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  • - Here we go, guys, with the 10 worst English accents by Hollywood actors. You won't believe

  • how bad these are. I can't wait to show you. Let's do this.

  • Starting our countdown at number

  • 10, Anne Hathaway. She plays Emma in "One Day". Now, Emma is a character from the North

  • of England, Leeds to be specific, so you would expect her accent to have features of a Yorkshire

  • accent.

  • - An orgy won't look after you when you're old.

  • - Now, in that sentence, she does show features of a Yorkshire accent with the word after

  • or after as she said.

  • - An orgy won't look after you when you're old.

  • - Now, this is the classic split, it's called the Trap-Bath Split, it's ah and awh. Now,

  • in southern accents in England, you have the ah and awh difference, so it would be after

  • in this case. But in the north of England and Yorkshire, you've got just ah, so it would

  • be after. They wouldn't use the awh sound. So, you've got after, laughter. In fact, there's

  • another example of that.

  • - The only time Ian ever really made me laugh was when he fell down the stairs.

  • - Okay, there you go. Did you hear it? Laugh. So, in the south of England in RP and Cockney,

  • those kind of things, it would be laugh with an awh sound, in the north in Yorkshire it

  • would be ah. However, I will say this, there is not much consistency in her accent.

  • - You have to, Dex, it's the rules and absolutely no skinny-dipping.

  • - Now, in defense of Anne Hathaway, it's possible to come from Yorkshire and to speak with a

  • Received Pronunciation, but to have inflections of a Yorkshire accent throughout your speech.

  • So, that would be, in this case, it would be the laugh or the after. Those are those

  • little local pronunciation features that she might have picked up, but, generally, she

  • might speak Received Pronunciation. That's in her defense. Now, I haven't seen the full

  • film. I know that there's a lot of criticism of her accent that maybe it's not consistent,

  • and that is a problem with many of these accents is that there's just not much consistency.

  • Anyway, I think she did an okay job. Things get much worse at number nine. Really quickly,

  • I'm very excited to tell you that there is a free e-book, that I have written that you

  • can download right now for free. "50 British Slang Phrases". It's in the comments below.

  • All right, there's a link. Click on that link, and you can download that e-book straight

  • away. Okay, number nine. Giant of the big screen, Russell Crowe. This is bad.

  • - If you try to build for the future, you must set your foundations strong.

  • - Now, let's just double check. Robin Hood is from Nottingham. Okay, that's in like the

  • East Midlands. Hmm. What's this accent?

  • - If your majesty were to offer justice.

  • - Offer justice. He's become fully Irish. Okay, so you've got an Irish Robin Hood straight

  • away.

  • - If you try to build for the future.

  • - The future. Okay, Russell goes full Irish again there. Okay, we've got two examples

  • there of Russell Crowe speaking with a kind of Irish inflection . Not very good, but it's

  • there. He does try to speak with a northern accent. Let's have a look.

  • - And that King would be great. Not only would he receive the loyalty of his people.

  • - Okay, so "not only". That's not bad. So, he's linking that T across. So, when you've

  • got a consonant and then a vowel coming after it, he kind of links it over. So, "not only".

  • And then that short E sound on the "only", so not only, leh, that's quite a short clipped

  • E sound. So, that is a feature of a kind of general northern, possibly Yorkshire-ish accent.

  • - Not only would he receive the loyalty of his people, but their love as well.

  • - But their love as well. Okay, so that love. That is a feature of a northern accent. We're

  • talking generically here the north of England. Again, there's a regional split between the

  • north and the south of England in terms of accents and sounds, specifically, the ah and

  • uh sounds. So for example, if you've got putt and put, in the south of England, you've got

  • different sounds there. Pah and puh. But in the north of England, there's no distinction.

  • It's the uh sound both times. So, in the south of England, you would have love, lah, ah,

  • but in the north of England, luh, luv. So, he does manage to bring that feature of a

  • northern accent into his speech. Generally speaking, it's a pretty confused accent. He

  • swings from Irish to Northern, maybe a little bit of Australian. It's not very good, it's

  • not consistent. And that's the problem I think, with many of these accents, lack of consistency.

  • Okay, American actor, Josh Hartnett, features at number eight. He's in a film called "Blow

  • Up". It's set in the northeast of England, so we're expecting to have a kind of Tyneside

  • Geordie Northeast accent. He does not.

  • - No volume, no real hold. That's the problem.

  • - No.

  • - What's it to do with you who I talk to aye?

  • - Not a sausage.

  • - I mean I'm cutting in me Dad's shop, but not competitions.

  • - Okay, let's start of there with "me dad's shop". Now, that "me" would be "my" in most

  • accents. In the north and the northeast, yeah, "me", "me dad", "me dad". Right, okay, that's

  • not bad, but I think that's pretty much the only example I can find.

  • - It is Christina, isn't it?

  • - It is Christina, isn't it? I mean that's just said completely flat. No sense of regional

  • accent at all. So, just the name Christina in the northeast, that would have more of

  • intonation to it. It'd be Christina. You're kinda going up maybe at the end. The way he

  • does it, there's nothing. It's just flat. Nothing.

  • - I'm not so bad. Not so bad at all. What about you?

  • - What about you? I mean that is just horrific, frankly. Okay, let's just take the word "about".

  • That diphthong there, aw in Received Pronunciation. In a Geordie accent in the northeast, it'd

  • be the ooh sound, aboot, aboot. So, it's a small thing, I know, but that's the kind of

  • thing, if you're gonna try and do an accent, that's what you need to think about, is how

  • are these vowels pronounced? And I think that's a huge thing. When I hear American actors

  • trying to do British accents, is they come unstuck with the vowels, either they don't

  • do them wide enough or they just get the wrong sound. This definitely causes some American

  • actors problems. And definitely Josh Hartnett suffers here. Okay, I know this technically

  • isn't Hollywood, but it is an American actor trying to do a British accent so I thought

  • I'd include it. Ross from "Friends". This is brilliant, this scene is amazing, it's

  • hilarious. His accent is so, so bad. Now, I have done a video all about British accents

  • in "Friends". You can watch it right there. Let's just quickly look at Ross here.

  • - Right, so when Rigby got his samples back from the laboratory, he made a startling discovery.

  • - Now, the big takeaway that I've got here is that American actors, some American actors,

  • tend to try to pronounce every single sound in a word, every single syllable. When, in

  • fact, what we do in British English certainly is using shwas to blend sounds together. So

  • for example, laboratory. Now, he says, "laboratory". Laboratory, like there's so many different

  • sounds there. But how do we really say it? Laboratory. Laboratory. So, that A is getting

  • a shwa, we're crunching those sounds together. Laboratory. He does it again later.

  • - What he believed to be igneous was, in fact, sedimentary.

  • - Sedimentary. Sedimentary. How many syllables are you saying? Sedimentary. Sedimentary is

  • how we would say it in British English. So, there's definitely one thing I've noticed,

  • the pronunciation of every single syllable in a word. Now, my other reason is to why

  • this is such a terrible accent is because in one section he's speaking with Received

  • Pronunciation, in the next section, he's speaking with a Cockney accent, or trying to speak

  • with a Cockney accent.

  • - Oh bloody 'ell.

  • - Oh bloody 'ell. So, he's dropping that H for "hell". That's a feature of a Cockney

  • accent. It's terrible, he does a terrible job. Now, I know this whole thing is 'cause

  • he's panicking in the moment. So, it's not him genuinely trying to do a good British

  • accent. But I thought it'd be nice to look at. Oh Lord, if you thought the other four

  • were bad, get ready for this one.

  • - One day, you are on a School challenge. Next, it's Love Island and, before you know

  • it, you've married a footballer and bought the Bahamas.

  • - Okay, let's get some context. So, Mischa Barton, I believe, was born in Britain, but

  • moved to America when she was six. Now, she plays JJ French in "St Trinian's". This is

  • an all-girl school in Britain, but her accent does not reflect that.

  • - [JJ] But easy now girls.

  • - Straight up, that "girls" there, that strong R sound. American English has a rhotic, it

  • has that R, whereas in British English, we wouldn't really pronounce the r's. So, "girls",

  • "girls". But in American English, "girls". She gives it the full R.

  • - [JJ] But easy now girls. Blink and it's back to obscurity.

  • - Blink and it's back to obscurity. So, she's going for Received Pronunciation over the

  • "obscurity", pronunciation of the T very clear. Okay, so we've had American, now we've had

  • Received Pronunciation. What next?

  • - They want to know all about your broken hearts and your fashion disasters.

  • - Fashion disasters. Sorry, is she from California? Because that's what I'm sensing here, fashion

  • disasters. That ah sound. If we're doing Received Pronunciation, then it's the awh sound, awh.

  • But in American English in her accent, ah, so "disasters". In the same sentence, she's

  • using American English and British English. It's not very good, but it's definitely not

  • the worst.

  • - I know where the bastard sleeps. I brought him there.

  • - Ho-ho, yes. Keanu Reeves. I have such a special place in my heart for Keanu Reeves.

  • And this feels terrible that I would criticize him and his acting. Let's have a look.

  • - If I may enquire, what in fact happened to Mr Renfield in Transylvania.

  • - First of all, it sounds like Keanu Reeves, like it just sounds like Keanu. The "what",

  • "what". That kind of aspirated W, that is a feature of very, very, very, very old-fashioned,

  • high-end Received Pronunciation. It's also a feature that you might find in Scotland

  • as well, "what", "why". Why would you do that? That's a bad accent. Don't listen to that

  • one. But, yeah, that's a feature. It gets worse, it gets worse. Let's get on with it.

  • - I've seen many strange things already. Bloody wolves chasing me through some blue inferno.

  • - Seen many things, strange things already. Like it's very clipped, "already", like no

  • one speaks like that.

  • - Bloody wolves chasing me through some blue inferno.

  • - Inferno, I mean that could have been from "Bill & Ted", right, like that "inferno" there

  • is like a California surf, dude.

  • - Me through some blue inferno. I brought him there to Carfax Abbey.

  • - Carfax Abbey. Well, there with the E sound at the end of abbey, it is clipped, it's "abbey",

  • which is a feature of conservative RP, that sort of "abbey", like really, really. It's

  • not really, it's really. A very clipped E sound. So, he does have that. It's not all

  • criticism coming from me, but it just sounds rigid. It doesn't sound natural. It's pretty

  • awful, but it's Keanu, so he gets a pass. Now, this one I was tempted to put at number

  • one, simply because Charlie Hunnam is British. He's from Newcastle. So, you would expect

  • him to, at least, get somewhere close to the accent that he's trying.

  • - I'm not being funny, but the last thing I want to do is take you to the match with

  • me.

  • - Okay, so Charlie Hunnam from Newcastle. He's playing a Cockney geezer, right. He's

  • the head, the top boy of the West Ham, West Ham football team from East London. So, we're

  • expecting a Cockney accent, a strong Cockney accent. When I watched this for the first

  • time, I think I almost cried, both with laughter and sadness. It's just how bad this was.

  • - I'm not being funny, but the last thing I want to do is take you to the match with

  • me.

  • - Okay, the biggest problem here that Charlie Hunnam has is the vowel sounds. He doesn't

  • get the vowels wide enough. In a Cockney accent, you've got really broad wide vowels, like

  • "take", "take", right. Here, he says it with a Received Pronunciation, "take". It's a pretty

  • standard vowel sound. But as I say, in Cockney, you've got a broad wide sound, it's "take",

  • I don't want to "take" you, right. It's big. So, what he's doing here is putting in a sentence,

  • he's using Cockney, bits of Cockney, with Received Pronunciation. He does it throughout.

  • - You reckon! Mate, I think you should get on the next train and off out of here.

  • - "Train", there again, the vowel sound's not wide enough. It should be "train", "train".

  • All right, get on the next train, yeah. But he says it in a sort of standard way. So,

  • that's the problem he has. He's just not broadening out those vowel sounds. The Ts aren't formed

  • properly, and it made it even worse by the fact that he's from Britain, so I feel like

  • he should do better.

  • - What was you studying before this geezer stitched you up? I teach history.

  • - Wait, what was that? I teach history. He's from Ireland now. What the very, what? Yeah,

  • inconsistent. Once again, we've got Cockney, Received Pronunciation, Irish. So bad, and

  • it's only gonna get worse. Okay, you might see my demeanor change daily. I have been

  • a bit frustrated and angry with some of those previous ones, but this is just glorious.

  • Kevin Costner, "Prince of Thieves". It's so bad, it's genius. Again, Mr. Costner, he's

  • supposed to be playing Robin Hood from Nottingham. The Nottingham in Minnesota?

  • - Will, do you think that the sheriff will give everything back after I'm gone?

  • - Could he sound more American? "Back after I'm gone". So, in Received Pronunciation or

  • a standard British accent, you might say "gone". Go-uh, that uh sound. He's saying "gone" with

  • an ah sound. "Gone", which is a feature of American English. "After", he says "after".

  • That uh sound in Received Pronunciation, ah in American English. Also in fairness, in

  • the northern accent as well. But he doesn't say "after", "after I'm gone", "after I'm

  • gone". That's maybe what it might sound like in a northern accent. He says, "after I'm

  • gone."

  • - Even this boy can be taught to find the chinks in every suit of armor.

  • - This is great because suit of armor. He's trying to do a British accent there. He said

  • the word "taught", "taught", "taught". In Received Pronunciation, "taught", "taught".

  • - Then by God we take it back.

  • - "By God we take it back". Kevin, I love you. This is amazing, thank you. But wait,

  • if he's at number three, who's at number two?

  • - All right, chaps, hang on to your knickers.

  • - Yeah. Don Cheadle. Don Cheadle in "Ocean's Eleven". This is another real favorite of

  • mine. I love this actor, because it's, for me, it's like the perfect example of American

  • actors trying to do a Cockney accent. So basically, as you probably notice, most people, most

  • actors here, they try to do Received Pronunciation, kinda get that wrong, or they try a Cockney

  • accent. Just like with "Green Street" before, Don Cheadle tries to throw in loads of Cockney

  • Rhyming Slang to cover up the fact that the accent is appalling. And it's just awful.

  • - They're so pony that they've gone and blown up the backup grid one by one like dominoes.

  • - All right, so there's our first example of Cockney Rhyming Slang, "pony". "Pony and

  • trap" rhymes with crap. So, not very good, right. His "pony", it's not very good. It

  • sounds really weird in his hands. Also like "blown", it's too much on the vowel there.

  • "Blown".

  • - Better yet a pinch is a bomb, you know. But without the bomb.

  • - "But without the bomb". Here he's gone to Australia maybe? "Without the bomb". Yeah.

  • - That poxy demo crew who haven't used the to back the main line, have they? They've

  • only nosed up the main frame nosed it right up. So, unless we intend to do this job in

  • Reno, we're in barny. Barny rubble, trouble!

  • - No, Don, leave it. Leave it, son. All right? Leave the Cockney Rhyming Slang to one side.

  • All right? You don't need it.

  • - Hang on, are you accusing me of booby-trappin'?

  • - "Are you accusing me of booby-trappin'?" Here's that inconsistency again, very American.

  • "Accusing me". Okay, that's not an American accent, but, you know what I mean. "Of booby-trappin'".

  • Like a kinda faux, like a Mockney accent, like a pretend Cockney accent. It's just confusing,

  • this inconsistency here. That's enough of Don Cheadle. I love him. I love that this

  • exists 'cause it just brings me joy and laughter. Let's get to number one. - All right, ladies

  • and gents.

  • - It had to be, it had to be Dick Van Dyke. This is a legendary performance. In Britain,

  • we love this so much because it's so funny. It's so, so bad, that it's hilarious. I think,

  • I have a theory that the reason why all the other accents were so bad is because of this

  • one. This was the original terrible English accent by an American actor. It's joyous,

  • just enjoy it. ♪ A spoon full of sugar goes a long, long way ♪ ♪ Have yourself a healthy

  • helping every day

  • - You've got his American accent coming in. You've got this terrible Cockney accent coming

  • in. ♪ Day ♪ I mean