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  • Hello lovely people!

  • If you're new here, welcome, I'm Jessica. On this channel I talk about vintage fashion

  • (obviously), gayness (not so obviously) and invisible disabilities (really not obviously).

  • Make sure to subscribe, if you haven't already, for some great amusing and educational content

  • on Tuesdays and Fridays! And hit the little bell to get notifications. Because otherwise,

  • how will you know when I post!?

  • Wellunless you follow me on Twitter and Instagram

  • [ding]

  • In today's video we're going to be discussing: dyslexia!

  • I'm really interested to know how many of you watching identify as having dyslexia (or

  • dyspraxia- although despite being related that's very much a video in itself!) and

  • whether you've made it over the hurdle of being officially diagnosed. There will be

  • a little question card in the corner above.

  • Have a look at them and let me know

  • This was actually a request I was sent by a subscriber, Dylan, and my channel members,

  • The Kellgren-Fozard Club, helped me decide on the content. If you would also like to

  • become a member and have a say on future videos then click the 'join' button below or

  • the link in the description.

  • I'll go into what dyslexia actually is and the signs of Dyslexia in a minute but for

  • now just know that it is one of a family of Specific Learning Difficulties.

  • Don't panic! 'Learning difficulty' and 'learning disability' are not the same

  • If you're a parent watching this and you've had no prior contact with anyone has brain

  • troubles of any kind and your child has just been diagnosed with dyslexiawell this

  • can be a lot to process. I know

  • Ha! 'Process'. Nice use of words, Jessica.

  • It's a 'difficulty', not a 'disability' although it can be classified as one under

  • the UK's Equality Act of 2010 and thus extreme cases will make a person eligible for various

  • types of assistance.

  • Also: people with learning disabilities are cool.

  • Trust me: I have brain damage and I'm fabulous.

  • It's estimated that up to 1 in every 10 people has some degree of dyslexia but it

  • varies wildly in severity.

  • A Specific Learning Difficulty affects the way information is learned and processed.

  • It's a neurological, rather than psychological, problem- that means it's caused by your

  • nerves not functioning the way they should, rather than something you can physically see,

  • like your brain being in the shape of a peacock.

  • [beat]

  • Weird example. Guess my favourite animal (!)

  • Although dyslexia usually runs in families- my mother, brother and various cousins are

  • dyslexic- doctors have yet to find the root cause or even the one specific gene that controls

  • it. Whilst dyslexia has a significant impact on your ability to learn and acquire literacy

  • skills, it occurs completely independently of intelligence.

  • So you can be a genius and also be dyslexic!

  • Leonardo da Vinci, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, George Washington, Whoopi Goldberg and Richard

  • Branson!

  • - Granted, he might not be winning any prestigious prizes for his intelligence but he IS worth

  • over £3 billion so he's doing something right.

  • You can also be dyslexic andnot… a genius.

  • That's why an IQ test is given alongside a standard test for dyslexia: to

  • make sure the issues the person is facing are specific to dyslexia and not part of a

  • wider problem.

  • As with any disability, no two people experience the same combination of difficulties. When

  • most people find out I'm dyslexic they assume it means I can't read very well. Interestingly,

  • whilst my mother and, to a lesser extent, my brother really struggle with reading, I

  • was that little Matilda who spent the summer holidays dragging a cart full of books to

  • the library and back every day.

  • At my peak I was reading six books a day and by the age of eight I'd gobbled up everything

  • in the children and young adult section so stumbled into the weird adult fantasy romance

  • section because they had pretty colours and- boy- were those not okay for a child to be

  • reading!

  • I was also very loquacious as a child but when it came time to put those words onto

  • paper… I justcouldn't…

  • I could chat to my teachers all day about a topic but the second they asked me to pick

  • up a pen and begin writing

  • It was as if the words would form in my brain, travel down my arm and then get stuck in my

  • hand. I just couldn't get them through my fingers and into the pen.

  • I tried bright colours, sparkly gel pens, different types of paperbut nope! Even

  • when I was writing a nice note to my Nana or a birthday card to a friend, I just couldn't

  • make the words come out of my hands and I'd more often than not sit crying over a sheet

  • of paper, unable to do anything.

  • - You should see me attempting to write an Instagram caption-

  • I can read when a word is wrong but I can't tell you how to make it right.

  • I would sit in exams, wasting hours and hours, trying to work out how to spell the word 'of':

  • - that last one was because I'm aware 'z' seemed like an underused letter of the alphabet

  • and yet we still had to learn it so surely it was used for something, right?

  • Right?

  • Right?!

  • [deep breathe]

  • Why are you making me learn unnecessary letters, like this isn't already hard enough?!

  • Writing is a little easier if I'm creating things as I go- whether that be fiction writing

  • or a script for something I'm very passionate about.

  • BUT when it comes to concrete facts and stitching them together

  • Gah! [bomb sfx]

  • No...

  • Even writing a text to a friend is something I really struggle with. Once we get into the

  • flow of conversation I'm good to go and can instant message backwards and forwards

  • as long as no one says a date, time or 'to do'. Then I'm stuck.

  • Please feel free to weigh in on why on earth you think that happens to me. I think it might

  • be because I'm so worried about 'getting it wrong' like mixing up my times, days

  • and places that I just stop, drop and roll out of that conversation…!

  • But what causes dyslexia?

  • So far, nine different genes that control the development of the brain have been identified

  • and several more have suggested. These genes all control the development of the brain and

  • can cause differences in its structure which can create abnormal collections of nerve cells

  • in the wrong places during development. These miscroscopic differences in connectivity between

  • neurones particularly affect 'magnocellular' systems which are specialised for rapid information

  • processing.

  • Meaning if you ask me to spell something immediately, quickly, now, on the spot!- I will freeze

  • up and 'letter, who they? I hardly know them.'

  • This is because dyslexic brains are wired in such a way that they find it difficult

  • to recognise the different sounds that make up words and how they relate to letters.

  • Even before losing my hearing I had a very hard time telling rhyming words apart and

  • I still am pretty much unable to break a word down into its phonetics (the component sounds)

  • even if I can say the word.

  • Yesterday, whilst testing myself for this video, I learnt that 'Jessica' and 'Claudia'

  • have the same number of syllables. I learnt that yesterday. I've been married to her

  • for almost three years and I only learnt that yesterday!

  • Jess-i-ca Claud-i-a

  • I've always thought 'Claudia' was a four syllable word.

  • Don't ask me how.

  • Clearly I can't tell you how.

  • Words are confusing.

  • That's this video in its entirety!

  • I was first diagnosed with dyslexia and dyspraxia when I was 8 years old. I think it was a pretty

  • obvious go-to diagnosis for me since dyslexia already ran in my family and I was clearly

  • a child who could express herself verbally very well.

  • - and still does! People sometimes class me as a 'blogger' and I'm like…[laughs] no friend,

  • I can't even spell 'milk'

  • I've just realised it's a four letter word. Damn right it is!

  • So no, I'm pretty secure in my vlogger-ness.

  • I also have correctly spelt merch!

  • I lived in Bristol at the time and there was a special Dyslexia School in the city that

  • children attended full-time or part-time depending on the severity of their dyslexia. It's

  • also where a lot of children took the official dyslexia test.

  • I actually remember my tester getting very mad at me though because he thought I was

  • faking my test results and purposefully getting things wrong as he didn't believe I could

  • be so eloquent and yet so utterly unable to spell!

  • The results of that first test when I was 8 years old was that I had an adult reading

  • age (it only goes up to 18+) and the spelling age of… a 4 year old. Preschoolers

  • could spell better than I could.

  • I was tested again before I went to university at 18 and the tester that time was again like

  • What is happening in your brain?!”

  • Because I have a visual IQ in the 99th percentile (which is the top) and phonological awareness

  • in theunder 1… th percentile.

  • Is that how you say that?

  • No! Under first!

  • Gah!

  • Bah, what do I know?!

  • That's actually not uncommon for dyslexics though- we tend to have very strong visual,

  • creative and problem solving skills whilst being terrible at reading, writing, telling

  • our left from right, remembering sequences like the alphabet or months of the year, copying

  • down written instructions or even following spoken ones.

  • It's also very common to mirror things. For me the letters-

  • -are pretty indistinguishable. I'm actually reading that out. Becausethey're all

  • lies!

  • What even is the alphabet anyway?!

  • I find that signing letters actually helps me to remember the sequence of the alphabet

  • but I have to ask my sign language interpreters not to fingerspell to me because I… just

  • can't work out what on earth they're saying!

  • Other common difficulties of dyslexia: a tendency to confuse verbal instructions, places, times

  • and dates. Difficulty with planning and writing essays or even getting started and completing

  • I was counting and it's just gone off

  • Greater difficulty in learning a foreign language, disorganisation and frustration

  • which can lead to behavioural or emotional difficulties.

  • Having said that, again, dyslexia varies from person to person and no two people will have

  • the same set of strengths and weaknesses. It also often co-occurs with related conditions,

  • such as dyspraxia, dyscalculia and attention deficit disorder.

  • So it can be difficult to tell where the problem comes from precisely. I don't know. Maybe

  • I have dyslexia because I was already brain damaged but I got diagnosed after my dyslexia.

  • Maybe I wasn't. Maybe I just happened to have two things. Who knows.

  • Although Dyslexia is a life-long condition which can have a substantial effect on a person's

  • day to day activities, and certainly school work or careersthere are some things that

  • dyslexic people are generally pretty awesome at so let's take a few moments to talk about

  • those and if you're a dyslexic in need of a self-confidence boost I want you to pick

  • out the ones that relate to you. Don't worry about the ones that don't, we're not here

  • to beat ourselves up, just concentrate on the things you're really great at and then

  • at the end, once you've finished watching the video, leave a comment with the things

  • that you think you're really great at. Don't be British about it (especially if you're

  • not British- you definitely don't have any excuse then!), don't feel you have to be

  • overly humble. I want you to big yourself up!

  • So:

  • Imaginative Good at thinking and reasoning skills

  • Able to see thebig pictureGood at problem solving

  • Good general knowledge Good understanding of texts

  • Curious

  • Sophisticated receptive language Good visual-spatial skills

  • Good critical thinking and reasoning skills Capacity to perceive information 3-dimensionally

  • Creative practical skills Good interpersonal skills

  • Intuitive Good visual memory

  • Sport and/or drama skills

  • There are probably lots more that I've forgotten so write them in the comments below and let's

  • create a really positive space where we can boost amazing people with dyslexia rather

  • than always talking or thinking about the things we can't do.

  • If you Google 'are dyslexics…' you get: messy, disorganised, dumb and intelligent…?

  • Along with 'more successful'? Which: yes!

  • A dyslexic person can, yes, have difficulties with structuring work schedules, filling in

  • forms or map reading and likely will constantly lose and forget things BUT-

  • With a little extra time in school and access to their own personal computer- which thankfully

  • being officially diagnosed as dyslexic gave me access to- we can produce amazing, complex,

  • beautiful work!

  • Often dyslexics will have a low opinion of their capabilities because we're compared

  • to neurotypical people constantly and it can be a battle in the classroom just to get work

  • on the page, regardless of whether it's spelt correctly or not! But, when people take

  • the time to read those almost illegible, horribly misspelled hasty squiggles, they'll often

  • see amazing creativity.

  • Through weekly one-to-one sessions with a specially-trained dyslexia teacher at the

  • centre I mentioned earlier, and then latter at a special learning unit that was attached

  • to my school, I developed my love of writing.

  • I also learnt cool memory tricks for spelling like:

  • Does Oliver Eat Sweets? Does!

  • Or “I take the bus into business”- one s!

  • OrBig Elephants Can Add Up Sums Easily”- because!

  • Still haven't found one for 'of'…

  • With the right help dyslexia really is something you can find your way around and it doesn't

  • have to stop you from anything you want to do or becoming anything you want to be. But

  • it does take a little work and an investment in time.

  • Potentially also an investment in a really good speech to text package!

  • If you think you or your child might have dyslexia and would like to be assessed then

  • contact your local or national dyslexia association for advice and they'll be able to point

  • you in the right direction. You're also able to self-refer in this way if you are

  • a child and your parents or school are stopping you from getting access to the help you need

  • - side note, some schools are reluctant to refer children for dyslexia tests because

  • once they have an official diagnosis the school has to spend more money on you. But that's

  • why you pay taxes and you're entitled to that money so a big fat 'whatever'!

  • to that.

  • The earlier a child with dyslexia is diagnosed, the more effective educational interventions

  • are likely to be but even in adulthood you're able to learn coping mechanisms that will

  • make life with dyslexia easier.

  • Thank you so much for watching, especially if you're not dyslexic and are just here

  • to educate yourself- you're my favourite kind of person. Please remember to write why

  • you and other dyslexics are amazing humans in the comments, like and subscribe if you

  • haven't already and I'll see you in our next video!

Hello lovely people!

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閱讀障礙--現在拼什麼?[CC] (Dyslexia - spell what now?! [CC])

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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