Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • We've got blood tests, we've got nasal swabs,

  • all kinds of ways to detect the coronavirus,

  • and now we can add to that mix, poop,

  • specifically, wastewater.

  • There's a company called Biobot

  • that's analyzing this wastewater

  • to try and look for the coronavirus.

  • And they've found that in a lot of cases,

  • the virus is much more widespread

  • than the more conventional test would show.

  • So let's head off to Massachusetts

  • to interview the founders of Biobot.

  • Would you two mind introducing yourselves,

  • maybe Mariana first?

  • My name is Mariana Matus.

  • I am co-founder and CEO of Biobot Analytics.

  • My name is Newsha Ghaeli,

  • and I am co-founder and president at Biobot Analytics.

  • Your company, the two of you have come up

  • with a pretty unique way to look at the coronavirus.

  • I mean, you're talking about sewage

  • coming from different parts of the country, right?

  • Correct.

  • We can detect the virus in wastewater

  • because people who are infected shed the virus in stool,

  • and it makes its way into the wastewater infrastructure.

  • Then wastewater treatment plants collect samples

  • and send them to us.

  • Right now, Biobot has a pro bono campaign,

  • and we are testing about 10% of the US population

  • on a weekly basis, versus about 1% of the US population

  • that is being tested through the clinics.

  • And the results that you've already seen

  • are pretty striking.

  • Yeah.

  • Our first results were gathered

  • from a large metropolitan region in Massachusetts.

  • And on the day that the samples were collected,

  • there were about 450 confirmed clinical cases

  • in that community.

  • And what we were able to see via sewage testing

  • is that there were up to 100,000 people

  • infected with coronavirus in that catchment area.

  • So just dramatically more

  • than what the regular tests were showing?

  • Yeah, exactly.

  • There's actually a large asymptomatic population, likely,

  • or individuals who have very mild symptoms.

  • and so they're not seeking out testing.

  • However, they're captured and represented in sewage data,

  • and so we're seeing them in our tests.

  • And I know you get a 50-milliliter sample.

  • How is that representative of an entire city's population?

  • So, treatment plants,

  • they can sample the wastewater

  • as it comes into the treatment plant constantly

  • through 24 hours to guarantee that we get representation

  • from every toilet flush that went through that community.

  • And then from that aggregate sample,

  • they are taking a small aliquot and sending that to us.

  • And using that sample,

  • we measure how much virus was present in the wastewater

  • with a technique called QPCR,

  • that looks for the genetic signature of the virus.

  • Okay.

  • And you'd already had this company up and running

  • to look for other, what,

  • other diseases in wastewater already?

  • Correct.

  • We originally were working with the opioid epidemic,

  • measuring the concentration of different types

  • of prescription opioids in wastewater

  • to create better programs.

  • It's not the most glamorous job, maybe.

  • What drew you to this field?

  • I really grew up with hardship,

  • so I've always been passionate about creating technologies

  • that help with equity and just bringing better resources

  • to people who need it.

  • And the beauty of looking at wastewater as a diagnostic

  • is that everybody has a voice in the sewer.

  • You don't need to have the money to go to the doctor.

  • You don't need to have medical insurance.

  • As long as your house is connected to the wastewater,

  • your information is counted,

  • and we can bring that to create better programming.

  • What's your vision for how this plays out

  • over the coming years?

  • Yeah, our vision is that one day this technology

  • will be basic infrastructure for every city

  • and town worldwide.

  • So we will be constantly screening our populations

  • for new outbreaks of the novel coronavirus.

  • And in this next week, two weeks, three weeks,

  • there's just going to be more and more data

  • coming out, obviously, from the work you're doing.

  • All of the facilities that we're working with

  • really believe that weekly testing is very important.

  • One of the biggest questions facing government

  • and decision makers right now is how and when

  • can we start to safely open up our cities again

  • and our economies again,

  • and testing at scale is one of the most critical things

  • in order to help us get there.

  • And we're not going to be able to test

  • every single individual; that's just not realistic.

  • And so, this type of testing can really be helpful

  • in making these types of decisions

  • of scaling back quarantine-style measures

  • or social distancing.

  • And so, all of the facilities that we're working with

  • are sending us weekly samples,

  • we're giving weekly data back to them,

  • and, yeah, we're excited to see how that progresses.

We've got blood tests, we've got nasal swabs,

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

您的馬桶沖水對科維德-19有什麼啟示? (What Your Toilet Flush Reveals About Covid-19)

  • 3 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字