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  • Hello, My subscribers and hello others.

  • You're about to see a few clips from the 19 fifties about the phone, the phone.

  • It was our cell phone back then, when I was growing up, it was something new.

  • The previous generation didn't have a phone on the wall where you could actually talk to your friends without seeing them.

  • We were addicted to the phones, particularly girls.

  • Teenage girls.

  • They would talk for hours on the phone on the phone was in the kitchen on a wall, so it wasn't private.

  • And the phone companies aren't stupid.

  • They watching this saying, Wow, these people are talking for hours, even though it was a five cent coal or a 10 cent Cole.

  • Maybe a couple of dollars a month, and virtually everybody in the middle class had a phone, so you saw it on the wall.

  • Then they began to make the cord longer.

  • Why not?

  • He could hide a little more, and eventually they come up with a second phone, which could be in the bedrooms.

  • He could close the door, and then they came up with this design, the princess phone.

  • By the time I was in high school, and the Princess phone was small.

  • It had a light when you picked it up, the light went on, and we all use the phone enormously.

  • And it fascinated the older generation who thought it was both good and bad.

  • So you're forced going to see a clip of a boy in the late 19 fifties talking on the phone as part of a psychological experiment with professional psychologists are evaluating.

  • What is this kid really doing?

  • You're going to hear the language of the time, which I think is fascinating.

  • I wish I had 100 of these interviews on the second clip I'm going to show is a portion of a film I made for Life magazine for their 50th anniversary Life magazine.

  • In every single home at that time, every middle class home every week, with a photograph on the cover and lots of pictures with lots of articles, everybody read it, and many show teenagers in various activities having a soda, doing the hair, putting on a ring and on the phone.

  • Those photographs were photographed by Nina Leen.

  • She was a great photographer, fascinated by teenage behavior.

  • So in this little section, you're going to see her analysis of why she took these pictures and what she saw when she saw these kids on the phone.

  • Now you have the cell phone, Different era.

  • I don't know that the traditional phone means anything.

  • Like what it meant back then with Instagram and all the other communications tools.

  • But for us, then 19 fifties, the phone was a miraculous way to separate from the family and the parents and just talk.

  • Hello, Sally.

  • Hi.

  • What?

  • You know, I'm fine.

  • And you?

  • That's good.

  • No, I just called to see how things are.

  • Yeah, things were kind of dead around here too.

  • I just thought I call up and we could talk for a little while.

  • Well, if you've got some big deal project on or something.

  • Okay.

  • We'll talk for about five minutes, then what you got to say for yourself?

  • I don't know.

  • Yeah.

  • Been drinking many soldiers lately.

  • Why?

  • Why?

  • You flipped?

  • I never said anything like that.

  • I did not.

  • I didn't mention ciggies.

  • Name all I said.

  • What?

  • Have you been met drinking many sodas lately?

  • What I like Have you been seeing sea?

  • I mean, it's up to you if you want to take chances.

  • I can't guarantee my presence in the future.

  • It was you that didn't want to go steady.

  • That's right.

  • Well, I told you you didn't have to tell your parents.

  • Yeah.

  • All right.

  • We'll talk about it later tonight.

  • Tom is pretty sophisticated and sure of himself.

  • He knows what he wants to do, and he knows what he's about.

  • He feels pretty much at ease when he works with his girl to persuade her that she should go steady, which is very important to him right now.

  • Later on, he'll be concerned about the girl he's going to marry, and he'll be thinking in terms of the kind of a person he could enjoy and be with the rest of his life.

  • Lucy, starting at the teenage, has another kind of problem.

  • And we lookin at her here, talking with her mother about her difficulties with the same telephone.

  • The thing to do if you're worried about this phone business, is to try to think of a way of getting the better of it.

  • What sort of way?

  • Well, why don't you pretend that you ever calls you was Tom.

  • I have a feeling that you're talking to your brother.

  • I don't think that would work.

  • I just run out of words again.

  • Oh, well, it may not work, but there's no harm in trying, is there?

  • Well, maybe we'll think of something better.

  • Nobody's gonna call me up anyway.

  • Shall I answer it if you want to.

  • It's not for me anyway.

  • I see.

  • Yeah, she's here.

  • Just a month.

  • Lucy.

  • Phone, huh?

  • Oh, hi, Edward.

  • Oh, I'm fine.

  • How are you?

  • How?

  • Student council.

  • Oh, you're not on student council.

  • Well, did you watch television last night?

  • Oh, what'd you see?

  • Was it funny?

  • Oh, well, what did you call about Edward?

  • I mean, I'm sort of in the middle of something.

  • Oh, Jane Patterson.

  • Sure.

  • Uh, it's Crest View 5111 It's right.

  • You're welcome.

  • Goodbye.

  • They took my word that I will not take pictures, which they object.

  • They trust with me.

  • The teenagers trusted me.

  • This is why I got along with them.

  • Then they showed me the newer thing.

  • They weren't afraid that I will criticize them and say it shouldn't be like that.

  • Or don't do that or whatever.

  • You know, This'll is a young teenage suburbia, kids sucking away us at sodas and the little girl in the background looking out of the corner of her eye at the boy that she's charming.

  • I don't think Nina Leen was was touched by anybody else in this particular get inside the minutia of how people looked and behaved in all levels of American society, there were.

  • Sometimes people were not aware off things like in this.

  • Um, it said.

  • I think it was a teenage girl story or teenage bono teenage girls that in spite and got the captain ist I ordered different two minute in it.

  • Now I think Teenage girl story.

  • They were twins, boy and girl, and he knew I was waiting for them, you know, to take pictures.

  • And he said She's on the phone.

  • I went there and there she was sitting and there were not one minute where she kept her position to say in one foot, went back one down, one.

  • She changed the position.

  • I mean, it was unbelievable.

Hello, My subscribers and hello others.

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A2 初級

觀看20世紀50年代的手機上的青少年。 (Watch Teens On The PHONE In The 1950s)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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