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  • Ten on number 12, please. Ten on number 12.

  • Whether you're waging the cash in your pocket or hundreds of thousands on a single race,

  • this is an industry which attracts gamblers from far and wide.

  • And it's not just here at the races. Every year, billions of dollars are staked at boxing

  • arenas, on soccer fields and golf courses all around the world. So what keeps people

  • coming back for more, and is it ever possible to beat the bookie?

  • Five pounds. Just five quid, turned it around. Bit of racing, bit of money, so I'm always

  • up for it. I have not got a clue what I'm doing.

  • Three times in our history we've paid out the big one million.

  • Just got my first one in and fingers crossed.

  • If they can beat us, they're usually pretty happy.

  • For the bookmakers, the global sports betting business is booming. Last year, the total

  • amount bet was more than 500 billion dollars. Even after bookmakers paid out winning bets,

  • the total gross turnover was still nearly $65 billion dollars.

  • To give an idea of how lucrative the industry has become take a look at Denise Coates.

  • She's the CEO of BET365, one of the UK's biggest betting firms. She's also the best

  • paid female executive in the world. In 2018, she earned $353 million dollars, that's

  • two and a half times more than Apple's Tim Cook, the CEO of one of the most valuable

  • companies in the world.

  • So surely that means the people betting, otherwise known as punters, are losing all their money?

  • I got a lovely pair of wedding shoes. Yeah that was our biggest winner.

  • Someone had a £5 acca a few weeks ago and won £35,000.

  • When those days did come, when you are... You cry.

  • Terrible gambler, I lose all the time. I had a full head of hair when I started this business.

  • This game can tame lions.

  • If you're new to betting, one of the first things to understand is betting odds.

  • Once you understand how likely an event is to happen, you'll be able to work out what

  • your potential winnings will be.

  • At first, it may appear confusing, but let us explain it for you.

  • All betting odds do is present how likely an event is to happen.

  • Let's take for example a coin toss. When flipped there's either a 50% chance of it

  • landing on heads or tails.

  • For sports betting in the UK, that's displayed as evens. Much of the rest of the world uses

  • a decimal based system, which equates to 2.0, while the U.S. uses its moneyline method,

  • which would display the odds as 100.

  • For an event like horse racing with several runners there are multiple possible outcomes in a race.

  • If a horse is priced at 4/1 to win a race, then the bookmakers believe there's approximately

  • a 20% chance of it happening. So, for every $1 you bet, you'll get 4 back plus your

  • original stake if the horse crosses the line first.

  • So how do the bookies come up with these odds, and is there a way for punters like me to

  • win big? I'm going behind the scenes of British bookmaker Fitzdares to find out how it all works.

  • Very good to see you. Come on in, welcome to Fitzdares. Racing's just started.

  • These are the brokers and the traders.

  • Fitzdares is a private bookmaker that offers an exclusive membership for high rolling gamblers.

  • We've been taking bets since 1882 which is probably the oldest in the world.

  • Some customers have a quarter of a million pound credit line and that's not a bad thing,

  • we're not encouraging them to gamble, it's just the way they do business and they pay monthly.

  • They get their own phone number. So when they phone us on any phone in the

  • world, we know it's them.

  • Hi Peter, how are you? Yeah i'm very well thanks.

  • The biggest bet you've ever taken? 350 thousand, yeah. Let me have a look, the

  • next race at Sedgefield? Lots of money for Dawn O'Vaunt today. Yeah sure, 100 reverse,

  • one and four. I'll put that on for you.

  • For the traders taking bets and the success of the business as a whole, each sporting

  • event has to be given the right odds and it's the job of one man.

  • Gentleman holding the racing post. This is Glyn, head of pricing.

  • Hi Glyn, how's it going?

  • For big sporting events Glyn uses what he calls a matrix.

  • Ok here we are. The first thing I would do is to look at the weather forecast, you have

  • to know what the forecast ground is going to be. Having got the weather, I settle down

  • with my blank sheet of paper and I do this matrix and I've got eight runners down here.

  • We start with form so horse A as we can see gets three ticks. He probably won last time

  • out, he might have been a close second. E has got no form, no recent form at all. Ground,

  • if a horse doesn't act on the ground it hinders its chance immensely of winning that race.

  • So we've got A, B, like the ground. E doesn't like the ground, absolutely hates it.

  • Distance, the horse's optimum distance means a tick. Rank the trainer form as well,

  • if all his horses are running out of their skin then you've got to take that into consideration.

  • Top jockey booked up, then obviously that's going to get a tick as well. Position of the

  • race and whether they're going to be at the back or the front of the field in each

  • race. The ones with the most ticks obviously going to be strong fancys. So that's probably

  • favorite 2 to 1. All the other horses, they're all relative to the price of the favorite

  • winning the race. 4 to 1, 8 to 1 as well, 16, 14. That is our matrix complete.

  • Today, with the rise of online gambling, it's hard to find a sport without a betting market

  • open somewhere. So does it really matter more when there's money on it?

  • It only matters when there's money on it. Completely irrelevant whether I've won or

  • lost it's just a day out. Not for me, I just love it anyway.

  • Are you ever interested in a horse race if you've not got a bet on?

  • No, never. If you're going to watch it just have a

  • little bet. You could have 50 pence and it makes a difference.

  • It's about enjoyment, it's not about just bet this horse and if you lose that's it.

  • Some people eat meat, some people are vegan. Some people drink, some people don't but

  • for those that do enjoy to have a speculation and find that that's a little bit of picante,

  • then that's great and we're here for them if they are.

  • For some sports, however, betting really does matter. Horse racing here in the U.K. is only

  • possible because of the money generated from lost bets.

  • Racing and betting have a shared history in terms of the returns we receive from the betting

  • industry to be reinvested into our participants. That's to owners and trainers and jockeys

  • and stable staff. As well as ensuring that the sport is regulated to the highest standards as well.

  • The Horserace betting levy board is in charge of dividing up the money and reinvesting it

  • back into the sport. The levy is 10% of bookmakers gross profits of their horserace betting business,

  • in 2018 that was more than $126 million dollars. The largest portion is for prize money, followed

  • by investment into regulation services, racecourse fixture incentives, industry training and

  • veterinary science and finally any other administrative costs.

  • The money is designed to benefit those who work directly in the sport as well as communities

  • in which racing operates.

  • The growth in the UK betting industry in the last twenty years has coincided with the rise

  • in online gambling. The global online gambling market is expected to more than double by

  • 2024, and be worth nearly 100 billion dollars.

  • Many bookmakers have already developed their own sports betting apps to cash in on this

  • trend. That's moved the majority of money staked from the high street to almost anywhere

  • with a phone signal.

  • It's completely changed and people now can can get on their phones they can bet straightaway,

  • they can also betin running”. You can see the movement in the market as well as

  • it as it literally happens.

  • The ease at which betting is now possible has had negative effects, however. In 2017

  • a record number of gambling addicts were hospitalised in the UK, a 50% increase from the year before.

  • How much of your responsibility is to make sure that people aren't betting too much?

  • Oh yeah quite a lot, for sure. If we have a relationship with them and are

  • talking on the phone then we can make decisions together with them.

  • It's a difficult one because you want to say are you sure you're ok, but then they're

  • losing. It's the last thing they want to hear. Sometimes we just have to draw the line

  • and say I'm afraid we can't take any more bets.

  • There's lots of actually quite good protocol in this. From having timeouts to actually

  • people restricting themselves so we can't ever contact them again or for a period of time.

  • They say good things come to those who wait.

  • Some believe that the problem has been made worse by the U.K. deregulation of gambling

  • advertising since 2007. Who are paying seven places each way.

  • In a 2013 report by Ofcom, the U.K. communications regulator said there'd been about a 1400%

  • increase in gambling ads since 2005, around 1.4m a year on our TVs.

  • But for the U.K. government the growth in the gambling industry has generated significant

  • funds through taxes. Last year, the tax revenues from online sports betting alone was worth

  • £339 million or $452 million dollars to the U.K. treasury.

  • While there are strict rules on gambling in certain countries such as Japan, India & much

  • of the Middle East, there are countries that are keen to open themselves up to this lucrative industry.

  • The United States, for instance, is expected to become the world's biggest sports betting

  • market by 2023 as the number of states with legal sports betting is set to grow from 8 to 25.

  • Not only is sports betting set to become increasingly global, but through the development of digital

  • platforms, the opportunity to place a bet has never been easier.

  • But, as this sector grows, how much responsibility should governments take to balance an industry

  • that can enhance the experience of a sports fan, but also limit its damaging effects on society?

Ten on number 12, please. Ten on number 12.

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體育博彩背後的大生意|CNBC體育 (The big business behind sports betting | CNBC Sports)

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    Summer 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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