking and listening,

  • I think you're going to have a lot of fun using an app like this.

  • If you're interested in trying this out for yourself,

  • I have a link for you guys underneath the description that'll get you a discount,

  • and if you're looking to try a lot of different languages,

  • the lifetime app where you can easily toggle between all of the languages,

  • they're all included for life. There's a discount for that as well in the description below.

  • Which other language do you think I'm gonna go for first? Leave me a comment.

  • So,

  • about this speaking thing.

  • So the first tip that really got me speaking in Japanese

  • and really kind of like getting rid of that accent was repetitive shadowing.

  • Recently, there are a lot of textbooks even that do shadowing.

  • "Takarakuji de atatta sou desu." --> "It seems I've won the lottery."

  • But with a textbook, you can't always pick who it is that you're shadowing.

  • It has to be someone that you look up to.

  • It has to be like an "akogare" (admiration) or someone that you actually want to sound exactly like.

  • For me, this started with anime, then I moved up to dramas,

  • but recently, I've been getting into a lot of Japanese YouTubers.

  • Like kemio. He's hilarious.

  • He's Japanese, and he lives in New York. So it's like really nostalgic.

  • It's like I get to see home in Japanese.

  • So there's that, but he speaks really fast.

  • I really like to listen to Watanabe Naomi.

  • She is so funny, and recently she's been doing a lot of live streams on her channel now.

  • Pick your favorite YouTuber. Listen at first while you're doing something.

  • So like for example, while you're doing your laundry,

  • and then after that, you want to sit down, focus and listen, and then get ready

  • to mimic.

  • The thing I really like about YouTubers is that they're repetitive.

  • They usually have an intro, a format, and an ending

  • that they repeat in every video. Unlike the JLPT listening section,

  • it's not like being hit by a truck like, you know what's coming.

  • If you just follow the same person, and use the same clip over and over and over again, you start to kind of

  • "minitsukeru" --> "learn"

  • To get it, you start to get it.

  • The next thing you want to do is when you're focusing is sit down, and

  • begin mimicking the actual audio sample that you pick.

  • I always kept an audio diary.

  • I originally started this because it was homework when I took Mandarin Chinese classes.

  • and then I started doing it for Japanese, and then I started doing YouTube.

  • I read this on an ad on a train somewhere

  • that was like you're the only person who can't see what the back of your haircut looks like.

  • And I was like, "Oh my gosh."

  • It's the same thing with YouTube. As soon as I started filming, I really started hearing my mistakes, and

  • hearing what my Japanese actually sounded like.

  • When you're actually sitting there listening to yourself,

  • you really start to pick up your mistakes, and you really start to fix them a lot faster.

  • I used to use the program called Audacity, but recently I just my phone.

  • Hearing yourself in the third person is what makes this key.

  • My audio diary usually was anywhere from one to three times a week.

  • I would do free speech for three minutes, listen to it,

  • make a list of all the words I wish I had known, then

  • imitate someone in a whole different clip on a different day,

  • and then the third day, I would try to use those words again in

  • a new audio sample, and then just repeat week after week,

  • week after week, week after week.

  • The next tip has to do with books. Here's what I mean.

  • Did you hear any speaking?

  • Like, I get so many comments asking how many kanji do I know,

  • how many kanji have I memorized. Like, you do realize that

  • studying kanji and memorizing words

  • has nothing to do with the muscle memory in your mouth.

  • It's like a sport, you know.

  • You can watch people play, or you can actually practice,

  • and if you don't practice, you can't get in the game.

  • What's more useful than just looking at it quietly

  • is to actually look at these and read them out loud into your audio diary.

  • Imagine that, huh.

  • Here's a Vietnamese book I bought that helped me not at all

  • because I sat there on the plane reading quietly.

  • My next tip is to immerse yourself at home as much as possible.

  • Some people like to label everything in their house.

  • Some people like to talk to themselves like a maniac.

  • Specifically, I found something that really helps is to change all of your software into Japanese.

  • When I first started working in Japan, I was given computers at work.

  • First of all, getting used to the keyboard is one thing,

  • getting used to the programs you think you know

  • in a different language was a whole other business.

  • You can only rely on so many hotkeys.

  • Just now for the video,

  • I used Rosetta Stone in English, but up until this video,

  • it had actually been in Japanese mode.

  • It's like now you can see those same screens are now all in Japanese.

  • Just like what the books, just seeing these words on the screen

  • or in the task bars wasn't enough for me.

  • I was still having a lot of trouble. One thing that helps me recently was to start taking online courses

  • for these programs in Japanese.

  • I recently took in Adobe Illustrator course in Japanese. The course was beginner level,

  • but the point was that I needed to learn the walkthrough

  • of the entire screen and the entire software in Japanese.

  • So now at work, instead of just being like

  • Again, you can do this with YouTube too,

  • with almost any of your hobbies,

  • whether it's design or code, tech, food, diet.

  • Explain what you're doing into recording.

  • This is something you actually have to do.

  • You have to put in the elbow grease for this type of stuff.

  • Just watch a beginner video in Japanese,

  • and start learning how to talk about it in Japanese,

  • and you can mimic it,

  • and put it in your audio diary, and shadow,

  • and you're gonna do great.

  • Quick note. The easiest way to find the correct

  • Japanese word for the proper noun that you're trying to learn

  • If you go on Wikipedia,

  • not Google, Wikipedia

  • and search for that word, and then change the language settings to Japanese,

  • then you'll see the actual

  • word for that type of thing.

  • If you put photo manipulation into Google,

  • you're going to get a whole different word then if you actually

  • look up the word on something. For example,

  • like just changing the language setting on Wikipedia.

  • Copy and paste it into YouTube, and

  • find someone who talks about what you like,

  • and see how much more realistic your Japanese will get.

  • So tip number five.

  • You're probably wondering what my super hack is at this point.

  • The word for it is

  • "effort."

  • This is the elbow grease. This is the effort.

  • This is the old heave-ho that you've gotta give.

  • In other words, there is no super hack.

  • There is no shortcut.

  • Some people write ten kanji ten times a day, and that's how they learn to write.

  • Some people go to work and talk to people every day for eight hours.

  • Some people keep audio diaries and take lessons over and over and over again.

  • I've been making YouTube videos

  • and trying to speak as much Japanese as possible for over ten years.

  • If you find a local meetup or a local event where people